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ated statements of the commanding general, the Thirteenth Maine regiment held the posts of honor in the Department of the Gulf. On the twenty-eighth of April Colonel Dow was promoted to brigadier-general, and Lieutenant-Colonel Rust succeeded to the command of the regiment. Shortly after our arrival on Ship Island, I was detailed in the adjutant's office. Adjutant Speed was promoted to captain and assigned to General Dow's staff as acting assistant adjutant-general. Sergeant-Major Wilson was promoted to adjutant, and I was warranted to rattle around in the office vacated by him. And I found it no sinecure, for during the absence of the adjutant on seve Later I served in the same capacity at Fort St. Philip and in New Orleans. The post—Forts Jackson and St. Philip—was commanded, for a short time, by Brigadier-General Neal Dow. Here altogether new responsibilities were thrust upon us. Vessels, and crafts of every description, passing up and down the river, were required by de
Jesse Smith (search for this): chapter 11
n where he belonged, and detail the best officer he had, as he was originally ordered to do. The colonel was somewhat scared. I was happy. Please leave the report with me, I said, and I will trump the general's trick. Since I have been kicked by a government mule, I don't shy at trifles. The second report proved sufficient to bring the inspector-general of the defences of New Orleans down upon me about five o'clock one Saturday afternoon. Before going to headquarters, the inspector, Colonel Smith, with whom I was well acquainted, called on me, and in his peculiar way informed me of the object of his visit. You and I, he began, are in the same boat. The general alleges that you falsely report that the five Dahlgren gun-carriages are liable to collapse at the first or second discharge of the gun; that the plank gun foundations of the batteries are rotten and unsafe. The general is mad at you, and he is wrathy with me for saying to him that I knew you personally, and that you wer
f many an upheaval; but I question if New Orleans, as a whole, ever before, or since, got into such a scrape, or had so happy an issue out of a deplorable condition. Of course the gallant action of our fleet in forcing its way past these forts, and dealing with the rebel crafts above, was a theme on which it was our delight to dwell, and from which we gathered inspiration. The gunboat Varuna sunk or disabled six of her antagonists before she received her mortal wound; but the gallant Captain Boggs ran his sinking ship to the bank and tied her to a tree, and saved every soul aboard. The trucks of the bow gun-carriage were under water when the gun fired its last shot. When I climbed to her half-submerged deck a few months afterwards, I instinctively took off my cap in salute of the flag that once proudly floated at her peak, but was not hauled down in token of surrender. But the tangible reminder of all the gallant deeds performed in connection with the capture of the forts render
Tom Sherman (search for this): chapter 11
will give me a cursing that will be heard in Washington. The first steamer from New Orleans brought every article for which I had made requisition—not omitting the garrison gin and gin-sling, which were not brought in bottles. I guess old Tom Sherman knows you, was the colonel's comment as the stores were landed on the wharf. I apprehend he will know me before he is done with me, I replied, for I have a report on the condition of the batteries which I would like to have you sign and transarge; three carriages at the second, and one carriage at the third discharge. You have redeemed your promise; and it is the best Sunday job I have ever seen, was the inspector's comment. In recognition of my Sunday's work of destruction, General Sherman sent to our post the Second Ohio Light Battery. And I served as ordnance officer till the regiment was mustered out of service. Although my second tour of duty on Ship Island was of rather a sober character, yet we occasionally had somew
Jefferson Davis (search for this): chapter 11
the solicitude I had manifested for their comfort during the night trip to New Orleans; adding that it was a continuation of the uniform kindness and consideration that had been extended to them on the island. According to a provision in Jefferson Davis' Proclamation, if captured, I would have been reserved for execution. That Proclamation of Jeff. Davis, promulgated on the twenty-third day of December, 1862, is a piece of the most villainous writing that has ever been brought to my noticeJeff. Davis, promulgated on the twenty-third day of December, 1862, is a piece of the most villainous writing that has ever been brought to my notice. And I believe it to be an historical fact that the author of it died without a country. By a singular fatality, the close of the War of the Rebellion found me, after many changes of location, on duty on the desolate island where I first landed more than three years before. But in our department there were still loose and ragged ends of the rebellion that required special attention; and the well-seasoned Seventy-fourth Regiment, U. S. C. I., was one of the regiments retained to perform du
