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Amsterdam (Netherlands) (search for this): chapter 12
ed, it seemed impossible to punish and imprison wives and children for no other crime than Chap. VIII.} 1608. that they would not part from their husbands and fathers. They could not be sent home, for they had no homes to go to; so that, at last, the magistrates were glad to be rid of them on any terms, though, in the mean time, they, poor souls, endured misery enough. Such was the flight of Robinson and Brewster, and their followers, from the land of their fathers. Their arrival in Amsterdam, in 1608, was but the beginning of their wanderings. They knew they were Pilgrims, and looked not much on those things, but lifted up their eyes to heaven, their dearest country, and quieted their spirits. In 1609, removing to 1609. Leyden, they saw poverty coming on them like an armed man; but, being careful to keep their word and painful and diligent in their callings, they attained a comfortable condition, grew in the gifts and grace of the Spirit of God, and lived together in peace
Bristol (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 12
r success in establishing colonies. The Spaniards, affecting an exclusive right of navigation in the seas of the new hemisphere, captured and confiscated a vessel Purchas, IV. 1827 and 1832, and ff. Gorges' Briefe Narration, c. IV. Prince's N. E. Chronology, 113,114. u. Mass. Hist. Coll. IX. 3, 4. which Nov 10 Popham, the chief justice of England, and Gorges, the governor of Plymouth, had, with some others, equipped for discovery. But a second and almost simultaneous expedition from Bristol encountered no disasters; and the voyagers, on their return, increased public confidence, by renewing the favorable reports of the country which they had visited. Gorges, c. v. 6. The spirit of adventure was not suffered to slumber; the lord chief justice displayed persevering vigor, for his honor was interested in the success of the company which his influence had contributed to establish; Gorges, The name of Gorges occurs in Hume, c. XLIV.; Lingard, VIII. 449. Compare Belknap's Bio
Devonshire (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 12
rty of his subjects, some of them members of his household and his government, the most wealthy Chap. VIII.} 1620. and powerful of the English nobility, a patent, Trumbull's Connecticut, i. 546—567. Hazard, i. 103—118. Baylies, i. 160—185. Compare Hubbard, c. XXX.; Chalmers, 81—85. which 1620. in American annals, and even in the history of the world, has but one parallel. The adventurers and their successors were incorporated as The Council established at Plymouth, in the county of Devon, for the planting, ruling, ordering and governing New England, in America. The territory conferred on the patentees in absolute property, with unlimited jurisdiction, the sole powers of legislation, the appointment of all officers and all forms of government, extended, in breadth, from the fortieth to the forty-eighth degree of north latitude, and, in length, from the Atlantic to the Pacific; that is to say, nearly all the inhabited British possessions to the north of the United States, al
Glocester (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
rdness of tile reformation in England; Calvin wrote in the same strain. Hallam's England, i. 140. When Hooper, who had gone into exile in So Cartwright, a few years later, in his Reply to Whitgift, 27: In matters of the church, there may be nothing done but by the word of the God. In his Sec. Reply, 1575, p. 81. It is not enough, that the Scripture speaketh not against them ,unless it speak for them. the latter years of Henry VIII., was appointed bishop Chap. VIII.} 1550 July. of Gloucester, he, for a time, refused Strype's Memorials, II. 226, and 113. Repository, II. 118—132. Hallam, i. 141. Neal's Puritans, i. 108—Prince, 282—307. Prince has written with great diligence and distinctness. to be consecrated in the vestments which the law required; and his refusal marks the era when the Puritans first existed as a separate party. They demanded a thorough reform the established church desired to check the propensity to change. The strict party repelled all union with t<
St. George, W. Va. (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
with a government framed as if for a permanent colony. Rude cabins, a storehouse, and some slight fortifications, were rapidly prepared, and the ships sailed for England, leaving forty-five Dec. 5. emigrants in the plantation, which was named St. George. But the winter was intensely cold; the natives, at first friendly, became restless; the storehouse caught fire, and part of the provisions was consumed; the emigrants grew weary of their solitude; they lost Popham, their president, the only o—an error. of the company that died there; the ships which revisited the settlement with supplies, brought news of 1608. the death of the chief justice, the most vigorous friend of the settlement in England; and Gilbert, the sole in command at St. George, had, by the decease of his brother, become heir to an estate which invited his presence. So the plantation was abandoned; and the colonists, returning to England, did coyne many excuses, and sought to conceal their own deficiency of spirit by
