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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Thomas J. Jackson. (search)
on, said: Why, President, don't you know Stonewall Jackson? This is our Stonewall Jackson. Mr. DaStonewall Jackson. Mr. Davis started to greet him, evidently as warmly as those he had just left, but the appearance of JackJackson stopped him, and when he got about a yard Mr. Davis halted and Jackson immediately brought his President Davis asking me to tell him how General Jackson was and sending some exceedingly kind and through Richmond. I had frequent talks with Jackson about the long ride which he took with only osupplies were all stored, General Lee ordered Jackson to stay on that side and attack McClellan if bivouac they were instructed that if they saw Jackson they should not cheer, and as he rode along is the way the name Stonewall originated. Jackson always insisted in talking to me that the namwould follow blindfolded. The cry that he (Jackson) had been educated at West Point and was indear him, and the aisles became crowded and General Jackson embarrassed. Presently he turned to me a[45 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Oil-Cloth coat in which Jackson received his mortal wound. (search)
seph Bryan and was sent to General Lee— the correspondence which followed. One of the most interesting relics of Stonewall Jackson was brought to light in the manner as narrated yesterday by Mr. Joseph Bryan, as follows: I was sent to my home repaired by turning down an additional hem. As soon as I saw the coat I was struck by the well known fact that Stonewall Jackson had been wounded in exactly that way-two bullets in the left arm, and I remarked upon this coincidence. Jones stated that he would not be surprised if it was General Jackson's coat, because the man who had brought it to him a day or two after the battle of Chancellorsville had stated that he had gotten it from where General Jackson was wounded, and brought itGeneral Jackson was wounded, and brought it away to sell, asking for it a peck of meal. This charge Jones said he considered unreasonable, and had refused to pay it, as the coat was badly mutilated and very bloody, but that he had finally agreed to take it for a gallon of meal, which was
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Joseph E. Johnston. (search)
on taking command of an army, shall at once, without more words, become a Robert E. Lee or Stonewall Jackson at the highest pinnacle of their earthly achievement? One might conclude, from the inclination expressed by some, to inaugurate the triumphs of Lee and Jackson at the portal of the Georgia campaign, that such inauguration was a matter of election and pure preference by ambitious minds; tlle were the consequences of Jackson's spring upon the rear of Pope and Hooker; and not because Jackson suffered himself to be in their predicament. The question presented to Johnston at Rocky Face was, not whether he would do like Stonewall Jackson, but whether he would deliberately do like the generals whom Stonewall Jackson defeated. Every man in authority is the shepherd of a trust; but Stonewall Jackson defeated. Every man in authority is the shepherd of a trust; but what so sacred as the general's-lives that will step to death at his bidding. Of all fiduciaries none has such account to render as he who is commissioned to wage the fight of a people. Human life
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), One who was out with old Stonewall. (search)
One who was out with old Stonewall. The moral influence of General Jackson. The issue of a new Life of Stonewall Jackson, from the pen of his wife, recalls attention to the remarkable personality of a man, for the like of whom we must go back to the times of Cromwell. He might have been one of Cromwell's ironsides, who fStonewall Jackson, from the pen of his wife, recalls attention to the remarkable personality of a man, for the like of whom we must go back to the times of Cromwell. He might have been one of Cromwell's ironsides, who feared no one but God, since he made war with tremendous vigor, and yet morning and evening had prayers in his tent as if he were the chaplain, instead of the general, of the army. This extraordinary character, produced an impression upon his soldiers which remains to this day, of which a gentleman of this city furnishes us an ill We sat in silence, and as soon as I could recover myself I whispered to my friend, Who can he be? to which he answered, I don't know, but he must be one of Stonewall Jackson's old soldiers. And he was! As we walked out into the open air I accosted our new acquaintance and, after a few questions about the country, asked: Were yo
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.60 (search)
