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United States (United States) (search for this): article 21
hat the thanks of this General Assembly are hereby tendered to the loyal and brave men of Kentucky who have volunteered to aid and assist the Government of the United States in expelling the invaders from our soil." This resolution was adopted — yeas 69, nays 11--Messrs. Ash, Burns, Bush, Chambers, Edmunds, Gardner, Garrett, s Commonwealth, who shall be absent from the county of his residence sixty days, or who shall have taken service, either civil or military, in the so-called Confederate States, or Government, or who shall have entered voluntarily within the lines of the military forces of said Confederates, with a view to favor or assist them, dirarrying on this private mail system for a long time, and was a most valuable ally of the rebels. He was arrested at Paris, and the twain were sent down to the United States authorities in Covington for imprisonment. After remaining in jail for a short time, the news of the arrest got abroad, and some secession sympathizers in the
Calhoun, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 21
he field. A Singular character--Federal distrust of Kentuckians, &c. From the Louisville (Bowling Green) Courier, of the 28th ult., we extract the following items: There is a soldier in one of the companies at Hopkinsville who never wore a hat. Acting upon the maxim of Franklin, he seems determined to keep his head cool.--He is certainly an acentric character, but he has fire in his eye and strength in his arm. A gentleman informs us that while near Crittenden's camp at Calhoun, the other day, he learned that the distrust of Kentuckians is so great that none are permitted to do picket duty for fear they will desert. It must be very comfortable to the Kentuckians to be treated in this way by their "brethren" of the North. It is a notable fact that they are nowhere sent in advance. Blowing up of a grist Mill. The Bowling Green Courier, of the 28th, says: About 2 o'clock on Christmas morning, a steam grist mill, while being used by the 5th Kentucky r
Montgomery County (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 21
the Louisville Journal shows how Kentuckians are seized by the Yankee authorities and forcibly hurried out of the State, in defiance of law and justice: We learn from the Cincinnati papers that Deputy U. S. Marshal C. B. Pettit, of Bourbon county, arrived at Covington on Tuesday, having in custody C. C. Rogers, of Paris, and John Higgins, of Magoffin county, both noted rebels, who have for a length of time been giving aid and comfort to the rebels. Higgins was taken prisoner in Montgomery county, a few days since, by Capt. G. N. Hall, of Col. Epperson's regiment — He has been supplying the rebels with provisions and other means of sustenance.--Rogers had a number of letters in his possession, from parties of the State, to friends and relatives in the Southern army. One of the letters is from Frank Trontman, of Paris, law partner of Wm. E. Simms, now a Captain in the rebel army, and it details the condition of Simms's property and affairs, and conveys other information qu
Oldham (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 21
he United States in expelling the invaders from our soil." This resolution was adopted — yeas 69, nays 11--Messrs. Ash, Burns, Bush, Chambers, Edmunds, Gardner, Garrett, Hampton, Johnson, Lindsey, and Murphy voting in the negative. These gentlemen have steadily voted upon every proposition as if they were the representatives of the Southern Confederacy. This evidence of sympathy for treason created astonishment and indignation. Richard T. Jacob, the bold and fearless member from Oldham county, offered the following resolution, which, under the rules of the House, was referred to the appropriate committee: "Resolved, That a select committee be instructed to inquire why gentlemen in this House give aid and comfort in the invaders of our soil, by voting no to a vote of thanks to our noble defenders, and to inquire why they should not be expelled from this House." In presenting this resolution Mr. Jacob said: "I offered the resolution for this reason — our State has b
Covington (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 21
al shows how Kentuckians are seized by the Yankee authorities and forcibly hurried out of the State, in defiance of law and justice: We learn from the Cincinnati papers that Deputy U. S. Marshal C. B. Pettit, of Bourbon county, arrived at Covington on Tuesday, having in custody C. C. Rogers, of Paris, and John Higgins, of Magoffin county, both noted rebels, who have for a length of time been giving aid and comfort to the rebels. Higgins was taken prisoner in Montgomery county, a few daysuite interesting to the rebel Captain, Rogers has been carrying on this private mail system for a long time, and was a most valuable ally of the rebels. He was arrested at Paris, and the twain were sent down to the United States authorities in Covington for imprisonment. After remaining in jail for a short time, the news of the arrest got abroad, and some secession sympathizers in the city made an effort to procure the release of the prisoners on a writ of habeas corpus, but Deputy U. S. Surv
