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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1. Search the whole document.

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Coffeeville (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
o beyond Grenada, and attempt to hold present line of communication. On the 5th, he was at Oxford, twenty-eight miles beyond Holly Springs, with his cavalry at Coffeeville, only eighteen miles from Grenada. This whole advance was made without serious fighting, as the enemy fell back rapidly before any show of pursuit. On the 5thack. After cutting the two roads, General Sherman's movements, to secure the end desired, will necessarily be left to his judgment. I will occupy this road to Coffeeville. Written instructions conformable to the above dispatch were on the same day given to Sherman; headquarters Thirteenth army corps. Department of the Tenneses. But the country was found to be abundantly stocked. Every thing for the subsistence of man or beast, for fifteen miles east and west of the railroad, from Coffeeville to La Grange, was appropriated to the use of the army. The families of the farmers suffered, but the soldiers were fed; and the lesson was taught which Grant a
Bolivar, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
rom that place, the reopening of the road from Humboldt to Memphis, and the concentration of the troops from Corinth and Bolivar, and with small reenforcements at Memphis, I think I would be able to move down the Mississippi Central road, and cause on, on the 2d of November: I have commenced a movement on Grand Junction, with three divisions from Corinth and two from Bolivar. Will leave here to-morrow and take command in person. If found practicable, I will go to Holly Springs, and, may be, he available cavalry of the Army of the Tennessee was also sent after the raiders, and all commanders between Oxford and Bolivar were notified of the rebel movements, and directed to hold their respective posts at all hazards. Men and commanders everywhere did their duty, except at Holly Springs; and the enemy was repulsed at Coldwater, Davis Mills, Bolivar, and Middleburg; but Holly Springs was captured while the troops were in their beds. The commanding officer of the post, Colonel Murphy,
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
t lives off the country Reopens his communications Sherman's assault on Vicksburg repulse of Sherman McClernand takes command of river expedition capture of Arkansas post Grant falls back to Memphis extraordinary behavior of Mc-Clernand Grant takes command of river expedition protest of McClernand. The transcendent imp have the immediate command under your direction. The first part of this dispatch was an order to divide all the troops in Grant's command, including those from Arkansas, into four corps. And thus a political general was foisted on Halleck and his subordinate; the influences brought to bear on the President were too strong forzoo river, Sherman at once proposed to McClernand that, while waiting for further orders from Grant, the expeditionary force should be employed in the capture of Arkansas Post, a strong work on the Arkansas, fifty miles from its mouth. The object was to occupy the troops, and raise their spirits, depressed by the recent failure,
Grand Junction (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
er, the latter announced from Jackson, on the 2d of November: I have commenced a movement on Grand Junction, with three divisions from Corinth and two from Bolivar. Will leave here to-morrow and takegraph as I go. Holly Springs is on the Mississippi Central railroad, twenty-five miles from Grand Junction, and about half way to the Tallahatchie river. The distance to Grenada from Grand Junction Grand Junction is one hundred miles. General Pemberton, having superseded Van Dorn, who remained to serve under him, was at this time in command of the forces opposed to Grant, and had fortified strongly on the Tallahatchie, his advance, however, reaching as far north as La Grange and Grand Junction. When Halleck received word that Grant had absolutely started south, he telegraphed: I approve of your plan of ads therefore obliged to hold them all. On the 4th of November, he had seized La Grange and Grand Junction, and announced: My moving force will be about thirty thousand men. McPherson commanded his
Fort Pillow (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
Confederacy, could supplies of such consequence be procured. This tangible and practical advantage would be entirely lost, when the control of the Mississippi river was gone; and no consideration had greater weight with the rebel leaders than this, in the long and gallant defence they made for their main artery of supply. Accordingly, the insurgents early seized the most important positions along the river, and, with a keen appreciation of their natural advantages, fortified Columbus, Fort Pillow, Island Number10, Vicksburg, and later, Port Hudson. The first three of these places had fallen, in the spring of 1862; but Vicksburg, situated at a remarkable bend in the river, and on one of the few bluffs that mark its course, was rendered one of the strongest fortified places in America. In June, 1862, after the capture of New Orleans, a combined expedition moved up the river, under Commodore Farragut and Brigadier-General Thomas Williams, who found no difficulty in making their wa
