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Moab (Michigan, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
on the Connecticut; but, under a new summons, they made the long march through the pathless region to Albany. Among them was John Stark, then a lieutenant, of a rugged nature, but of the coolest judgment; skilled at discovering the paths of the wilderness, and knowing the way to the hearts of the backwoodsmen. The French, on the other hand, called every able-bodied man in the district of Montreal into active service for the defence of Crown Point, so that reapers had to be sent up from Three Rivers and Quebec to gather in the harvest. Breard to the Minister, 13 August, 1755. Early in August, the New England men, having Phinehas Lyman for their major-general, were finishing Fort Edward, at the portage between the Hudson chap. IX.} 1755. and the headsprings of the Sorel. The forests were never free from secret danger; American scalps were sought for by the wakeful savage, to be strung together for the adornment of the wigwam. Towards the end of August, the untrained forces,
Hartford (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
head of South Bay, and were travelling from Wood Creek to the Hudson. On the next morning, after a council of war, Ephraim Williams, a Massachusetts colonel, the same who, in passing through Albany, had made a bequest of his estate by will to found a free school, was sent with a thousand men to relieve Fort Edward. Among chap. IX.} 1755. them was Israel Putnam, to whom, at the age of thirty-seven, the Assembly at Connecticut had just given the rank of a second lieutenant. Records at Hartford for 29 Geo. II. Putnam's commission as 2nd Lieut. in the 6th company of the 3rd Regiment of Connecticut, forwarded not before September 2, reached him after the battle. Two hundred warriors of the Six Nations went also, led by Hendrick, the gray-haired chieftain, famed for his clear voice and flashing eye. They marched with rash confidence, a little less than three miles, to a defile, where the French and Indians had posted themselves on both sides of the way, concealed on the left by the
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 9
Chapter 9: Great Britain unites America under military rule Newcastle's administration continued. 1755-1756. while the British interpretation of the bounda- chap. IX.} 1755. ries of Acasuch an independency without a strong naval force, which it must for ever be in the power of Great Britain to hinder them from having. And whilst his majesty hath seven thousand troops kept up withiown school of Worcester, after a career of danger and effort, shall stand before the king of Great Britain, the acknowledged Envoy of the free and United States of America. The military operationsSee the Pamphlet written jointly by Win. Knox and George Grenville. The Controversy between Great Britain and her Colonies Reviewed, pp. 196, 197. Shirley was a civilian, versed in English law, and ing altercations with colonial assemblies, gave a military character to the interference of Great Britain in American affairs. To New York Lords of Trade to Sir Charles Hardy. chap. IX.} 1756.
Brest (France) (search for this): chapter 9
ewcastle, the prime minister, think some middle way may be found out. He was asked what way. To be sure, he replied, Hawke must go out; but he may be ordered not to attack the enemy, unless he thinks chap IX.} 1755. it worth while. He was answered, that Hawke was too wise to do any thing at all, which others, when done, were to pronounce he ought to be hanged for. What, replied the Duke, if he had orders not to fall upon the French, unless they were more in number together than ten? The Brest squadron, it was replied, is but nine. I mean that, resumed Newcastle, of the merchantmen only. Thus he proceeded with inconceivable absurdity. Dodington's Diary. Walpole's Memoires of George III. and letters. Waldegrave's Memoirs. Flassan: Histoire de la Diplomatie Francoise, VI. France and England were still at peace; and their commerce was mutually protected by the sanctity of treaties. Of a sudden, hostile orders were issued to all British vessels of war to take all French vesse
Kingston (Canada) (search for this): chapter 9
obtain the use of the Russian troops against Frederic, it negotiated an alliance with Frederic himself, not to permit the entrance of Russian or any other foreign troops into Germany. At the head of the American forces this ministry had placed Shirley, a worn-out barrister, who knew nothing of war. In the security of a congress of governors at New York, he in December planned a splendid campaign for the following year. Quebec was to be menaced by way of the Kennebec and the Chaudiere; Frontenac and Toronto and Niagara were to be taken; and then Fort. Duquesne and Detroit and Michilimackinac, deprived of their communications, were of course to surrender. Sharpe, of Maryland, thought all efforts vain, unless parliament should interfere; and this opinion he enforced in many letters to his correspondents. See the Correspondence of Sharpe with his brother in England, and his colleagues in America. His colleagues and the officers of the army were equally importunate. If 1756 the