nator, was predicated upon his expulsion. In the House, Mr. Thomas offered the following resolution: "Resolved by the General Assembly of the Commonwealth of Kentucky, That the thanks of this General Assembly are hereby tendered to the loyal and brave men of Kentucky who have volunteered to aid and assist the Government of the United States in expelling the invaders from our soil." This resolution was adopted — yeas 69, nays 11--Messrs. Ash, Burns, Bush, Chambers, Edmunds, Gardner, Garrett, Hampton, Johnson, Lindsey, and Murphy voting in the negative. These gentlemen have steadily voted upon every proposition as if they were the representatives of the Southern Confederacy. This evidence of sympathy for treason created astonishment and indignation. Richard T. Jacob, the bold and fearless member from Oldham county, offered the following resolution, which, under the rules of the House, was referred to the appropriate committee: "Resolved, That a select committe
in command, with instructions to decoy the enemy up the hill where I could use my infantry and artillery with effect, and be out of the range of the enemy's batteries. Before returning to the column, the fire from the skirmishers re-commenced. The enemy appeared in force upon my right and centre. Col. Terry, at the head of 75 Rangers, charged about 300, routed and drove them back, but fell mortally wounded. A body of the enemy, of about the same size, attacked the Rangers, under Capt. Ferrell, upon the right of the turnpike, and were repulsed with heavy loss. The enemy now began crossing by regiments, and moving about on my right and left flanks. Three companies of Col. Marmaduke's (1st Ark.) battalion were thrown out as skirmishers on my left, engaged the enemy's right, and drove them to the river. I now ordered forward Capt. Switt's battery and the 2d Arkansas regiment to support it, holding the 6th Arkansas regiment in reserve. The artillery opened fire upon the enemy
B. S. Bradford (search for this): article 21
Fowler22Nov, 20Nov, 30 Robert Brown40Nov, 20Nov, 30 Ar Clesell40Nov, 27Dec, 2 Joakin Layman40Nov, 27Dec, 6 J, Kelly30Nov, 27Dec, 6 James patton33Nov, 27Dec, 6 C. Schoonberger40Nov, 25Dec, 6 McHenry Meader40Nov, 25Dec, 4 Jacob Haydon25Nov, 25Dec, 4 John Cullen31Nov, 25Dec, 4 T. H. Shacklett18Nov, 25Dec, 4 R. W. Shacklett24Nov, 25Dec, 4 James Gregory25Nov, 25Dec, 4 H. Cunningham24Nov, 25Dec, 4 Pat Byan26Nov, 25Dec, 4 Thomas Scott27Nov, 25Dec, 4 Thomas Larkin27Nov, 30Dec, 1 B. S. Bradford27Nov, 30Dec, 1 J. H. Menner39Dec, 2Dec, 7 J. H. Smith34Dec, 2Dec, 7 V. F. Kenkton34Dec, 2Dec, 7 M. F. Scott27Dec, 4Dec, 7 Hiram Roberts19Dec, 4Dec, 11 James H. Westbay33Dec, 4Dec, 16 Jame Hinkle33Dec, 6Dec, 7 John Dolan33Dec, 1Dec, 7 Wm. F. Beck31Dec, 7Dec, 8 Charles Marenat36Dec, 8Dec, 8 W. W. Williams33Dec, 9Dec, 8 The above list does not include the names of those who have been indicted for treasonable conduct, such parsons having been consigned to the county jail.
Abraham Lincoln (search for this): article 21
ogress of the Southern cause in the Blue Grass section. He reports that Unionism is dead in that section, killed off by Lincoln and Cameron's abolition scheme. Except among some designing Lincolnites in the towns, no one is heard to speak a word in favor of Lincoln; but the feeling is unanimous for the South. From every county men are constantly going out in squads to join Gen. Humphrey Marshall's army, whose men have become so bold that they come down into the counties so recently overrun hem hence." The Dick Jacob so applauded by the Abolitionist of the Commercial is a chap who, until he was bought by Lincoln, was so intensely Southern that he could find no fire-eater sufficiently intense for him. He and Fremont married sisters, and his present position is no doubt due to the exertion and management of Fremont. Now he is always ready to do Lincoln's dirty work, and in the bogus Legislature he is the most abject and contemptible of all the Lincolnites there. Mr. Spe
J. H. Menner (search for this): article 21
Fowler22Nov, 20Nov, 30 Robert Brown40Nov, 20Nov, 30 Ar Clesell40Nov, 27Dec, 2 Joakin Layman40Nov, 27Dec, 6 J, Kelly30Nov, 27Dec, 6 James patton33Nov, 27Dec, 6 C. Schoonberger40Nov, 25Dec, 6 McHenry Meader40Nov, 25Dec, 4 Jacob Haydon25Nov, 25Dec, 4 John Cullen31Nov, 25Dec, 4 T. H. Shacklett18Nov, 25Dec, 4 R. W. Shacklett24Nov, 25Dec, 4 James Gregory25Nov, 25Dec, 4 H. Cunningham24Nov, 25Dec, 4 Pat Byan26Nov, 25Dec, 4 Thomas Scott27Nov, 25Dec, 4 Thomas Larkin27Nov, 30Dec, 1 B. S. Bradford27Nov, 30Dec, 1 J. H. Menner39Dec, 2Dec, 7 J. H. Smith34Dec, 2Dec, 7 V. F. Kenkton34Dec, 2Dec, 7 M. F. Scott27Dec, 4Dec, 7 Hiram Roberts19Dec, 4Dec, 11 James H. Westbay33Dec, 4Dec, 16 Jame Hinkle33Dec, 6Dec, 7 John Dolan33Dec, 1Dec, 7 Wm. F. Beck31Dec, 7Dec, 8 Charles Marenat36Dec, 8Dec, 8 W. W. Williams33Dec, 9Dec, 8 The above list does not include the names of those who have been indicted for treasonable conduct, such parsons having been consigned to the county jail.
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