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Robert Anderson (search for this): article 1
he hauled down the private signal of the vessel to let Major Anderson know that she was leaving. Had Major Anderson preMajor Anderson prevented the steamer with the schooner (supposed to be armed) from passing under the guns of his fort, or had he attempted to s that he had had a painful interview with the wife of Major Anderson, who had come on from New York to see him. She had manresponsibility resting upon him to protect the lives of Maj. Anderson and his command. We told him that the news that reinfoCharleston, would be the surest means of provoking what Mrs. Anderson apprehended, and what he so much deprecated. We said, further, that we did not believe that Major Anderson was in danger of such an attack; that the general sentiment of the Statapplied to the forts; mentioned the difference between Major Anderson's occupying his then position at Fort Moultrie, and th Lieut. Theodore Talbot, who was commissioned by Major Robert Anderson, of Fort Sumter, with dispatches for instructions f
rt is a first class bastioned fort, built of New York granite, and situated on low ground on the east point of Santa Rosa Island. Its walls are forty-five feet in height by twelve feet in thickness; it is embrasure for two tiers of guns, which are placed under bombproof casemates, besides having one tier of guns en barbette. The guns from this work radiate to every point of the horizon, with flank and enfilading fire at every angle of approach. The work was commenced in 1828 and finished in 1853. It cost the Federal Government nearly one million of dollars. When on a war footing its garrison consists of 1,260 soldiers. Its armament, only a portion of which is within its walls, consists of-- Guns. Forty-two pounder iron guns63 Thirty-two-pounder iron guns17 Twenty-four-pounder iron guns49 Eighteen pounder iron guns5 Twelve pounder iron guns13 Brass field pieces6 Brass flank howitzers26 Heavy eight inch howitzers13 Thirteen-inch mortar1 Heavy ten-inch mortars4 L
The National crisis. the Star of the West arrived at New York — Seward's speech statement of the South Carolina Commissioners — Description of the forts that have been taken possession of--New York Legislature resolutions Message of the Governor of Indiana. &c. &c The return of the Star of the West to New York — Narr Pierce, from Liverpool, of and for Charleston, at anchor. She had been refused admittance in consequence of having the American flag flying. Speech of Senator Seward. Senator Seward made his long looked for speech in the Senate Saturday. The conclusion of it contains the gist of his argument — certainly his declaratioSenator Seward made his long looked for speech in the Senate Saturday. The conclusion of it contains the gist of his argument — certainly his declarations. He says: So far as the abstract question whether, by the Constitution of the United States, the bondsman, who is made such by the laws of a State, is still a man or only property, 1 answer that, within that State, its laws on that subject are supreme; that when he has escaped from that State into another, the Constit
it was now strong ebb tide, and the water having fallen some three feet, we proceeded with caution, and crossed the bar safely at $50 A. M, and continued on our course for this port, where we arrived this morning, after a boisterous passage. A steamer from Charleston was about three hours watching our movements. In justice to the officers and crew of each department of the ship, I must add, that their behavior, white under the fire of the battery, reflected great credit on them Mr. Brewer, the New York pilot, was of very great assistance to me in helping to pilot the ship over Charleston bar, and up and down the channel. Very respectfully, your ob't. serv't. J. McGowan, Captain. We learn from other sources that the firing was maintained from the Island about fifteen minutes, and that the guns sent good line shots, although most of them were much too high and went over the vessel. After two or three shots had been fired, the troops on board exhibited more curi
ctions, and until they are received, the Star of the West will remain where she now is with the troops on board, and no communication will be permitted except to Government officers, between her and the shore. The troops, two hundred in number, are in excellent health and spirits. Statement of Capt. McGowan. The following is an official account of the trip: Steam ship Star of the West. New York, Jan. 12th, 1861. M. O. Roberts, Esq--Sir: After leaving the wharf on the 5th inst., at 5 P. M., we proceeded down the bay, where we have to and took on board four officers and two hundred soldiers, with their arms, ammunition, &c, and then proceeded to sea, crossing the bar at Sandy Hook at 9 P. M.--Nothing unusual took place during the passage, which was a pleasant one for the season of the year. We arrived off Charleston bar at 1.30 A. M. on the 9th inst. but could find no guiding marks for the bar, as the lights were all out. We proceeded with caution, running ve
