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Donelson (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.58
g, snowing, and freezing, accompanied by a sharp wind. With considerable difficulty we succeeded in procuring some fuel to make fires to keep from freezing. We had no tents, and suffered intensely from exposure and want of adequate rations. We had to make fires to warm ourselves, occasionally, in ravines and places where the enemy could not observe the light from our fires. I understood that a number of soldiers froze to death in the breastworks. This condition confronted us while at Donelson. About 4 o'clock the next morning the battery was ordered on the left of the army. Owing to the proximity of the enemy this movement had to be executed with caution and as quietly as possible. Although the undertaking was one fraught with difficulty and danger, yet we succeeded in obtaining a position about the dawn of day, and hastily threw up light earthworks, which was very difficult to do in consequence of the frozen condition of the ground. During the day several of General Fores
Lookout Mountain, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.58
gage-wagons. The baggage had been destroyed at Dover, Tenn. One of these wagons was loaded with coffee, and the other with some provisions brought from Nashville, which were subsequently turned over to the commissary at Norristown, Tenn. We were pleased to meet four members of our battery, who were left in charge of these wagons. During our travel through Tennessee, the people were very hospitable to us. We marched from there to Chattanooga, and encamped about one week at the base of Lookout Mountain. We then took the cars to Knoxville, and remained here a week, and then marched across the Cumberland mountains to Morristown, Tenn., thence by rail to Virginia, and arrived in Abingdon, Va., the latter part of March, 1862. Upon our arrival in Abingdon we were much surprised on being informed that General Floyd had been relieved of his command by President Davis, and Colonel Stuart, of the Fifty-sixth Virginia Regiment, was commandant of the post. The command of General Floyd was
Abingdon, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.58
oga, and encamped about one week at the base of Lookout Mountain. We then took the cars to Knoxville, and remained here a week, and then marched across the Cumberland mountains to Morristown, Tenn., thence by rail to Virginia, and arrived in Abingdon, Va., the latter part of March, 1862. Upon our arrival in Abingdon we were much surprised on being informed that General Floyd had been relieved of his command by President Davis, and Colonel Stuart, of the Fifty-sixth Virginia Regiment, was coAbingdon we were much surprised on being informed that General Floyd had been relieved of his command by President Davis, and Colonel Stuart, of the Fifty-sixth Virginia Regiment, was commandant of the post. The command of General Floyd was soon ordered to the Army of Northern Virginia. Subsequently General Floyd commanded State troops in Southwest Virginia. My company having been captured at Fort Donelson, and not having any command to report to, I was tendered a position by the medical director of my brigade in his department, which I accepted, and held for some time. Finally, my company was exchanged, and I rejoined it at Chaffin's Bluff, about ten miles below Richmo
Clarksville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.58
us. Among the number I remember the names of Mrs. Caldwell and Mrs. Mason, whose kind attention to us was highly appreciated. One of my battery—Jack Brooks—died here of typhoid fever, and another one—Charles Palmore—died at Bowling Green, I think, of congestion of the lungs; Captain Patterson, of the 56th Virginia Regiment, of my brigade, also died in Russellville, Ky. From Russellville, Ky., General Floyd's Brigade was sent to Fort Donelson, Tennessee. My battery proceeded to Clarksville, Tennessee, from which point we could occasionally hear the reports of heavy artillery in the direction of Donelson, like muttering thunder in the distance. We remained here a day or two, and then marched to Cumberland City, a small boat-landing on the river, from where we were conveyed by a steamer to Fort Donelson, leaving all our baggage behind, which we never saw again. We reached our destination Thursday evening, February 13, 1862. Annoyed by shells. Upon our arrival at the wharf
Knoxville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.58
yed at Dover, Tenn. One of these wagons was loaded with coffee, and the other with some provisions brought from Nashville, which were subsequently turned over to the commissary at Norristown, Tenn. We were pleased to meet four members of our battery, who were left in charge of these wagons. During our travel through Tennessee, the people were very hospitable to us. We marched from there to Chattanooga, and encamped about one week at the base of Lookout Mountain. We then took the cars to Knoxville, and remained here a week, and then marched across the Cumberland mountains to Morristown, Tenn., thence by rail to Virginia, and arrived in Abingdon, Va., the latter part of March, 1862. Upon our arrival in Abingdon we were much surprised on being informed that General Floyd had been relieved of his command by President Davis, and Colonel Stuart, of the Fifty-sixth Virginia Regiment, was commandant of the post. The command of General Floyd was soon ordered to the Army of Northern Vi
