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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: November 4, 1861., [Electronic resource].

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Springfield, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 1
Clellan ever gave utterance to any such opinion; but we have no doubt that in his heart he entertains it. And not only be, but all the Black Republican party. Whatever may have been the original conviction of that party, they must already have seen enough to shake it to the very foundation. Everywhere, since the commencement of the war — along the whole line of the frontier — the armies of the North, with only two exceptions, have suffered defeat. At Bethel at Bull Run, at Manassas, at Springfield at Lexington, at New Orleans, at Cross-Lanes, at Carnifax Ferry, at Greenbrier, they have been signally overthrown. At Laurel Hill, with a force of ten thousand men, they succeeded after a desperate struggle, in overwhelming two hundred and forty-three brave soldiers. And at Hatteras inlet, they succeeded in capturing a small fort with an enormous fleet, carrying several hundred guns, and men, enough to take a place five times as powerful. Whatever Lincoln and his Cabinet may have thou
Jefferson Thompson (search for this): article 1
ps for a fight — the late engagement of Gen. Jeff. Thompson--the collision of forces at Greenville,ri we gather from our Southern exchanges: Thompson — particulars of recent Engagements, &c. the very centre. The courier from Gen. Jeff. Thompson reports an engagement near Iron Mountaiabout eighteen hundred Confederates, under Jeff. Thompson. and between four and five thousand Federhe fire. The period of this trepidation gave Thompson's men opportunity to reload, and another voll confederates and the exposed Federals, until Thompson's ordnance stores gave out, and the battery wtill in our hands. Movements of Gen, Jeff. Thompson. The following particulars of the movements of Gen. Jeff. Thompson we find in the Memphis Appeal of the 2th October. Our readers will fin: We have seen a private letter from Gen'l Thompson, to a gentleman in this city, dated the 23were moved to a new field of labor, under General Thompson's personal command. Of course, any state[4 more...]<
From Kentucky and Missouri Eagerness of McCulloch's troops for a fight — the late engagement of Gen. Jeff. Thompson--the collision of forces at Greenville, &, &c. The following intelligence from the contending forces in Kentucky and Missouri we gather from our Southern exchanges: Thompson — particulars of recent Engagements, &c. An interesting letter appears in the Memphis Appeal, of the 29th ult., dated "Columbus, Ky., Oct. 26," from which we extract the following: The current of news has been almost stagnant here recently, though the waters were again "troubled" yesterday afternoon by the arrival at headquarters of a courier from Ben. McCulloch and one from Gen. Jeff. Thompson. Mr. Connor, the courier from McCulloch, brings information that the command is now in Benton county, on the Osage river, some 430 miles from here, and in communication with Gen. Price, though these two Generals have not yet see fit to form a conjunction.--McCulloch's tr
Parrot guns into the exposed positions occupied by our troops. The loss on our side was about thirty, among whom is Col. Lowe and one Captain of infantry, whose name I could not obtain. It was the opinion of the courier, who was on the field throughout the battle, that the loss of the enemy could not be less than three or four hundred, and an indefinite number wounded. There are cases in which victory is decidedly with the vanquished, and this is one of them. The report that Mayfield, the county site of Graves county, some thirty miles from here, has been taken possession of by the Federals, seems to want confirmation. Some four hundred Federal cavalry remained in the town one day and night, and it is said that a regiment of infantry were within nine miles of the place, intending to occupy it, when word reached the place that a Mississippi regiment were marching upon it, and the cavalry incontinently fled, carrying the infantry back with them to Paducah, so May field i
es in Kentucky and Missouri we gather from our Southern exchanges: Thompson — particulars of recent Engagements, &c. An interesting letter appears in the Memphis Appeal, of the 29th ult., dated "Columbus, Ky., Oct. 26," from which we extract the following: The current of news has been almost stagnant here recently, though the waters were again "troubled" yesterday afternoon by the arrival at headquarters of a courier from Ben. McCulloch and one from Gen. Jeff. Thompson. Mr. Connor, the courier from McCulloch, brings information that the command is now in Benton county, on the Osage river, some 430 miles from here, and in communication with Gen. Price, though these two Generals have not yet see fit to form a conjunction.--McCulloch's troops were in good order, and eager for an opportunity to meet the enemy Gen. Price had fallen back from Lexington to a position higher out on the Osage, and was only restrained from giving Fremont battle by his want of ammunition, bein