James Buchanan (search for this): article 1
then existing condition of things in Charleston harbor would, in the excited state of feeling at home, inevitably precipitate a collision. The impression made upon us was, that the President was wavering, and had not decided what course he would pursue. He said he was glad to have had this conversation with us, but would prefer that we should give him a written memorandum of the substance of what we had said. This we did on Monday, the 10th. It was in these words: To His Excellency James Buchanan,President of the United States: In compliance with our statement to you yesterday. we now express to you our strong convictions that neither the constituted authorities, nor any body of the people of South Carolina, will either attack or molest the United States forts in the harbor of Charleston, previously to the action of the Convention, and we hope and believe not until an offer has been made through an accredited representative, to negotiate for an amicable arrangement of
Lawrence M. Keitt (search for this): article 1
the United States forts in the harbor of Charleston, previously to the action of the Convention, and we hope and believe not until an offer has been made through an accredited representative, to negotiate for an amicable arrangement of all matters between the State and the Federal Government, provided that no reinforcements shall be sent into those forts, and their relative military status shall remain as at present. John McQueen, Wm. Porcher Miles, M. L. Bonman, W. W. Boyce. Lawrence M. Keitt. Washington, 9th December, 1860. The President did not like the word "provided," because it looked as if we were binding him while avowing that we had no authority to commit the Convention. We told him we did not so understand it. We were expressing our convictions and belief, predicated upon the maintenance of a certain condition of things, which maintenance was absolutely and entirely in his power. If he maintained such condition, then we believed that collision would
William Gilham (search for this): article 1
every occasion of outbreak or collision. Lieutenant Talbot. Lieut. Theodore Talbot, who was commissioned by Major Robert Anderson, of Fort Sumter, with dispatches for instructions from the General Government, passed through this city yesterday morning on route for Washington. He was in undress uniform, wore a foraging cap with glazed cover, and having on a citizen's overcoat, did not appear very much like a soldier. He is a man of small stature, resembling, in point of size, Maj. Wm. Gilham, of the Virginia Military Institute. His complexion and hair, however, are light, and light whiskers, a la militaire, adorn his cheeks. He appeared to be about thirty-five years of age, and walked erect and firmly, in true military style. He seemed to be pretty well finished with South Carolina bank notes, which he displayed in the office of the Richmond and Petersburg Railroad Company when hunting up some Virginia funds, with which to pay for his ticket. Lieut. Talbot is a native o
h he displayed in the office of the Richmond and Petersburg Railroad Company when hunting up some Virginia funds, with which to pay for his ticket. Lieut. Talbot is a native of the District of Columbia, but was appointed from Kentucky, in May, 1847, to the post of Second Lieutenant First Regiment U. S. Artillery.--He is a graduate of the Kentucky Military Institute. The date of his commission as a First Lieutenant of the Regiment, is September 22d, 1848; his rank in the Army is that of Brevet Captain.--Petersburg (Va) Express. Message of the Governor of Indiana. Indianapolis, Ind., Jan. 11.--Gov. Hammond's message relates mainly to the state of affairs. He says, the law for the protection of the ballot box against fraud is defective. He recommends the passage of a law inflicting heavy penalties for illegal voting. He recommends the establishment of a sub-treasury system, to prevent loss from the depreciated condition of the securities upon which our Bank circulation is ba
th which to pay for his ticket. Lieut. Talbot is a native of the District of Columbia, but was appointed from Kentucky, in May, 1847, to the post of Second Lieutenant First Regiment U. S. Artillery.--He is a graduate of the Kentucky Military Institute. The date of his commission as a First Lieutenant of the Regiment, is September 22d, 1848; his rank in the Army is that of Brevet Captain.--Petersburg (Va) Express. Message of the Governor of Indiana. Indianapolis, Ind., Jan. 11.--Gov. Hammond's message relates mainly to the state of affairs. He says, the law for the protection of the ballot box against fraud is defective. He recommends the passage of a law inflicting heavy penalties for illegal voting. He recommends the establishment of a sub-treasury system, to prevent loss from the depreciated condition of the securities upon which our Bank circulation is based. He says the strength of the Federal Government rests in the affection of the people of the several States,
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