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Lamar (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
d a few years ago in the dredging and park improvements. In May, 1855, the Living Age, then in other ownership, sailed from New York with a cargo of general merchandise for the Sandwich Islands. It was mid-winter in the Southern hemisphere, when for thirty days, with scant food and scurvy-smitten sailors, she was beating around Cape Horn. One hundred and fifty-three long, hard days elapsed ere anchor was cast at Honolulu, where her cargo was discharged. Thence she sailed in ballast for Shanghai, where she took on a cargo of tea and silk valued at $200,000. On December 25 she started on the homeward stretch of the voyage round the world, one destined not to be completed, but to end in disaster. The Living Age was then under command of Captain Holmes, and in all twenty-three persons were on board. They were captain and wife, three mates, and eighteen men and boys before the mast. This crew were American, English, a few Swedes, and one Italian, and are described as an excellent
Fort Vancouver (Washington, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
We have had an interesting interview with Captain Hinckley, who though well nigh a nonagenarian, is still actively engaged in the insurance business in Boston, and who followed the seas for several years after the loss of the Living Age. His voyages were to St. John, N. B.; London; Antwerp; Gibraltar; Malaga; and to Batavia, Java, the latter with a cargo of ice for Frederick Tudor. It is somewhat remarkable that these were also made in four Medford-built vessels, the Cygnet, Horsburgh, Vancouver, and /osiah Quincy. The N. B. Palmer, in which he returned after the wreck of the Living Age was not here built. Captain Hinckley modestly disclaims the title, and says it was hard to say no to the offer of the ship owners of a captain's position, pay and privilege, having served thus temporarily in those his youthful days. But the title has clung and effort to shake it off has been unavailing. He tells us that the owners of the Living Age lost two other ships in that same fateful
China Sea (search for this): chapter 1
e northeast monsoon was a favoring wind, but the weather conditions and dense fog gave no opportunity for taking observations. Only the heaving of the log at two-hour intervals gave any indication of speed, and the reckoning was necessarily inaccurate. Well realizing the danger, the captain picked his way carefully along, and for a time successfully. After four days second mate Hinckley was on deck in the early morning watch, and at four o'clock found they were still in the treacherous China Sea and near Pratas Shoal, which has been the graveyard of many a noble ship besides the Living Age. Here is the story he tells:-- Day by day the Living Age nosed her way through the dangerous shoals of the China Sea. At four in the morning of the fifth day out Captain Hinckley, who was the watch on deck, realized that the ship was near Pratas Shoal. The course was changed to avoid it, but owing to the unreliability of the log line reckonings the ship did not pass the shoal as Captain Hin
Java (Indonesia) (search for this): chapter 1
all stood without effects on a friendly deck. Thence they proceeded to Hong Kong. For the rescue Captain Munroe received from President Fillmore a gold chronometer. We have had an interesting interview with Captain Hinckley, who though well nigh a nonagenarian, is still actively engaged in the insurance business in Boston, and who followed the seas for several years after the loss of the Living Age. His voyages were to St. John, N. B.; London; Antwerp; Gibraltar; Malaga; and to Batavia, Java, the latter with a cargo of ice for Frederick Tudor. It is somewhat remarkable that these were also made in four Medford-built vessels, the Cygnet, Horsburgh, Vancouver, and /osiah Quincy. The N. B. Palmer, in which he returned after the wreck of the Living Age was not here built. Captain Hinckley modestly disclaims the title, and says it was hard to say no to the offer of the ship owners of a captain's position, pay and privilege, having served thus temporarily in those his youthful day
Manila (Philippines) (search for this): chapter 1
ive hundred Chinese coolies on board whom she was carrying to California would in terror at her leaking condition seize the ship if he sent part of his crew away to rescue the shipwrecked party, the ship's captain had decided to make all sail for Manila for repairs and report the discovery of the crew of the Living Age. On the thirty-fifth day after the wreck, a Chinese sampan was sighted by the part of the ship's company which had remained on the Living Age and in it were Mr. Campbell and hiomed up, and she shortly after came to anchor near the shore, lowering her largest boat, the officer of which on hearing my story directed our boat to go aboard, while he went ashore for the remainder. The steamer was the Shanghai (English) from Manila, Captain Munroe, and in a short time we all stood without effects on a friendly deck. Thence they proceeded to Hong Kong. For the rescue Captain Munroe received from President Fillmore a gold chronometer. We have had an interesting interview
Baptistea (search for this): chapter 1
ars, and we all took turns at winding it until its last mutilated and fragmentary tune had died away. In vain we tinkered with it. Its last note had fled, and we gave it a sailor's burial. It was about the twentieth day on the wreck, that Mr. Baptistea, the French cook, gave notice. It had occurred to Mr. Baptistea that, by the laws of the sea, since he was wrecked and had received no wages he could not work. The officers said that if he would not cook for them they would build no raft fMr. Baptistea that, by the laws of the sea, since he was wrecked and had received no wages he could not work. The officers said that if he would not cook for them they would build no raft for him, whereupon he set about building a raft of his own. He soon decided, however, that he would resume the cooking. A roughly constructed flat-bottomed boat was built, and Mr. Campbell, the chief officer, took a few men and started when the sea was smooth to inspect an island lying about ten miles distant. After nearly being driven out to sea by the changing wind the boat's crew succeeded in landing on the island, erected a pole bearing a distress signal, and stationed a lookout near it.
