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Louisa (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.39
he returned to Virginia, to his old homestead in Orange county. His family residence is one of the old homesteads in this country that have been deeded from the crown by George III, and which has never passed from the possession of his family. Mr. Taliaferro never took an active part in politics until the Cleveland election in 1892. Last fall he entered into a contest with Mr. George Barbour, and during the present session he has made a very efficient and useful member of the House of Delegates. Among the bills of general importance which have been introduced by Mr. Taliaferro is one doing away with the evil of professional jurors in the various courts by allowing persons only to serve one term annually in the different courts. Another one of his bills requires county treasurers to give bonds furnished by security companies. He also is the father of a game law for the counties of Culpeper, Orange, Spotsylvania, Louisa, Stafford and King George, and of a road law for his county.
Malvern Hill (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.39
ll the cavalry battles and engagements of the cavalry of the Army of Northern Virginia, such as Brandy Station, Spotsylvania Courthouse, First and Second Manassas, Sharpsburg. He followed General Stuart around McClellan's army and assisted in the burning of all the supplies of the latter at Whitehouse. With two comrades, William Smoot, of Alexandria, and another one by the name of Green, he joined the Seventeenth Virginia Infantry and fought with them at Cold Harbor, Frazier's farm, and Malvern Hill. After the war Mr. Taliaferro went to Mississippi, where he taught school at Greenville, and from there he removed to Macon, Ga., and in 1870 to Savannah, where he conducted a private school until 1882. In October, 1881, he married a Miss Barclay, of Savannah, and upon the death of his wife in 1892 he returned to Virginia, to his old homestead in Orange county. His family residence is one of the old homesteads in this country that have been deeded from the crown by George III, and w
Greenville (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.39
as Brandy Station, Spotsylvania Courthouse, First and Second Manassas, Sharpsburg. He followed General Stuart around McClellan's army and assisted in the burning of all the supplies of the latter at Whitehouse. With two comrades, William Smoot, of Alexandria, and another one by the name of Green, he joined the Seventeenth Virginia Infantry and fought with them at Cold Harbor, Frazier's farm, and Malvern Hill. After the war Mr. Taliaferro went to Mississippi, where he taught school at Greenville, and from there he removed to Macon, Ga., and in 1870 to Savannah, where he conducted a private school until 1882. In October, 1881, he married a Miss Barclay, of Savannah, and upon the death of his wife in 1892 he returned to Virginia, to his old homestead in Orange county. His family residence is one of the old homesteads in this country that have been deeded from the crown by George III, and which has never passed from the possession of his family. Mr. Taliaferro never took an act
Fauquier (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.39
Yorktown, the Black Horse, being familiar with the counties of Prince William, Fauquier, and Culpeper, through which the army was about to cross, and having a completlliam and Mary College as students, and knew the roads as well as their own in Fauquier. The Black Horse took part in the raid around McClellan, simply for observati-‘63, the Black Horse occupied their native heath, and scouted the counties of Fauquier and Stafford thoroughly, reporting all the movements of the enemy to Generals harm. Mr. Hugh Hamilton, an old Black Horseman, who is now treasurer of Fauquier county, in relating his reminiscences of those times, said the other day with a t present members of the House of Delegates, namely, Messrs. T. C. Pilcher, of Fauquier; Richard Lewis, of Culpeper, and Charles C. Talliaferro, of Orange. Mr. Pilf Delegates from Culpeper county, was born in 1838, in the adjoining county of Fauquier, and was actively engaged in farming until the outbreak of the war, when he en
Macon (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.39
se, First and Second Manassas, Sharpsburg. He followed General Stuart around McClellan's army and assisted in the burning of all the supplies of the latter at Whitehouse. With two comrades, William Smoot, of Alexandria, and another one by the name of Green, he joined the Seventeenth Virginia Infantry and fought with them at Cold Harbor, Frazier's farm, and Malvern Hill. After the war Mr. Taliaferro went to Mississippi, where he taught school at Greenville, and from there he removed to Macon, Ga., and in 1870 to Savannah, where he conducted a private school until 1882. In October, 1881, he married a Miss Barclay, of Savannah, and upon the death of his wife in 1892 he returned to Virginia, to his old homestead in Orange county. His family residence is one of the old homesteads in this country that have been deeded from the crown by George III, and which has never passed from the possession of his family. Mr. Taliaferro never took an active part in politics until the Cleveland