January 27th (search for this): article 1
h wonders in "cleaning out" the rebels. The cannons were manufactured at Richmond, and were of such light weight as to be capable of being carried on the shoulders of the men. Last week the new and "improved" weapon that was to accomplish such wonders was publicly tested and proved a dead failure. The Storming of camp Wildcat — severe suffering on the march — incidents. An interesting letter is published in the Nashville (Tenn.) Banner, from its correspondent at Cumberland Ford, Oct. 27th, in relation to the march and attack on Camp Wildcat. We extract the following: It very soon became quite dark, and the sappers ahead were sent forward to clear away a blockade to the ford over Little Rock Castle river — the bridge having been destroyed and the enemy having blockaded the ford road by cutting trees across to prevent the approach of our cavalry. The camp, according to information received from one of the prisoners, was situated between the two Rock Castle rivers, and <
October 26th (search for this): article 1
From Kentucky and Missouri Eagerness of McCulloch's troops for a fight — the late engagement of Gen. Jeff. Thompson--the collision of forces at Greenville, &, &c. The following intelligence from the contending forces in Kentucky and Missouri we gather from our Southern exchanges: Thompson — particulars of recent Engagements, &c. An interesting letter appears in the Memphis Appeal, of the 29th ult., dated "Columbus, Ky., Oct. 26," from which we extract the following: The current of news has been almost stagnant here recently, though the waters were again "troubled" yesterday afternoon by the arrival at headquarters of a courier from Ben. McCulloch and one from Gen. Jeff. Thompson. Mr. Connor, the courier from McCulloch, brings information that the command is now in Benton county, on the Osage river, some 430 miles from here, and in communication with Gen. Price, though these two Generals have not yet see fit to form a conjunction.--McCulloch's tro
Zollicoffer (search for this): article 1
des, and noisy, talkative fellow, deserted us, and, I believe, went over to the enemy. It was the most exciting period, to me, of the whole expedition. Gen. Zollicoffer ordered our regiment, which headed the column, to charge forward. We went ahead at a double-quick, dashing through the creek nearly waist deep, and it causeloss killed in the engagement with the Lincolnites, at Camp Wildcat, Kentucky, and who have since died of their wounds, is 13. A reliable officer, just from Gen. Zollicoffer's command, states that a Kentucky lady (who came into camp to visit her husband, who is a prisoner) reports the number of the Lincolnites killed and wounded at 130. She is said to be an intelligent and well-informed woman, and her statement is believed to be correct. Thus, with the prisoners in Gen, Zollicoffer's hands, (about 40,) the arms and munitions captured, and the killed and wounded of the enemy, the engagement near Rockcastle seems to have been as brilliant a victory as many
Major. In an instant two hundred guns belched forth, hurling the fatal missiles among the devoted troopers. When asked afterwards by the Major why they hesitated to long, the boys said that the foe was to close, and they had so dead a thing on them that it looked like a shame to take that advantage of them. A Yankee Scoundrel A letter from Louisville, Ky., to the Cincinnati Gazette contains the following atrociously and infamously false statements: There are desperadoes in Buckner's camp uttering the most horrible threats against the women of Louisville. I declare what I know, and he who dares to deny it should be looked on as a conspirator to the same end. I know further, beyond doubt, that, in Nashville, the convicts in the State prison are being drilled daily, to make war upon the women and children of Kentucky and Ohio and Indiana. It there is any manhood in the freemen of the West, this should make every muscle of their bodies quiver with just and irresistible
Benjamin McCulloch (search for this): article 1
From Kentucky and Missouri Eagerness of McCulloch's troops for a fight — the late engagement of Gen. Jeff. Thompson--the collision of forces at Greenville, &, &c. The following ins were again "troubled" yesterday afternoon by the arrival at headquarters of a courier from Ben. McCulloch and one from Gen. Jeff. Thompson. Mr. Connor, the courier from McCulloch, brings informMcCulloch, brings information that the command is now in Benton county, on the Osage river, some 430 miles from here, and in communication with Gen. Price, though these two Generals have not yet see fit to form a conjunction.--McCulloch's troops were in good order, and eager for an opportunity to meet the enemy Gen. Price had fallen back from Lexington to a position higher out on the Osage, and was only restrained fromeplenishing of his military stores, and a conjunction effected between the forces of Price and McCulloch, Form out will be ground between these two commands like -fire in bark mill. Things are drawi
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