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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: January 21, 1861., [Electronic resource].

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tion as against foreign foes. We have reason to know that he perceives and feels clearly that this is the predominant question of the time, towering above every other. Indeed, of what avail is any compromise or any arrangement whatever until it be first established that the Union of the States and the Federal Government are something real and living, and not a precarious sham, built of nothing more substantial than parchment and red tape, and existing at the mercy of speaking traitors like Floyd, or noisy ones like Toombs. No compromises, then! No delusive and deluding concessions! No surrender of principle! No cowardly reversal of the Great Verdict of the sixth of November! Let us have the question of questions settled now and for all time! There can never be another opportunity so good as the present. Let us know once for all whether the slave power is really stronger than the Union. Let us have it decided whether the Mexican system of rebellion can be successfully intr
uis, January 18.--In the House yesterday Mr. Stevenson's substitute for the Convention bill, asking Congress to call a National Convention, was lost--104 to 12. Mr. Lacey's amendment for the original bill submitting the action of the Convention to the people was then adopted, and the bill passed.--105 to 17,--all the Republican delegation from St. Louis, except one, voting in the negative. Message of the Governor of Kentucky. In his message to the Legislature of Kentucky, Governor Magoffin asks an expression of Legislative approbation of Crittenden's resolution, says that eight States will have seceded before their deliberations close, and that Tennessee has referred the whole subject to her people. Virginia and North Carolina are discussing the propriety of a similar course. Missouri seems likely to adopt a similar policy. It submits to the Legislature the propriety to provide for the election of delegates to a Convention, to assemble at an early day, to determine th
January 18th (search for this): article 1
A petition praying for the adoption of the Crittenden propositions by Congress, bearing nearly 6,000 names, has been forwarded to Washington. St, Louis, January 18.--In the House yesterday Mr. Stevenson's substitute for the Convention bill, asking Congress to call a National Convention, was lost--104 to 12. Mr. Lacey'srce in any form against the seceding States, and asks appropriations for arming and equipping a volunteer militia. Important from Louisiana. New Orleans, Jan. 18.--The programme for Louisiana's secession is already agreed upon by the leading members of the Convention.--Arrangements are being perfected among the seced of fugitives from service." It was framed and has the effect to nullify the fugitive slave law of Congress. The Border States proposition. New York, Jan. 18.--A meeting of prominent merchants was held here this afternoon, when a memorial to Congress was adopted recommending the adoption of the compromise plan proposed
Stevenson (search for this): article 1
people after which the whole subject was tabled and a substitute embracing an entirely new proposition asking Congress to call a Convention for the redress of grievances as provided in the fifth article of the Constitution, was introduced by Mr. Stevenson. A petition praying for the adoption of the Crittenden propositions by Congress, bearing nearly 6,000 names, has been forwarded to Washington. St, Louis, January 18.--In the House yesterday Mr. Stevenson's substitute for the ConventMr. Stevenson's substitute for the Convention bill, asking Congress to call a National Convention, was lost--104 to 12. Mr. Lacey's amendment for the original bill submitting the action of the Convention to the people was then adopted, and the bill passed.--105 to 17,--all the Republican delegation from St. Louis, except one, voting in the negative. Message of the Governor of Kentucky. In his message to the Legislature of Kentucky, Governor Magoffin asks an expression of Legislative approbation of Crittenden's resolution,
February 20th (search for this): article 1
e to declare by a resolution the unconditional disapprobation by Kentucky of the employment of force in any form against the seceding States, and asks appropriations for arming and equipping a volunteer militia. Important from Louisiana. New Orleans, Jan. 18.--The programme for Louisiana's secession is already agreed upon by the leading members of the Convention.--Arrangements are being perfected among the seceding States for holding a general Convention at Montgomery, on the 20th February, to devise the plan of the new Confederacy, to adopt the Federal Constitution, claim title, and ask recognition by the European Powers and the United States. The President's message is strongly animadverted on as his weakest production, deploring the condition of the country without assuming any position. Forts Jackson and St. Philip are to be largely reinforced for the defence of the months of the Mississippi. It is contemplated to fit out privateers should coercion be attem