Montreal (Canada) (search for this): chapter 9
and Massachusetts. A regiment of five hundred foresters of New Hampshire were raising a fort in Coos, on the Connecticut; but, under a new summons, they made the long march through the pathless region to Albany. Among them was John Stark, then a lieutenant, of a rugged nature, but of the coolest judgment; skilled at discovering the paths of the wilderness, and knowing the way to the hearts of the backwoodsmen. The French, on the other hand, called every able-bodied man in the district of Montreal into active service for the defence of Crown Point, so that reapers had to be sent up from Three Rivers and Quebec to gather in the harvest. Breard to the Minister, 13 August, 1755. Early in August, the New England men, having Phinehas Lyman for their major-general, were finishing Fort Edward, at the portage between the Hudson chap. IX.} 1755. and the headsprings of the Sorel. The forests were never free from secret danger; American scalps were sought for by the wakeful savage, to
New Castle, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
Chapter 9: Great Britain unites America under military rule Newcastle's administration continued. 1755-1756. while the British interpretation of the bounda- chap. IX.} 1755. ries of Acadia was made good by occupation, the troops for the central expeditions had assembled at Albany. The army with which Johnson was to reduce Crown Point consisted of New England militia, chiefly from Connecticut and Massachusetts. A regiment of five hundred foresters of New Hampshire were raising a fort in Coos, on the Connecticut; but, under a new summons, they made the long march through the pathless region to Albany. Among them was John Stark, then a lieutenant, of a rugged nature, but of the coolest judgment; skilled at discovering the paths of the wilderness, and knowing the way to the hearts of the backwoodsmen. The French, on the other hand, called every able-bodied man in the district of Montreal into active service for the defence of Crown Point, so that reapers had to be sent u
France (France) (search for this): chapter 9
's people went up, that they might be crowned with victory to the glory of God; for the war with France seemed a war for Protestantism and freedom. But Johnson knew not how to profit by success; wirge III. and letters. Waldegrave's Memoirs. Flassan: Histoire de la Diplomatie Francoise, VI. France and England were still at peace; and their commerce was mutually protected by the sanctity of trs about seven hundred thousand pounds. Eight thousand French seamen were held in captivity. All France resented the perfidy. Never, said Louis the Fifteenth, will I forgive the piracies of this insond, in a letter to George the Second, he demanded ample reparation for the insult to the flag of France by Boscawen, and for the piracies of the English men-of-war, committed in defiance of internatio reciprocal duties of kings. Louis XV. to Geo. II., 21 October, 1755. The wound inflicted on France by this robbery of private property on the high seas before a declaration of war, rankled inward
Canada (Canada) (search for this): chapter 9
egulars, sixteen hundred Canadians, and seven hundred savages had assembled. Of these, three hundred or more were emigrants from the Six Nations, domiciliated in Canada. Eager for distinction, Dieskau, taking with him six hundred savages, as many Canadians, and two hundred regular troops, ascended Lake Champlain to its head, and the American career of the fearless Dieskau. In June his eye had first rested on the cliff of Quebec; he had sailed proudly up the stream which was the glory of Canada; had made his way to the highland sources of the Sorel; and now, mangled and helpless, lay a prisoner within the limits of the pretended French dominion. Dieskns, and their fluctuating tenure of office made it difficult to mature novel or daring measures of legislation. There existed no central will, that could conquer Canada, or subvert the liberties of America. A majority of the Treasury Board, as well as the Board of Trade, favored American taxation by act of parliament; none scr
Marseilles (France) (search for this): chapter 9
inconceivable absurdity. Dodington's Diary. Walpole's Memoires of George III. and letters. Waldegrave's Memoirs. Flassan: Histoire de la Diplomatie Francoise, VI. France and England were still at peace; and their commerce was mutually protected by the sanctity of treaties. Of a sudden, hostile orders were issued to all British vessels of war to take all French vessels, private as well as public; and, without warning, ships from the French colonies, the ships bound from Martinico to Marseilles, freighted with the rich products of plantations tilled by the slaves of the Jesuits, De Tocqueville: Histoire Philosophique du regne de Louis XV. II. 287. the fishing-smacks in which the humble Breton mariners ventured to Newfoundland, whale-ships returning from their adventures, the scanty fortunes with which poor men freighted the little barks engaged in the coasting trade, were within one month, by violence and by cowardly artifices, seized by the British marine, and carried into En
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