Culpeper (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.39
party, and his influence is felt as soon as he rises in his seat to give the House his counsel and advice on any measure in which he takes an interest. Richard Lewis. Mr. Richard Lewis, the present member of the House of Delegates from Culpeper county, was born in 1838, in the adjoining county of Fauquier, and was actively engaged in farming until the outbreak of the war, when he enlisted in the Black Horse Battalion, going at once to the scene of the John Brown raid. Immediately after tnto that county, where he has successfully followed the fortunes of a farmer. In the primary election last fall he was the Democratic nominee for the seat in the House of Delegates. Colonel J. Catlett Gibson, the former representative of Culpeper county in the House, ran against him as an independent candidate, but was defeated. While Mr. Lewis is not much given to public speaking on account of his modest and retiring disposition, yet he is well known to all connected with the General Asse
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.39
holiday soldiers, so gay were they in demeanor, and so well groomed were their horses. At the second battle of Manassas, they were engaged in carrying General Jackson's orders to and fro between the various commanders of the troops in action, thus witnessing and bearing their part in that famous struggle, when a number of the corps were seriously wounded and several killed. Two privates of the Black Horse offered their beautiful chargers to Generals Lee and Jackson when they marched into Maryland. In the first Maryland campaign, before General Jackson's corps entered Boonesboro, he sent a squad of the Black Horse, commanded by Lieutenant A. D. Payne, through the town to picket the approaches from the opposite direction. Lieutenant Payne had nineteen men and the charge was against twenty times their number, but General Jackson was saved from capture. It was a desperate charge and the enemy was deceived and routed. Payne remarked to his men: We must relieve our general at all ha
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.39
The Black Horse Troop. [from the Richmond (Va.) times, Feb. 23, 1896.] the members of the House of Delegates, who served in the famous body. Pilcher, Lewis and Talliaferro. All fade enviable Records in the daring and gallant band of soldiers-a brief Sketch of the Black Horse and its commanders. One of the most gallant, serviceable, and picturesque contingents of the Army of Northern Virginia, was that famous company of cavalry known as the Black Horse Troop, which won such bright laurels for its daring exploits, and the valuable information and aid it rendeered the Confederate commanders in some of the greatest engagements of the Civil war. In many respects it was a remarable body of men, composed as it was, of handsome, strapping, debonair Virginians, admirably horsed and equipped, in whose natures the spirit of chivalry was an abiding trait that marked the flight of their banner from the outbreak to the close of the war. They wielded their sabres like the cuirassiers of
Brandy Station (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.39
his life. At the breaking out of the civil war he entered the army before he was eighteen years old. On July 1, 1861, he enlisted in the First Company, Richmond Howitzers, but was transferred in October following to the Black Horse Battalion, where he remained for two years. He then joined Co. F, of the Sixth Virginia Cavalry, where he remained until the close of the war. He participated in all the cavalry battles and engagements of the cavalry of the Army of Northern Virginia, such as Brandy Station, Spotsylvania Courthouse, First and Second Manassas, Sharpsburg. He followed General Stuart around McClellan's army and assisted in the burning of all the supplies of the latter at Whitehouse. With two comrades, William Smoot, of Alexandria, and another one by the name of Green, he joined the Seventeenth Virginia Infantry and fought with them at Cold Harbor, Frazier's farm, and Malvern Hill. After the war Mr. Taliaferro went to Mississippi, where he taught school at Greenville, and
Warrenton (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.39
e a watchword for danger and a signal for action with the Union troops. The Black Horse was organized in 1859, just two years before the war broke out, and first figured at Harper's Ferry in the John Brown raid. Colonel John Scott, of Warrenton, Virginia, was its first captain, and gave the troop its name. Colonel Scott, who has retired from active life, was for many years a conspicuous figure in that section of the State as Commonwealth's Attorney, and is well known as the author of The lamented in Virginia, had achieved distinction and success as a lawyer, and a brilliant tribute to his memory by the members of the Warrenton bar appears on the minutes of the court. At the close of the war, when the Black Horse disbanded at Warrenton, General Payne delivered a valedictory to the men from his saddle, which is said, by those who were present, to have been a gem of emotional eloquence. Three members in the House. The above brief outline of the history of the famous Black
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