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South River (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 5
enna — even to creeks below Alexandria and along the road to Drainsville — that the enemy are not in force and do not hold the ground; but that they are in observation, and have their troops well thrown back towards the old position at Manassas. It is believed that the Confederates know every move of their opponents, who are not at all so fortunate. The negro population are thought to act for their masters with zeal and fidelity. We heard of regiments and guards of colored people down South, and when the Confederates were at Munson's Hill one of their most forward skirmishes — an indefatigable fellow, always loading and firing — was a black man. There has been no great reinforcements received by this army lately, in consequence of the diversion of Ohio and Illinois and Indiana troops to the State of Kentucky and to the West, and the largest estimate of the forces in the field does not raise it much above the numbers given in one of my recent letters. It is in the New England
New England (United States) (search for this): article 5
down South, and when the Confederates were at Munson's Hill one of their most forward skirmishes — an indefatigable fellow, always loading and firing — was a black man. There has been no great reinforcements received by this army lately, in consequence of the diversion of Ohio and Illinois and Indiana troops to the State of Kentucky and to the West, and the largest estimate of the forces in the field does not raise it much above the numbers given in one of my recent letters. It is in the New England States, and the emigration from them in the West, which have put forth their strength in the war for the Union, and the Puritan and Quaker element of the other States has been animated by a similar spirit. In the regiments in camp there are prayer meetings, and preaching, and revivals, and Young Men's Christian Associations; the Colonels give benediction, the Majors preach, the sergeants pray, and the battalions march, singing sternly-- "Old John Brown lies a mouldering in his grave
easant to get away sometimes from Cabinet Ministers and statesmen, though, truth to tell, the General is not much concerned about keeping them waiting, for as yet he feels his legs very strong under him. He is standing on the supports of all the United States, but one step may make him know his feet are of clay — that soft end yielding stuff which is only to be hardened in the fire of victorious battle. His quarters are in a pleasant house at the corner of a square — not unlike that of Gordon and Easton. By day the doors and windows are open; a sentry in blue tunic, blue cap blue trousers, all without what are called facings, brass buttons, with a distracted eagle there upon, and a waist belt with a brass buckle inscribed "U. S.," walks up and down, generally with a pipe or cigar in his mouth and his firelock carried horizontally over his shoulder, so as to bring the bayonet on a level with any eye of which the unwary owner may be coming round the corner. Several dragoon horses
Mr. Russell's letters to the London times. "Our Own" Criticises Mr. Seward and his Lake and Sea-coast defence circular — the Politician's Anxiety for a War with England, &c. [from the special Correspondence of the London Times.] Washington, Oct. 19. --In my last letter, in the hurry of closing the envelope, a copy of Mr. Seward's circular and some remarks upon it were omitted; but the omission is of little consequence, as the mail must have taken over the document and the news of the effect produced by it in New York and other cities of the United States. The immediate impression in every one's mind was, "Mr. Seward is aware of some action on the part of England, which must result in war" "The Secretary is bent on doing something which will lead to a war with England" I infer these reflections from the words of many people I met last week. The whole American people will, I doubt not, sustain Mr. Seward's tone and position, and certainly the dispatch to whic
Americans (search for this): article 5
Mr. Seward's tone and position, and certainly the dispatch to which he had to reply was not a very remarkable one, not quite worthy, perhaps, of the Foreign Office. The effect of these arguments will be best treated at the other side of the Atlantic, but it may be remarked that the cases selected for remonstrance were far from being the strongest that could have been found. Every word that comes from Great Britain, every act that is done by her, is closely — nay, unjustly — construed by Americans. She may not look over the hedge, while France can steal a horse if she please. The suspicious jealous, shrewish young lady detects foul play in every movement of her mother-in-law, and will "brave none of that." I actually heard an officer find fault with Lieut Grant, of Her Majesty's ship Steady, because he was not quite pleased with the Captain of the United States ship Vandalia, off Charleston, for firing a round shot across his bows to bring him to. This one reads continually o
