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United States (United States) (search for this): article 19
he result has not yet been given. At this precinct the vote for member of Congress stood: Smith 93; Scott 26. From a gentleman who came from Fairfax this evening, I learn a box was opened there, and that Smith received a majority of the votes cost for Congressman. Of course the Presidential vote was a unanimous thing. There has been none of the usual excitement and electioneering, every one taking it for granted that Davis and Stephens were the unanimous choice of the people of the Confederate states. The only other box open in this vicinity was at the 49th Virginia, but I am unable to give the result of the vote. The good news brought in the Dispatch concerning the damage to the armada, and the dissensions among the Yankees, has produced every happy effect upon the army. The soldiers forget their hardships in reading of the difficulties of the enemy, and begin to think, that after all everything has turned out for the best, Just let them alone, and they will whip themselves
Mexico, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 19
command, temporarily, of Gen. Longstreet's Brigade. This is a fitting recognition of the merit and gallant conduct of Col. Moore, who bravely won his spurs in the battle of Bull Run. The 17th Georgia regiment, Col. Henry L Benning, has elected Wesley Hodges, of Columbus, Georgia, Lieutenant-Colonel. The regiment is now attached to Gen. Toombs's brigade. Col. Hodges is a gallant and meritorious young man, universally popular, and is a fine drill officer. He served with distinction in Mexico, and was among the first to volunteer in the Georgia service. He was First Lieutenant of the Columbus Guards, Capt Ellis, of the 2d Georgia regiment, from which position he has lately been transferred. Lieut. Col. Tom Taylor of the 1st Kentucky, has been promoted to a Colonelcy, and continues in command of the regiment Major Johnston (son of Gen. A. S. Johnston) has been promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel, and Captain Jo. Desha. of company C, son of Gen. Lucius Desha, of Kentucky, has bee
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): article 19
al changes have been made within a few weeks which have not been noticed in the public prints. Gen. Kirby Smith sold brigade, composed of the 9th, 10th, and 11th Alabama and one regiment from Mississippi, is now under Gen. Wilcox, one of the newly made Brigadiers. Before the promotion of Gen. Smith the brigade was under J H Fornetor in the military Academy. At the beginning of the present troubles, Lieut. Forney was among the first to send in his resignation, and to offer his services to Alabama. He was made a Colonel in the State service and sent to Pensacola, where he was second in command, of. Forney there became very popular with the troops under hisnot speak of his qualifications as an officer, or of his characteristics He was the second Colonel in rank in the brigade, the third being Col. Sydenham Moore, of Alabama, a man well known in the South. I am told that Col. P. T. Moore, of the 1st Virginia regiment, has been placed in command, temporarily, of Gen. Longstreet's
George B. McClellan (search for this): article 19
into his entrenchments or taken a new shute towards our position. The latter seems hardly probable. A strange rumor is in circulation, one of those tales traceable to no particular origin, and yet believed on account of its probability, that McClellan has attempted an advance upon three different occasions, but retired each time because his men did not come up to the mark. Now, the rumor goes, he has given up entirely until the success of the armada shall inspire his men with confidence. Possibly this may be true; out, if so, only by accident. One thing now seems evident — McClellan does not intend to advance until the fleet is heard from, or until the Southern troops, hearing of the invasion of the Cotton States, shall have gone home and left Bull Run at his disposal. Yesterday a scouting party of about sixty Federal cavalry came up near Fairfax, and, Her making a reconnaissance, retired Our lines run about a mile this side the town, and upon a hill commanding a view of a
ency of the weather, but few people came out to the polls to vote for President and members of congress. This precinct has its box at the Medical Director's Office, formerly known as Carmon's Store. One hundred and fifty-two votes were cast for President and Vice President, and all for Davis and Stephens. The soldiers voted at their regiments, and the result has not yet been given. At this precinct the vote for member of Congress stood: Smith 93; Scott 26. From a gentleman who came from Fairfax this evening, I learn a box was opened there, and that Smith received a majority of the votes cost for Congressman. Of course the Presidential vote was a unanimous thing. There has been none of the usual excitement and electioneering, every one taking it for granted that Davis and Stephens were the unanimous choice of the people of the Confederate states. The only other box open in this vicinity was at the 49th Virginia, but I am unable to give the result of the vote. The good news
