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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Meridian (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.14
h Richmond. Here, in reply to a dispatch to Richmond, I was directed to assume command of the Department of Alabama, Mississippi, etc., with headquarters at Meridian, Miss., and was informed that President Davis would, at an early day, meet me at Montgomery, Ala. The military situation was as follows: Sherman occupied Atlan repulsing an assault, General Maury, in accordance with instructions, withdrew his garrison in the night to Mobile, and then evacuated the city, falling back to Meridian, on the line of the Mobile and Ohio Railway. General Forrest was drawn to the same point, and the little army, less than eight thousand of all arms, was held in ishing the latter with currency, of which they were destitute—and friendly relations promoted. These suggestions were adopted, and a day or two thereafter, at Meridian, a note was received from General Canby, inclosing copies of orders to Generals Granger and Steele, commanding army corps, by which it appeared these officers we
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.14
rovided for the men. All this under my control and supervision. Here a curious incident may be mentioned. At an early period of the war, when Colonel Sidney Johnston retired to the south of the Tennessee river, Isham G. Harris, Governor of Tennessee, accompanied him, taking at the same time the coin from the vaults of the State Bank of Tennessee, at Nashville. This coin, in the immediate charge of a bonded officer of the bank, had occasioned much solicitude to the Governor in his many wanTennessee, at Nashville. This coin, in the immediate charge of a bonded officer of the bank, had occasioned much solicitude to the Governor in his many wanderings. He appealed to me to assist in the restoration of the coin to the bank. At my request General Canby detailed an officer and escort, and the money reached the bank intact. This is the Governor Harris who was afterwards elected to the United States Senate. After the war. The condition of the people of Alabama and Mississippi was at this time deplorable. The waste of war had stripped large areas of the necessaries of life. In view of this I suggested to General Canby that his t
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.14
the waning fortunes of the cause and the honor of its arms might demand. Soldierly courtesy. Intelligence of Lee's surrender reached us. Staff officers from Johnston and Sherman came across the country to inform Canby and myself of their Convention. Whereupon an interview was arranged between us to determine a course of action, and a place selected ten miles north of Mobile, near the railway. Accompanied by a staff officer, Colonel Wm. M. Levy (afterwards a member of Congress from Louisiana), and making use of a hand-car, I reached the appointed spot, and found General Canby, with a large escort and many staff and other officers. Among these I recognized some old friends, notably General Canby, himself, and General James Palmer. All extended cordial greeting. A few moments of private conversation with Canby led to the establishment of a truce, to await further intelligence from the North. Forty-eight hours notice was to be given by the party desiring to terminate the
Alabama river (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.14
that his government disavowed the Johnston-Sherman Convention, and it would be his duty to resume hostilities. Almost at the same instant came the news of Johnston's surrender. There was no more room for hesitancy. Folly and madness combined would not have justified an attempt to prolong a hopeless contest. General Canby was informed that I desired to meet him for the purpose of negotiating a surrender of my forces, and that Commodore Farrand, commanding the armed vessels in the Alabama river, desired to meet Rear Admiral Thatcher for a similar purpose. Citronville, some forty miles north of Mobile, was the appointed place, and there, in the early days of May, 1865, the great war virtually ended. After this no hostile gun was fired, and the authority of the United States was supreme in the land. Conditions of surrender were speedily determined, and of a character to soothe the pride of the vanquished: Officers to retain sidearms, troops to turn in arms and equipments
Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.14
cent works, with Commodore Farrand, Confederate Navy, in charge of several armed vessels. Small bodies of troops were stationed at different points through the Department, and Major-General Forrest, with his division of cavalry, was in Northeast Mississippi. Directing this latter officer to move his command across the Tennessee river, and use every effort to intercept Sherman's communications south of Nashville, I proceeded to Mobile to inspect the fortifications; thence to Montgomery, to ms of the great drama succeeded each other with startling rapidity. Sherman marched, unopposed, to the sea, Hood was driven from Nashville across the Tennessee river, and asked to be relieved. Assigned to this duty I met him near Tupelo, North Mississippi, and witnessed the melancholy spectacle presented by a retreating army. Guns, small arms and accoutrements lost, men without shoes or blankets, and this in a winter of unusual severity in that latitude. Making every effort to re-equip his