Delafield (search for this): article 5
he United States ship Vandalia, off Charleston, for firing a round shot across his bows to bring him to. This one reads continually of the good faith of France in her neutrality and of the perfidy of England. When the French officers in the Crimean snubbed Gen. McClellan and his brother commissioners, not a word was said of it aloud, nor was there, on the other hand the least expression of satisfaction at the cordial reception of the commissioners by the English authorities, and but for Col. Delafield's report nothing would have been known of the facts. Had the case been reversed we should have been threatened with nothing short of war — a menace, by the by, which might almost be stereotyped in some of the most widely read, and therefore least influential of the American journals. Since my last letter up to this date little has occurred of interest or importance. Reconnaissances have pushed out carefully from the front of the Federal army, and have discovered as far as Fairfax
et away sometimes from Cabinet Ministers and statesmen, though, truth to tell, the General is not much concerned about keeping them waiting, for as yet he feels his legs very strong under him. He is standing on the supports of all the United States, but one step may make him know his feet are of clay — that soft end yielding stuff which is only to be hardened in the fire of victorious battle. His quarters are in a pleasant house at the corner of a square — not unlike that of Gordon and Easton. By day the doors and windows are open; a sentry in blue tunic, blue cap blue trousers, all without what are called facings, brass buttons, with a distracted eagle there upon, and a waist belt with a brass buckle inscribed "U. S.," walks up and down, generally with a pipe or cigar in his mouth and his firelock carried horizontally over his shoulder, so as to bring the bayonet on a level with any eye of which the unwary owner may be coming round the corner. Several dragoon horses are hitche
Pelissier (search for this): article 5
presence, nor is he destitute of the art of making himself invisible when he pleases. His staff are excellent men, I am told, so far as my personal experience goes, nor could any commander be served more efficiently than the General is by such men as Brigadier General Vanvilet, or Colonel Hunson, notwithstanding the absence of a good deal of stiffness which marks the approach to some headquarters, as General found when he and his brother Commissioner sought in vain to obtain access to Marshal Pelissier in the Crimea. the General, a short time ago an employee on the General Illinois Railway, but still with so much of the old spirit in him that he studied closely all the movements of that short Italian campaign, of which he is not doomed to give a counter part in this part of the world, is a nocturne, and at the close of long laborious days, works hard and fast late into the night, till sleep pursues and overtakes him, when he surrenders readily, for he has one of those natures wh
McClellan (search for this): article 5
m to. This one reads continually of the good faith of France in her neutrality and of the perfidy of England. When the French officers in the Crimean snubbed Gen. McClellan and his brother commissioners, not a word was said of it aloud, nor was there, on the other hand the least expression of satisfaction at the cordial receptionculty in transmitting their pay to their friends at home, as there is no system of money orders known to the post-offices of this country. October 20th.--Gen. McClellan--in some perplexity, probably in reference to the course to be adopted towards such an elastic enemy, who gives way before pressure only to spring out when itgineers could do little to assist him; and their efforts to reconnoitre on the Thursday before Bull's Run served only to show they were dangerous and futile.--Gen. McClellan left his quarters in Washington on Friday, and ... gave rise to many of the queer eccentricities of expression called rumors. It must be pleasant to get awa
Mr. Russell's letters to the London times. "Our Own" Criticises Mr. Seward and his Lake and Sea-coast defence circular — the Politician's Anxiety for a War with England, &c. [from the special Correspondence of the London Times.] Washington, Oct. 19. --In my last letter, in the hurry of closing the envelope, a copy of Mr. Seward's circular and some remarks upon it were omitted; but the omission is of little consequence, as the mail must have taken over the document and the news of the effect produced by it in New York and other cities of the United States. The immediate impression in every one's mind was, "Mr. Seward is aware of some action on the part of England, which must result in war" "The Secretary is bent on doing something which will lead to a war with England" I infer these reflections from the words of many people I met last week. The whole American people will, I doubt not, sustain Mr. Seward's tone and position, and certainly the dispatch to whi
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