Port Royal (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
The American fisheries also constituted a prosperous and well-established business. Three years had elapsed since the French had been settled in their huts at Port Royal; and the ships which carried the English from the Kennebec were on the ocean at the same time with the little squadron of the French, who succeeded in building a title which Chap. VIII} Prince Charles confirmed. The French could boast, with truth, that New France had been colonized before New England obtained a name; Port Royal was older than Plymouth, Quebec than Boston. Yet the voyage was not free from crime. After Smith had departed for England, Thomas Hunt, the master of the secoe, with the ocean on one side and the wilderness on the other. There were none to show them kindness or bid them welcome. The nearest French settlement was at Port Royal; it was five hundred miles to the English plantation at Virginia. As they attempted to disembark, the water was found so shallow, that they were forced to wade
Newfoundland (Canada) (search for this): chapter 12
computation far below the truth. much more than a million of square miles, and capable of sustaining far more than two hundred millions of inhabitants, were, by a single signature of King James, given away to a corporation within the realm, composed of but forty individuals. The grant was absolute and exclusive: it conceded the land and islands; the rivers and the harbors; the mines and the fisheries. Without the leave of the council of Plymouth, not a ship might sail into a harbor from Newfoundland to the latitude of Philadelphia; not a skin might be purchased in the interior; not a fish might be caught on the coast; not an emigrant might tread the soil. No regard was shown for the liberties of those who might become inhabitants of Chap VIII.} 1620 the colony; they were to be ruled, without their own consent, by the corporation in England. The patent favored only the cupidity of the proprietors, and possessed all the worst features of a commercial monopoly A royal proclamation w
Clarendon, Ark. (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
eption and cunning had been worthy of a king. But he was an awkward liar, rather than a crafty dissembler. Hallam's England, i. 404. He could, before parliament, call God to witness his sincerity, when he was already resolved on being insincere. His cowardice was such, that he feigned a fondness for Carr, whose arrest for murder he had secretly ordered. He was afraid of his wife; could be governed by being overawed; and was easily intimidated by the vulgar insolence of Buckingham. Clarendon's Rebellion, i. 16. Hume, c. XLIX. i. In Scotland, he solemnly declared his attachment Calderwood's Church of Scotland 286. to the Puritan discipline and doctrines; but it was from his fear of open resistance. The pusillanimous man assents from cowardice, and recovers boldness with the assurance of impunity. Demonology was a favorite topic with King James. He demonstrated with erudition the reality of witchcraft; through his solicitation it was made, by statute, a capital offence
Connecticut (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
185. Hazard, i. 390. and a transient regard for the rights of the country, could delay, but not defeat, a measure that was sustained by the personal favorites of the monarch. After two years entreaty, the ambitious adventurers gained 1620 Nov. 3. every thing which they had solicited; and King James issued to forty of his subjects, some of them members of his household and his government, the most wealthy Chap. VIII.} 1620. and powerful of the English nobility, a patent, Trumbull's Connecticut, i. 546—567. Hazard, i. 103—118. Baylies, i. 160—185. Compare Hubbard, c. XXX.; Chalmers, 81—85. which 1620. in American annals, and even in the history of the world, has but one parallel. The adventurers and their successors were incorporated as The Council established at Plymouth, in the county of Devon, for the planting, ruling, ordering and governing New England, in America. The territory conferred on the patentees in absolute property, with unlimited jurisdiction, the sole pow
France (France) (search for this): chapter 12
ly-discovered continent, within the short space of two centuries, have infused themselves into the life-blood of every rising state from Labrador to Chili, have erected outposts on the Oregon and in Liberia, and, making a proselyte of enlightened France. have disturbed all the ancient governments of Europe, by awakening the public mind to resistless action, from the shores of Portugal to the palaces of the czars. The trading company of the west of England, in- 1606 corporated in the same pay thousand of those who frequented conventicles. D'Ewes's Jour. 517. Strype's Whitgift, 417. Neal's Puritans, i. 516. It was proposed to banish them, as the Moors had been banished from Spain, and as the Huguenots were afterwards driven from France. This measure was not adopted; but a law of savage ferocity, ordering those, who, for a month, should be absent from the English service, to be interrogated as to their belief, menaced the obstinate non-conformists with exile or with death. 3
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