Selma (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.14
of unusual severity in that latitude. Making every effort to re-equip his force, I suggested to General Lee, then commanding all the armies of the Confederacy, that it should be moved to the Carolinas, to interpose between Sherman's advance and his (Lee's) lines of supply, and, in the last necessity, of retreat. The suggestion was adopted, and this force so moved. General Wilson, with a well-appointed and ably-led command of Federal cavalry, moved rapidly through North Alabama, seized Selma, and turning east to Montgomery, continued into Georgia. General Canby, commanding the Union armies in the Southwest, advanced up the eastern shore of Mobile bay, and invested Spanish Fort and Blakely, important Confederate works in that quarter. After repulsing an assault, General Maury, in accordance with instructions, withdrew his garrison in the night to Mobile, and then evacuated the city, falling back to Meridian, on the line of the Mobile and Ohio Railway. General Forrest was dra
Spanish Fort (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.14
he Carolinas, to interpose between Sherman's advance and his (Lee's) lines of supply, and, in the last necessity, of retreat. The suggestion was adopted, and this force so moved. General Wilson, with a well-appointed and ably-led command of Federal cavalry, moved rapidly through North Alabama, seized Selma, and turning east to Montgomery, continued into Georgia. General Canby, commanding the Union armies in the Southwest, advanced up the eastern shore of Mobile bay, and invested Spanish Fort and Blakely, important Confederate works in that quarter. After repulsing an assault, General Maury, in accordance with instructions, withdrew his garrison in the night to Mobile, and then evacuated the city, falling back to Meridian, on the line of the Mobile and Ohio Railway. General Forrest was drawn to the same point, and the little army, less than eight thousand of all arms, was held in readiness to discharge such duties as the waning fortunes of the cause and the honor of its arms
Woodville (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.14
All the fortified forts on the river were held by the Federals, and the intermediate portions of the stream closely guarded by gunboats to impede and, if possible, prevent passage. This delayed the transmission of the order above mentioned until August, when I crossed at a point just above the mouth of the Red river. On a dark night, in a small canoe, with horses swimming alongside, I got over without attracting the attention of a gunboat anchored a short distance below. Woodville, Wilkinson county, Miss., was the nearest place in telegraphic communication with Richmond. Here, in reply to a dispatch to Richmond, I was directed to assume command of the Department of Alabama, Mississippi, etc., with headquarters at Meridian, Miss., and was informed that President Davis would, at an early day, meet me at Montgomery, Ala. The military situation was as follows: Sherman occupied Atlanta, Hood lying some distance to the southwest; Farragut had forced the defenses of Mobile bay,
Jefferson Davis (search for this): chapter 1.14
arest place in telegraphic communication with Richmond. Here, in reply to a dispatch to Richmond, I was directed to assume command of the Department of Alabama, Mississippi, etc., with headquarters at Meridian, Miss., and was informed that President Davis would, at an early day, meet me at Montgomery, Ala. The military situation was as follows: Sherman occupied Atlanta, Hood lying some distance to the southwest; Farragut had forced the defenses of Mobile bay, capturing Fort Morgan, etc. Directing this latter officer to move his command across the Tennessee river, and use every effort to intercept Sherman's communications south of Nashville, I proceeded to Mobile to inspect the fortifications; thence to Montgomery, to meet President Davis. The interview extended over many hours, and the military situation was freely discussed. Our next meeting was at Fortress Monre, where, during his confinement, I obtained permission to visit him. The closing scenes of the great drama
E. R. Canby (search for this): chapter 1.14
time before his death. His meeting with General Canby. To write an impartial and unprejudicedto Montgomery, continued into Georgia. General Canby, commanding the Union armies in the Southwr, I reached the appointed spot, and found General Canby, with a large escort and many staff and otese I recognized some old friends, notably General Canby, himself, and General James Palmer. All e A few moments of private conversation with Canby led to the establishment of a truce, to await playing Hail, Columbia. Excusing himself, General Canby walked to the door. The music ceased for gentler act of courtesie. Warmly thanking General Canby for his delicate consideration, I asked fo attempt to prolong a hopeless contest. General Canby was informed that I desired to meet him foon of the coin to the bank. At my request General Canby detailed an officer and escort, and the moter, at Meridian, a note was received from General Canby, inclosing copies of orders to Generals Gr[3 more...]
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