Springfield (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
the river expedition, and that he shall have the immediate command under your direction. The first part of this dispatch was an order to divide all the troops in Grant's command, including those from Arkansas, into four corps. And thus a political general was foisted on Halleck and his subordinate; the influences brought to bear on the President were too strong for the soldiers. There was of course nothing to do but obey; and Grant wrote on the same day to McClernand, who was at Springfield, Illinois: I have been directed this moment, by telegraph from the general-in-chief of the army, to divide the forces of this department into four army corps, one of which is to be commanded by yourself, and that to form a part of the expedition on Vicksburg. I have drafted the order, and will forward it to you as soon as printed. . . . Written and verbal instructions have been given to General Sherman, which will be turned over to you on your arrival at Memphis. On the 20th, however, the
Big Black (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
he dispatched on the 8th, to Memphis. Porter was informed of the plan, and was requested to cooperate. Sherman was instructed to move with all celerity, and informed, that I will hold the troops here in readiness to cooperate with you in such manner as the movements of the enemy may make necessary. This was the extent of Grant's promise of cooperation. It was, however, understood in conversation, that in case Pemberton retreated, Grant would follow him up, between the Yazoo and the Big Black rivers, to the Mississippi. Grant was still anxious lest McClernand should obtain the command of the river expedition, and therefore had hurried Sherman to Memphis, on the very day that he received the authority, so that, if possible, the latter might start before McClernand could arrive. Halleck, too, sent the permission to Grant to dispatch Sherman, without that deliberation which he sometimes displayed; but on the 9th, he telegraphed: The President may insist upon sending a separate com
Davis Mills (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
ken every precaution to meet it. General Sullivan, who commanded at Jackson, was reinforced rapidly, and directed to move out towards the enemy. All of the available cavalry of the Army of the Tennessee was also sent after the raiders, and all commanders between Oxford and Bolivar were notified of the rebel movements, and directed to hold their respective posts at all hazards. Men and commanders everywhere did their duty, except at Holly Springs; and the enemy was repulsed at Coldwater, Davis Mills, Bolivar, and Middleburg; but Holly Springs was captured while the troops were in their beds. The commanding officer of the post, Colonel Murphy, of the Eighth Wisconsin volunteers, had taken no steps to protect the place, not notifying a single officer of the command, of the approaching danger, although he himself had received early warning from Grant. The troops were blameless, for the first intimation they had of an attack, was when they found themselves surrounded; and notwithstandi
Oxford (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
nd, I will be able to have them show themselves at different points on the Tallahatchie and Yallabusha, and where an opportunity occurs, make a real attack. After cutting the two roads, General Sherman's movements, to secure the end desired, will necessarily be left to his judgment. I will occupy this road to Coffeeville. Written instructions conformable to the above dispatch were on the same day given to Sherman; headquarters Thirteenth army corps. Department of the Tennessee, Oxford, Mississippi, December 8, 1862. Major-General W. T. Sherman, commanding Right Wing: You will proceed, with as little delay as possible, to Memphis, Tennessee, taking with you one division of your present command. On your arrival at Memphis, you will assume command of all the troops there, and that portion of General Curtis's forces at present east of the Mississippi river, and organize them into brigades and divisions in your own army. As soon as possible move with them down the river to the
La Grange (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
the Tallahatchie, his advance, however, reaching as far north as La Grange and Grand Junction. When Halleck received word that Grant had abbliged to hold them all. On the 4th of November, he had seized La Grange and Grand Junction, and announced: My moving force will be about hatchie, as soon as possible. 1 am now ready to move from here (La Grange), any day, and only await your movements. Sherman was to notify oyance. The railroad, however, was not seriously damaged between La Grange and Oxford, except at Holly Springs, and the enemy had possession fifteen miles east and west of the railroad, from Coffeeville to La Grange, was appropriated to the use of the army. The families of the faand, while uncertain as to its results, he moved his army back to La Grange, abandoning the campaign, which had been pressed to a distance ofuntil he had beaten the enemy in the field. When he started from La Grange, he indeed meant and hoped to threaten Vicksburg, but his prime o
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