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Malvern Hill (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
owers that were, in our behalf. It did seem, however, that the authorities studiously avoided exposing us to danger, and kept the battery continuously on the move, so as to shield it from the enemy's bullets. Around Richmond, from April to November, 1862, either in camp of instruction or manning some of the heavy redoubts that encircled that city, we took no active part in the bloody scenes that were enacted at Seven Pines, Mechanicsville, Gaines' Mill, Cold Harbor, Savage's Station and Malvern Hill, though within sound, and, at times, in sight of bursting of shell and rattling of musketry upon those fields of carnage. From November, 1862, to June, 1863, we helped to guard the line of the Blackwater under Pryor, and assisted in the investment of Suffolk under Longstreet. During the remainder of 1863, with the exception of a few weeks at Chaffin's Bluff, we remained around Petersburg, our principle duty being to stand guard over Fort Clifton. The first five months of 1864 found us
Barton Heights (Oregon, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
be a Liverpool, Lynchburg an Edinboroa, Richmond a Paris, and Farmville a London. The Doctor concluded by comparing Lee's memory to the brightly-shining morning star. After this Judge F. R. Farrar (Johnnie Reb.) and others spoke. At Barton Heights. The Lee-birthday ball, which took place at Barton Heights at night, was one of the most brilliant social events that has ever enlivened the pretty little suburban town. The dance took place in the Wigwam, which was handsomely decorated Barton Heights at night, was one of the most brilliant social events that has ever enlivened the pretty little suburban town. The dance took place in the Wigwam, which was handsomely decorated for the occasion, and nearly fifty couples were present. Music was furnished by string and brass bands, and a splendid supper was served. Judge Flournoy's speech. Hon. Henry W. Flournoy was the orator of the evening and made a splendid speech, which was well punctuated with applause. Judge Flournoy spoke for about fifteen minutes, dealing almost entirely with the life and character of General Lee. He laid great stress upon the fact that General Lee was the only man of the century whos
Plymouth, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
g the surrender of Johnston at Greensboro, N. C. I shall endeavor briefly to recount some of the incidents and events that came under my observation while with this little command during this short but eventful period. After the evacuation of Plymouth, Washington, Kinston and Goldsboro, Brigadier-General L. S. Baker was sent to Weldon, charged with the duty of holding on to that place, not only for the purpose of preserving railroad communication between the other forces in North Carolina andg one of the principal sources of supply for the armies in the field—instructed General Baker to hold it until the last moment, and, at the same time, watch out for and repel any raids of the enemy coming from the Blackwater and Chowan, and from Plymouth, Washington and Goldsboro. With the force under his command this was no light duty, and he was necessarily absent from Weldon most of his time, looking after the various points under his supervision. Weldon, however, was the headquarters of hi
Fairfax (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
e Confederate States Army. [The following account has been compiled from the Fairfax Herald of October 3, 1890, and other newspapers, kindly furnished by Mrs. S. C. Vedder, Secretary of the Central Committee of the Memorial Association of Fairfax county.] A little more than two years ago a little notice was inserted in the Fairfax Herald, signed Ex-Confederate, requesting the citizens of Fairfax Courthouse and vicinity to meet in the Courthouse on a day designated, for the purpose of takikeeping, and there is no lost cause in His tender providence. We would that it were possible to thank by name every man, woman, and child for their ready response, for contributing in money and provisions, but we can only say, kind people of Fairfax county, both native born and adopted citizens, and many in Alexandria, Washington, and Georgetown, that you lightened our labors by your kindly words, you made possible the creditable occasion by your money, you helped to entertain our guests by you
Old Point (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
dred and fifty human beings into the angry waves. All night the waves were dashing overboard. Sometimes the machinery would stop, while we were ordered from right to left to balance the ship. Thoroughly soaked to the skin, we finally reached Old Point and safety in the morning. No one, perhaps, breathed freer than our captain of the boat. Leaving Old Point after a short stop, we reached Rocketts that afternoon. Arrival in Richmond. Could a picture have been taken of the men who arrOld Point after a short stop, we reached Rocketts that afternoon. Arrival in Richmond. Could a picture have been taken of the men who arrived in Richmond from the prison-pens during those days, it would not be believed that the men who walked from the boat in Rocketts in June, 1865, were the proud soldier boys that left here in April, 1861. Silent, friendless, and sorrowful each one went his way. No welcome, no cheer awaited their return to this city and to their homes. Oh how few could boast of having homes! Nothing but ruins everywhere; but the man who was a good soldier generally proved himself to be a good citizen. The r
