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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 174 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 166 0 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 164 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 154 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 128 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 126 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 126 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 118 0 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 116 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 110 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition.. You can also browse the collection for France (France) or search for France (France) in all documents.

Your search returned 40 results in 11 document sections:

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e Quebec act went into effect; and on the twenty-ninth, the American congress, by the hand of Jay, addressed the Canadians: We most sincerely condole with you on the arrival of that day, in the course of which the sun could not shine on a single freeman in all your extensive dominions. By the introduction of your present form of government, or rather present form of tyranny, you and your wives and your children are made slaves. Appeals were also directed to their pride, their affection for France, their courage, and their regard for the common welfare; but no adequate mo- Chap. XXXVI.} 1775. May. tive for rising was set before them. As the congress intended still to petition the king, they could only request some vague co-operation in imploring the attention of their sovereign; a request which at most was only fitted to secure neutrality. The Canadians, as Frenchmen, feared not taxation by parliament, but the haughty dominion of their conquerors; as Catholics they dreaded the ex
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