Orleans, save the river above the city, and Farragut the Superb was competent to attend to that approach. According to the repeated statements of the commanding general, the Thirteenth Maine regiment held the posts of honor in the Department of the Gulf. On the twenty-eighth of April Colonel Dow was promoted to brigadier-general, and Lieutenant-Colonel Rust succeeded to the command of the regiment. Shortly after our arrival on Ship Island, I was detailed in the adjutant's office. Adjutant Speed was promoted to captain and assigned to General Dow's staff as acting assistant adjutant-general. Sergeant-Major Wilson was promoted to adjutant, and I was warranted to rattle around in the office vacated by him. And I found it no sinecure, for during the absence of the adjutant on several occasions, the entire duties of the office devolved on me. When the three companies were transferred to Fort Jackson, I was detailed as acting adjutant of the post. Later I served in the same capa
ns left their bed, out of the darkness (we were working by night) came the warning, Captain, come out of the battery, or we'll have a funeral. Only one, I said, for I would allow no one in the battery with me. I will admit that I laid my hands very gingerly on the huge gun as I swung it into position to lower it into the trunnion beds of the old ship's gun-carriage placed on the parapet to receive it. All chatter had ceased. As gently as a sleeping infant would be placed in its crib, this Parrott was lowered to its improvised carriage and eased down the slope of the sand battery and on to the board track on which it was to be transported to the wharf a mile away. Now a question that had been put to me a hundred times, What are you going to do with those old boards? was answered by the screaking trucks of a resurrected gun-carriage, as a jolly set of boys seized the dragrope and walked away with the gun, while boarders were called away to shift track. At eleven o'clock at night (
rience of a Union Veteran By Levi Lindley Hawes (Continued.) About the middle of April General Butler learned that Farragut's fleet had crossed the bar and was ready to proceed up the Mississippi. Six regiments and two batteries were immediategh about sixty miles away—we heard the gentle voice of Porter's fifteen-inch mortars. Then came the cheering account of Farragut's passing the forts—Jackson and St. Philip—and later the landing of General Butler in New Orleans on the first of May. e wretches. Within a few weeks after our arrival, the Hartford and Brooklyn dropped anchor off the forts. It was Admiral Farragut's first and only visit after the capture, and as he remained over night, the garrisons proceeded to burn powder and old me that the company to which I had been assigned at Ship Island was under orders to proceed to Mobile Bay, where Admiral Farragut was making preparations to attack the forts. Glory! Hallelujah! I shouted. The astonished major said, What! are <
ough rebel sources (sources, by the way, through which we received much information of the doings in Washington)—that General Banks had been ordered to relieve General Butler. On Sunday, December 14, 1862, General Banks and his fleet of transports General Banks and his fleet of transports passed the forts. Mobile and Texas, so ran the rumor, are to be annexed at once. We hoped to be included in the annexation business. But the programme was materially modified. About three months later I received a letter from General Dudley's aden of the city. Late one afternoon the orderly at our headquarters hutriedly entered the office, saying, Adjutant, General Banks is on the sidewalk, and he desires to see you. As I presented myself, the general put his arm through mine and invitves as would-be fighters, we yet constituted a happy family. The Twentieth Regiment Corps d'afrique—so re-named by General Banks—was organized by General Butler from the First and Second Regiments, Louisiana Native Guards, which left the rebel s
this waiting-to-be-blest section. Finally the general before Mobile sent an order for our two 100-pounder Parrott guns. The colonel told the officer who brought the order that the guns were about a mile from the wharf, and that, for lack of facilities, he could neither dismount them nor transport them to the wharf. But we must have them. The general's orders are imperative, insisted the officer. The colonel sent for me to corroborate his statement. The two officers chanced to be Americans by brevet, as it were. After some little discussion, I said, Gentlemen, I am a Yankee, and I beg you will allow me to retire to my quarters and do a bit of thinking. I found my room crowded with officers curious to know what was up. Gentlemen, I said, please ask me no question, but leave me alone for ten minutes. My lieutenant sprang to his feet and said, Boys, get out of here. The captain's got something in his head. Laughing at tile lieutenant's drollery, they all retired. In less
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