Elizabeth Brooks (search for this): chapter 1
,and appended a register of vessels built in Medford, which then numbered 359. Mr. Baker is certainly to be commended for his interest in Medford history and for his contribution to Medford annals. By the publication of the History of Medford, Mr. Brooks preserved this register and completed it to date, a total enumeration of 513. Thirty years later Mr. Usher alluded to the same and said it is too extensive for admission here, but gave an abstract of the same, which shows the number built in each of the seven decades, 1803 to 1873, and totals 567, 483 in the first five, and 84 in the last two, decades. Thirty of these last were named in detail by Mr. Brooks. All Mr. Usher said relative to the other is, The last ship built in this town was launched from the ship yard of Mr. Joshua T. Foster in 1873. He did not even give the name. Thus it appears (except in the above) there were 54 ships built in Medford, of which there is no record of name, owner, builder, style or tonnage,
Jotham Stetson (search for this): chapter 1
town, as well as by the purchasers. Referring to this register we find the first in enumeration of 1848, and 399th in order- Ship, Living Age; ship yard, J. Stetson's; builder, J. Stetson; owner, E. D. Peters & Co., Boston; tonnage, 758. Jotham Stetson's ship yard was just below the location of Winthrop bridge, and the lJ. Stetson; owner, E. D. Peters & Co., Boston; tonnage, 758. Jotham Stetson's ship yard was just below the location of Winthrop bridge, and the last remains of wharf and piling were removed a few years ago in the dredging and park improvements. In May, 1855, the Living Age, then in other ownership, sailed from New York with a cargo of general merchandise for the Sandwich Islands. It was mid-winter in the Southern hemisphere, when for thirty days, with scant food and scJotham Stetson's ship yard was just below the location of Winthrop bridge, and the last remains of wharf and piling were removed a few years ago in the dredging and park improvements. In May, 1855, the Living Age, then in other ownership, sailed from New York with a cargo of general merchandise for the Sandwich Islands. It was mid-winter in the Southern hemisphere, when for thirty days, with scant food and scurvy-smitten sailors, she was beating around Cape Horn. One hundred and fifty-three long, hard days elapsed ere anchor was cast at Honolulu, where her cargo was discharged. Thence she sailed in ballast for Shanghai, where she took on a cargo of tea and silk valued at $200,000. On December 25 she started on the homeward stretch of
Louis Kossuth (search for this): chapter 1
at and vest. Have you a ditty box? she asked Captain Hinckley. Yes, said he, and handed her his own box from a shelf above his head. Mrs. Holmes, as calmly as if she had been in her own sittingroom, selected from the box needles and thread, which she carefully tucked away in the pockets of her coat. All the while the ship was lurching fearfully and pounding against the coral reef. You don't happen to have an extra hat? asked Mrs. Holmes. Captain Hinckley handed her a Louis Kossuth hat, which had become famous after Kossuth's visit to this country. Taking a pair of scissors, she coolly and quickly cut off her hair close to her head, tried on the hat, and secured it under her chin with a tape fastened with safety pins. There, don't I look like a boy? she asked jokingly, and went calmly on deck in the midst of the uproar and confusion. Mrs. Holmes' manner was never other than brave throughout the fearful days that followed. Where men who had followed the s
a, Captain Munroe, and in a short time we all stood without effects on a friendly deck. Thence they proceeded to Hong Kong. For the rescue Captain Munroe received from President Fillmore a gold chronometer. We have had an interesting interview with Captain Hinckley, who though well nigh a nonagenarian, is still actively engaged in the insurance business in Boston, and who followed the seas for several years after the loss of the Living Age. His voyages were to St. John, N. B.; London; Antwerp; Gibraltar; Malaga; and to Batavia, Java, the latter with a cargo of ice for Frederick Tudor. It is somewhat remarkable that these were also made in four Medford-built vessels, the Cygnet, Horsburgh, Vancouver, and /osiah Quincy. The N. B. Palmer, in which he returned after the wreck of the Living Age was not here built. Captain Hinckley modestly disclaims the title, and says it was hard to say no to the offer of the ship owners of a captain's position, pay and privilege, having served
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