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.58
eesboroa. Near Murfreesboroa, on the macadamized road, we (four of my battery) were fortunate enough to find two of our company's baggage-wagons. The baggage had been destroyed at Dover, Tenn. One of these wagons was loaded with coffee, and the other with some provisions brought from Nashville, which were subsequently turned over to the commissary at Norristown, Tenn. We were pleased to meet four members of our battery, who were left in charge of these wagons. During our travel through Tennessee, the people were very hospitable to us. We marched from there to Chattanooga, and encamped about one week at the base of Lookout Mountain. We then took the cars to Knoxville, and remained here a week, and then marched across the Cumberland mountains to Morristown, Tenn., thence by rail to Virginia, and arrived in Abingdon, Va., the latter part of March, 1862. Upon our arrival in Abingdon we were much surprised on being informed that General Floyd had been relieved of his command by Pre
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.58
ned here a week, and then marched across the Cumberland mountains to Morristown, Tenn., thence by rail to Virginia, and arrived in Abingdon, Va., the latter part of March, 1862. Upon our arrival in Abingdon we were much surprised on being informed that General Floyd had been relieved of his command by President Davis, and Colonel Stuart, of the Fifty-sixth Virginia Regiment, was commandant of the post. The command of General Floyd was soon ordered to the Army of Northern Virginia. Subsequently General Floyd commanded State troops in Southwest Virginia. My company having been captured at Fort Donelson, and not having any command to report to, I was tendered a position by the medical director of my brigade in his department, which I accepted, and held for some time. Finally, my company was exchanged, and I rejoined it at Chaffin's Bluff, about ten miles below Richmond, Va. Thomas J. Riddell, M. D., Private in Goochland Artillery, Floyd's Brigade, late C. S. A., Richmond, Va.
Cumberland River (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.58
er. I anxiously awaited its return, but, instead of coming near me, as I expected, it stopped about 100 yards above where I was standing. Several thousand soldiers had now congregated at the wharf, and the possibility of my escape seemed very improbable. To force my way through this immense body of men was impossible. This was a predicament, indeed, delay was dangerous. I at once resolved, if possible, to get on board of that steamer. The only chance was for me to wade the surging Cumberland river for same distance. Whether justifiable or not, I had a horrid conception of being captured and subjected to the horrors of a prison pen. I proceeded to make my way in the direction of the steamer, keeping as near as possible to the bank of the river, though up to my waist in mud and water, and coming in contact with melting snow and ice the most of the time. After no little perseverance I succeeded in accomplishing my object, though before reaching the steamer I was nearly over my sh
Fort Donelson (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.58
rkable and exciting Incidents–Surrender of Fort Donelson. To the Editor of the Dispatch: , General Floyd's Brigade was sent to Fort Donelson, Tennessee. My battery proceeded to Clarksvillerom where we were conveyed by a steamer to Fort Donelson, leaving all our baggage behind, which we ts made a desperate and powerful attack on Fort Donelson. The cannonading was terrific and incessarals Floyd and Pillow, on the steamer from Fort Donelson, to Nashville, Tennessee, February 16, 186d to perform that duty, and he surrendered Fort Donelson to General U. S. Grant on the morning of ter of them were exchanged. The capture of Fort Donelson was one of General Grant's first importantls Floyd and Pillow made their escape from Fort Donelson and reached Nashville the next morning. of Nashville in consequence of the fall of Fort Donelson. Hopes were entertained by many of the cinia. My company having been captured at Fort Donelson, and not having any command to report to,
Russellville (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.58
anuary, 1862, General Johnston's command was ordered to other sections of country; the most of his army was sent to Shiloh, Miss.; General Floyd's Brigade to Russellville, Ky. My battery encamped here about ten days. Several of us were temporarily indisposed, probably for one week, and were quartered in an old church. During the tone—Charles Palmore—died at Bowling Green, I think, of congestion of the lungs; Captain Patterson, of the 56th Virginia Regiment, of my brigade, also died in Russellville, Ky. From Russellville, Ky., General Floyd's Brigade was sent to Fort Donelson, Tennessee. My battery proceeded to Clarksville, Tennessee, from which point wRussellville, Ky., General Floyd's Brigade was sent to Fort Donelson, Tennessee. My battery proceeded to Clarksville, Tennessee, from which point we could occasionally hear the reports of heavy artillery in the direction of Donelson, like muttering thunder in the distance. We remained here a day or two, and then marched to Cumberland City, a small boat-landing on the river, from where we were conveyed by a steamer to Fort Donelson, leaving all our baggage behind, which we ne
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