Kinston (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
nston at Greensboro, N. C. I shall endeavor briefly to recount some of the incidents and events that came under my observation while with this little command during this short but eventful period. After the evacuation of Plymouth, Washington, Kinston and Goldsboro, Brigadier-General L. S. Baker was sent to Weldon, charged with the duty of holding on to that place, not only for the purpose of preserving railroad communication between the other forces in North Carolina and the Army of Northernon railroad had been given up; and Sherman had made his memorable march through Georgia to the sea, and through the Carolinas, having as his objective point Goldsboro, where he purposed to form a junction with Schofield, moving from Newberne and Kinston, and with Terry, moving from Wilmington. This was accomplished by him on the 23d of March, 1865. The giant arms of an octopus were rapidly closing upon the Confederacy in her final desperate but grand struggle for independence. Just one month
Monroe Hill (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
risoner and invoked God's pity upon all prisoners and captives. He had a young, joyous-hearted brother in my command who is now an Episcopal clergyman in Canada, though he has recently been travelling and preaching in England in the interest of missions. This younger brother took charge of the remains of my youngest boy-brother, killed in action at Chancellorsville, and carried them to Richmond for burial in Hollywood. I have two young hero brothers buried in that beautiful cemetery on Monroe Hill. Robert Edward Lee. [compiled from the Richmond dispatch, January 20, 1891.] First observance of his Birth—day, January 19th—Ordained by the Virginia Assembly as a legal Holiday—Observed throughout Virginia, and in Georgia, Maryland and New York. The Birth-day of General Robert Edward Lee, ordained as a legal holiday by the Virginia Assembly, was on January 19th, 1891—its first recurrence after such action—reverently and generally observed throughout the State. The States
Edge Hill (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
Abbey and cast like rubbish into the church-yard of St. Margaret, yet to-day, could one produce but a link of the chain by which Cromwell's body was suspended from the gibbet on Tyburn Hill, it were prized as a precious relic worth a thousand times its weight in gold; for call him, as men may, rebel or lord protector, all England boasts of his name, his genius, and his glory, and her sons with equal pride trace their blood from the dashing cavaliers who rode with Essex and Prince Rupert at Edge Hill, and the God-fearing men who marched to victory with Cromwell at Marston Moor, or followed Hampden to death and defeat at Chalgrove. Thus it is that the fashion of this world passeth away, and the fashion of senseless fanatics in the pulpit who have been preaching a crusade of hate in the place of that dear Gospel of peace, which the blessed Saviour preached; the fashion of selfish politicians, who have pained the ears and vexed the hearts of all true patriots with their hypocritical ra
Rocketts (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
ered from right to left to balance the ship. Thoroughly soaked to the skin, we finally reached Old Point and safety in the morning. No one, perhaps, breathed freer than our captain of the boat. Leaving Old Point after a short stop, we reached Rocketts that afternoon. Arrival in Richmond. Could a picture have been taken of the men who arrived in Richmond from the prison-pens during those days, it would not be believed that the men who walked from the boat in Rocketts in June, 1865, werRocketts in June, 1865, were the proud soldier boys that left here in April, 1861. Silent, friendless, and sorrowful each one went his way. No welcome, no cheer awaited their return to this city and to their homes. Oh how few could boast of having homes! Nothing but ruins everywhere; but the man who was a good soldier generally proved himself to be a good citizen. The ruins are gone, war and desolation have passed—may it never return. I close with the following interesting statistics: The report of Mr. Stanton, as
Hertford (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
ee hundred infantry and our battery, numbering about one hundred and twenty-five men, was no light one. For weeks it had been in a state of constant activity and excitement, enhanced towards the last with continual suspense and anxiety. It had been constantly on the move to meet threatened advances from the directions of the Tar and lower Roanoke and the Chowan and Backwater rivers. If I remember aright, during the month of March it had been sent upon two expeditions through Northampton, Hertford and Bertie counties, to repel reported raids of the enemy's cavalry from the Chowan; one, to and below Tarboro to meet a threatened advance from the lower Tar and Roanoke, and one, down the Seaboard and Roanoke railroad towards Franklin, to check a cavalry raid from the Blackwater. This last expedition, however, was in April, the command returning to camp therefrom the night of April 6th. It was under command of Colonel Whitford, who had with him not to exceed two hundred infantry (about
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