e battle of Malvern Hill in 1862, when I was chief-of-staff to General Jackson's corps, that I am represented as crouching behind a large gat its correction. The authentic facts of the case are these: General Jackson was himself present during that terrible artillery fire, havined its extreme Calvinism. During the battle of Malvern Hill General Jackson rode, as was his wont, into the very hottest fire, and for somjor Nelson rode up to bring some message from General Ewell to General Jackson, and with a soldier's keen eye at once took in the situation. en that I alluded to you as a gallant and efficient officer on General Jackson's staff; that I say that General Jackson ordered his staff to General Jackson ordered his staff to dismount and shelter themselves; that I say that Dr. Dabney chanced to be near a very large, thick oak gatepost, and he very wisely got behinistianity—whose gallant and efficient service on the staff of Stonewall Jackson, and whose admirable biography of his chief, and able and una
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.62 (search)
rs was an extraordinary array of able men, John C. Breckinridge, Frank Cheathamn, Cleburne, Stevenson, John C. Brown, Walthall, Loring, Hindman, Wheeler, Porter, were there—and to-day assembled in the Senate are Morgan, Gibson, Cockrell, Eustace, Berry, Walthall and George, who were of that great army, and with them the noble war governor of Tennessee, Isham C. Harris. No such assemblage of men of intellect ever before controlled any army. Unfortunately Forrest, Frank Armstrong and Bud Jackson were not with Johnston then, or Sherman would never have made his cruel raid as he did. A striking proof of the greater tenacity of American troops is found in the fact that both sides held their ground in our battles two, three and more days. No European battle lasted more than one day except the one of Marlborough's, which was won on the second day. In the battle of Corinth, the First Division, Army of the West, went into action October 2d at ten A. M., with four thousand seven h
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Nineteenth of January. (search)
en who wore the gray will ever prove recreant to the principles that actuated them in time of war, but there is danger that our children may, and so we wish on these recurring anniversaries to tell of the chivalrous deeds of such leaders as Lee, Jackson, Stuart, and Pickett, and to teach coming generations that the soldiers of the Southern Confederacy were not rebels, but were Americans who loved constitutional liberty as something dearer than life itself. The orator. Dr. R. L. Mason, re ended at Waterloo. A cordon of skeletons still lie along this path of carnage to mark the steps where our brave defenders trod to do and dare for liberty and honor, led by our own Robert Edward Lee. They followed him, feeling as his great Lieutenant Jackson expressed it: He is the only man I would follow blindfolded. With the remnant of his army, without reinforcements, Lee held Grant at bay with his constantly accumulating forces and machinery of war for nine long months, on a line of defens
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Jefferson Davis. (search)
rgave his enemies, but bent to no one but God. In these pages have been recorded the deeds of the former leaders of the so-called army of the Rebellion, and short sketches of their lives given. We refer to the biographies of R. E. Lee, Stonewall Jackson, J. E. B. Stuart, Mosby, Forrest, etc. We believe that the President, prominent in position and revered by all the above-named generals in spite of manifold points of difference, is well worthy to be ranked among these portraits as origiircle of statesmen whom he had gathered about him were of the first rank, and the knights who sat at their round table have won for themselves imperishable renown. We recall the names of R. E. Lee, A. S. Johnston, Joe Johnston, Beauregard, Stonewall Jackson, the two Hills, Longstreet, Gordon and the dashing cavalryman Stuart, the two Lees, Ashby, Morgan. These will be named among the first as long as there is a history of war. And now the war! How fared it? Men are lacking, therefore mus
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index (search)
le, The British Iron-Clad, Description of, 32 Iron, Manufacture in Virginia, Early, 137. Jackson, General Thomas J., Characteristics of, 83; at prayer, 111, 161; personal reminiscences and ane McGregor's Battery, Roll of, 281. McGuire, Dr., Hunter, Sketch of, his reminiscenses of General Jackson, 298. McPhail, Major John B., 56. Manassas, History of, First Battle of, 81. Mauryaddress at Atlanta, Ga., 401. O'Hara, Colonel, Theodore, Sketch of, 275. One who was with Jackson, 370. Opie. Major J. N., How he led a Federal charge, 251 Owen, Fort, 68. Owen, Colonel,Hampton, 170; B F. Butler, John Pope, Sheridan, 171; Pleasanton, Hancock, Logan, 172; Stonewall Jackson, Stuart, McClellan, Kearney, 173; Ord, Wallace, Early, Banks, Terry, 174. Scheibert, Maj Address of General John B. Gordon to, 175. Vandever, Dr. J. L., 187. Valentine's Statue of Jackson, E. V., 300. Van Dorn, Recollections of General; his operations between Columbia and Nashvil
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