James Buchanan (search for this): article 1
esday: To his Excellency Gov. Morgan: Sir: I have had the honor to receive your communication, covering the resolutions which passed the Legislature of New York on the 11th instant, tendering aid to the President of the United States, in support of the Constitution and the Union, and shall give them that respectful consideration to which they are entitled from the importance of the subject and the distinguished source from which they have emanated. Your, very respectfully, James Buchanan. Opposed to coercion. The New York World contains a letter from Hon. Henry W. Hilliard, of Alabama, from which the following is an extract: "Now that some of the States have dissolved their connection with the Union, force is not to be employed against them. The whole theory of our government is opposed to it. Force may be employed against masses of individuals, however numerous; never against political communities or States." "The Southern people are unconquerable.-
Edmund Ruffin (search for this): article 1
all round the white man and then turn round and grin at what he had done. Among the passengers in our cabin was Edmund Ruffin, of Virginia. This gentleman has been in the South since the commencement of the secession movement. I noticed his ons of the harbor on this occasion. As a companion and pleasant talker, I have met with few men I like better than Mr. Ruffin. He is full of information and ready to impart it. He is withal quite a secessionist, and as a matter of course readilughing and jesting, work becomes play, and men who never before lifted a spade worked on without complaint. Here comes Mr. Ruffin, says one. All the party for the moment ceased labor and the venerable old gentleman smilingly approached with his heat the United States, and for several minutes, I assure you, he made good use of the opportunity.--All were anxious that Mr. Ruffin should fill one barrow for them at least, so that by the time he had performed the requests of all I have no doubt was
John J. Crittenden (search for this): article 1
tute for the Convention bill, asking Congress to call a National Convention, was lost--104 to 12. Mr. Lacey's amendment for the original bill submitting the action of the Convention to the people was then adopted, and the bill passed.--105 to 17,--all the Republican delegation from St. Louis, except one, voting in the negative. Message of the Governor of Kentucky. In his message to the Legislature of Kentucky, Governor Magoffin asks an expression of Legislative approbation of Crittenden's resolution, says that eight States will have seceded before their deliberations close, and that Tennessee has referred the whole subject to her people. Virginia and North Carolina are discussing the propriety of a similar course. Missouri seems likely to adopt a similar policy. It submits to the Legislature the propriety to provide for the election of delegates to a Convention, to assemble at an early day, to determine the future inter. State and Federal relations of Kentucky. Meanw
rk troops. The recent tender of the services of the First Division of New York State troops by Maj. Gen. Sanford to Gov. Morgan, seems to have created considerable dissatisfaction among the rank and file of the Division. The Herald contains a cour morning's issue that Major General Sanford has, with the concurrence of the Division Board of Officers, tendered to Gov. Morgan the services of the entire First Division, for any duty the present emergency may require. Now I would like to know bbject: The city military are all in a ferment, owing to Major General Sanford's tender of the First Division to Governor Morgan, in case an emergency should arise out of the crisis in our national affairs rendering their services desirable. Th. The following communication to the New York Legislature was read in the Assembly on Wednesday: To his Excellency Gov. Morgan: Sir: I have had the honor to receive your communication, covering the resolutions which passed the Legisla
he services of the First Division of New York State troops by Maj. Gen. Sanford to Gov. Morgan, seems to have created considerable dissatisfalowing is a sample: I see by your morning's issue that Major General Sanford has, with the concurrence of the Division Board of Officerscy may require. Now I would like to know by what authority Major General Sanford, or the Division Board of Officers, has to offer the servicwould like to ask if it would not be imprudent on the part of Major Gen. Sanford, under the present excited state of public feeling existing ithe military out of New York? It seems to me the action of Major General Sanford confirms what I have often seen in some of the New York papind the following from a member of the gallant "Seventh:" General Sanford has offered the services of the First Division of the N. Y. S.ject: The city military are all in a ferment, owing to Major General Sanford's tender of the First Division to Governor Morgan, in case
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