ol. Moore, who bravely won his spurs in the battle of Bull Run. The 17th Georgia regiment, Col. Henry L Benning, has elected Wesley Hodges, of Columbus, Georgia, Lieutenant-Colonel. The regiment is now attached to Gen. Toombs's brigade. Col. Hodges is a gallant and meritorious young man, universally popular, and is a fine drill officer. He served with distinction in Mexico, and was among the first to volunteer in the Georgia service. He was First Lieutenant of the Columbus Guards, Capt Ellis, of the 2d Georgia regiment, from which position he has lately been transferred. Lieut. Col. Tom Taylor of the 1st Kentucky, has been promoted to a Colonelcy, and continues in command of the regiment Major Johnston (son of Gen. A. S. Johnston) has been promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel, and Captain Jo. Desha. of company C, son of Gen. Lucius Desha, of Kentucky, has been appointed Major, Col. Taylor, of whom I have frequently spoken in my letters, has now one of the finest camps at this
f his qualifications as an officer, or of his characteristics He was the second Colonel in rank in the brigade, the third being Col. Sydenham Moore, of Alabama, a man well known in the South. I am told that Col. P. T. Moore, of the 1st Virginia regiment, has been placed in command, temporarily, of Gen. Longstreet's Brigade. This is a fitting recognition of the merit and gallant conduct of Col. Moore, who bravely won his spurs in the battle of Bull Run. The 17th Georgia regiment, Col. Henry L Benning, has elected Wesley Hodges, of Columbus, Georgia, Lieutenant-Colonel. The regiment is now attached to Gen. Toombs's brigade. Col. Hodges is a gallant and meritorious young man, universally popular, and is a fine drill officer. He served with distinction in Mexico, and was among the first to volunteer in the Georgia service. He was First Lieutenant of the Columbus Guards, Capt Ellis, of the 2d Georgia regiment, from which position he has lately been transferred. Lieut. Co
C. M. Wncox (search for this): article 19
t state. He built the first battery opposite Fort Pickens. When the Provisional Army was formed, Col. Forney entered the service as Colonel of the 9th Alabama Regiment.--Being the ranking Colonel of the brigade, he was put in command while Gen. Smith was at Richmond suffering from the wound received in the battle of the 21st. A short time ago, as is well known, Gen. Smith was made a jor General, and immediately after the command of the brigade was taken from Col. Forney and given to Col. C. M. Wncox, of the 10th Alabama, who was commissioned a Brigadier. Gen. Cadmus M. Wilcox is a resigned U. S. officer, born in North Carolina, is a citizen of Tennessee, and was appointed to West Point from that State. He entered the army as brevet 2d Lieutenant in the 4th infantry, July 1st, 1846 He was brevetted 1st Lieutenant Sept. 13th, 1847, and received his commission in full August 24th, 1851. Having no personal acquaintance with General Wilcox I cannot speak of his qualifications
dier recently appointed to General William Henry Walker's brigade, has arrived and taken command. There is no disguising the fact that the men are very much dissatisfied at the change. They are not half the fighting men they were two weeks ago I know nothing about the qualifications of Gen. Taylor for the position, and do not feel it liberty to take sides in the quarrel until acquainted with both. Captain Surzett, former aid to General Walker, has been appointed his Adjutant General. Captain Anderson, Adjutant to General Walker, has been ordered to Fernandina. On account of the inclemency of the weather, but few people came out to the polls to vote for President and members of congress. This precinct has its box at the Medical Director's Office, formerly known as Carmon's Store. One hundred and fifty-two votes were cast for President and Vice President, and all for Davis and Stephens. The soldiers voted at their regiments, and the result has not yet been given. At this preci
Praxiteles (search for this): article 19
limber. Over went the wagon, and over went its load, measuring their length in the dirtiest kind of mud. No injury was sustained beyond a few broken shins and skinned neses, and the unfortunates picked themselves out of the mud, to the great amusement of the commanding officer behind the tree. The wagon went home in pieces. One more horse story and I am done. Last year, Clark Mills, the sculptor, purchased a fine mare for a model. She was a beautiful little creature and had a form Praxiteles might have copied. After finishing the status upon which he was engaged, the sculptor presented the horse to Capt. Mason, of Mason's Hill. When the Yankees came up the first time the mare was stolen from the stable. A short time since Capt. Mason saw her in the possession of a brigade quartermaster and immediately identified her as his property. It seems a Yankee officer rode her in the battle of Manassas, and she was there captured by our men. I understand that General Dick Taylo
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