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Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 14
agglers" would not amount to more than one hundred. This is strictly true, and redounds to our immortal honor. These facts are true of Wilcox's, Pryor's, and Featherstone's brigades, who formed our right, and we are positive that from the composition of Whiting's, Hood's, and Pender's brigades, who flanked the enemy and formed our left, they never could be made to falter, for Whiting had the 11th 16th and 2nd Mississippi, and two other regiments, unknown to us — Hood had four Texan and one Georgia regiment, and the material of Pender's command was equally as good as any, and greatly distinguished itself. These were the troops mostly engaged and that suffered most. It is gross injustice in any to talk of our troops making "three charges," "repulses," &c., &c. Our troops received the command but once, and if Satan and all his host had confronted them, instead of mortal Yankees, the result would have been the same. There were no repulses — all arrangements worked like a charm; and we
A. Bagwell (search for this): article 14
't S. Strother and Private Robt Hines, killed; Corporal Wm. B. Allen, Marion Knowles, Geo. Young, Benton Graves, Daniel Lancaster, Thos. Mallory, and Thomas Ryder, wounded. The company lost fully one third of their horses, and had three of their guns disabled. All the pieces were brought off the field, however, though, owing to a lack of horses, some had to be dragged away by hand Casualties in Co. E., 44th Ga. Regiment, engaged before Ellyson's Mills, Thursday evening: Killed--Privates A. Bagwell, J. Lee, E. Davis, R. M. Dawson, J. H. Digby. Missing — W. J Reeves. M. P. Swinney. Wounded--Capt. J. W. Adams, slightly in arm; Lieut. J H. Connally, slightly in chest; Lieut. S. A Scott, slightly in shoulder and knee; Lieut Manly, in hand and knee; Corp'l A C Cald well, badly; Corp'l T. L. Hatcher; Corp'l Madden, slightly; Privates J. M. Davis, W. S. Brown, J. W. Perkins, slightly; E. G. Curbow, badly; Daniel Curbow, slightly; Wm Bagwell, J. A. Collins, Joseph Beall, Robert Norris
of woods behind an abattis of felled timber and brushwood. The Georgians advanced spiritedly upon the Yankees and drove them back, not, however, until they had fought desperately for the ground. Finding it unfavorable to flank our force, the Yankees withdrew and left us in possession of the field. It was maintained until orders were sent for Gen. Toombs to retire. Our total loss may be summed up as follows Killed 24; wounded 160, and 4 missing, up to the time the reports came in Col. McIntosh of the 15th, lost his leg, Capt. Birch was killed' Capt. Tilley dangerously wounded, and Lt. Edwards slightly wounded. This engagement was a spirited and creditable affair, General Toombs obeying strictly his written orders. Gen. Lee pushed his advance until 10 o'clock last night, (Saturday,) and at 11 was in occupancy of the York River Railroad, the enemy's principal line of communication. This in effect pierces the enemy's centre, and separates their forces on the northside of th
lled' Capt. Tilley dangerously wounded, and Lt. Edwards slightly wounded. This engagement was a spirited and creditable affair, General Toombs obeying strictly his written orders. Gen. Lee pushed his advance until 10 o'clock last night, (Saturday,) and at 11 was in occupancy of the York River Railroad, the enemy's principal line of communication. This in effect pierces the enemy's centre, and separates their forces on the northside of the Chickahominy from those on the southside. Brig. Gen. Riker is among the prisoners brought to the city yesterday morning. Miscellaneous. Among the wounded may be mentioned Maj. John M. Daniel, editor of the Richmond Examiner, and late of Gen. Floyd's staff, but now acting with Gen. Hill. His arm was shattered. Capt. Wm. Randall, company K, 1st Louisiana, was not killed as at first reported. He received a severe wound in the right arm at the elbow joint. Maj. Edward Savage, N. C. State troops, was among the wounded.
H. H. Gibson (search for this): article 14
ves. M. P. Swinney. Wounded--Capt. J. W. Adams, slightly in arm; Lieut. J H. Connally, slightly in chest; Lieut. S. A Scott, slightly in shoulder and knee; Lieut Manly, in hand and knee; Corp'l A C Cald well, badly; Corp'l T. L. Hatcher; Corp'l Madden, slightly; Privates J. M. Davis, W. S. Brown, J. W. Perkins, slightly; E. G. Curbow, badly; Daniel Curbow, slightly; Wm Bagwell, J. A. Collins, Joseph Beall, Robert Norris, J. Norris, F. J. Weldon, Green Allison, W. S. Futral, N. T. Gibson, H. H. Gibson, Wm. Jester, T. T. Bishop. Engagement at Coal Harbor. In the fight on Friday, Johnson's Battery, of this city, occupied an exposed position on the Coal Harbor road, about one mile from Coal Harbor, and was subjected to a fire remarkable for its accuracy, which (as an eye witness informs us) the command encountered without flinching Capt. Johnson was conspicuous for his bravery throughout the period in which his battery was engaged, and our informant says that not an inch of groun
Jno Sanders (search for this): article 14
wounded, prisoners, wagons, cannon, &c., scattered in inextricable confusion upon the road! Thus, for four hours, did our inferior force, unaided by a single piece of artillery, withstand over thirty thousand of the enemy, assisted by twenty-six pieces of artillery! In total, we captured many prisoners, and thirty peices of artillery up to 5 P. M. Friday, and in the battle of Gaines's Mills, captured 26 field-peices, 15,000 stand of arms, 6 stand of colors, three Generals, (Reynolds, Sanders and Rankin,) and over 4,000 prisoners, including dozens of officers of every grade — from Colonel to Lieutenants of the line. The Federal force. Every arm of the service was well represented in the Federal line — cavalry were there in force, and when our men emerged from the woods, attempted to charge, but the three brigades on the right, and Jackson's three brigades on the left, closed up ranks and poured such deadly volleys upon the horsemen, that they left the ground in confusio
The following is a list of casualties in the Purcell Battery, in the battle of Thursday evening last: Killed--Lieut. Wm. A. Allen; Corporal Murphy, Privates Boyd and Stillman. Wounded--Lieut. H. M. Fitzhugh; Serg't Crow, McGruder, Temple, Ball, Messier; Corporals Eddins, Beck; Privates Beckham, Cheatham, Thos. Berry, Donahoe, Geo. Dockerty, Davis, Daniel, Ege, Flemming, Finnell, Mott, Grigsby, Herring, Holland, Heart, Harrow, Geo. W. Johnston, E. P. Jones, W. T. Flint, James, Kimball, Mitchell, Mahoney, McLeod, Morton, O Brien, F. S. Price, Ritchie, Rose, Sacrey, T. H. Thompson, B. M. Temple, Partington, W. T. Smith, T. T. Yager. This list proves the desperate bravery exhibited by the command in the bloody strife.--We learn that Mr. Dawson, a young English man, who came over in the Nashville, volunteered for the engagement, and received a wound while acting most gallantly. The Crenshaw Battery, of this city, (attached to Gregg's brigade,) acted with distinguis
George P. Foote (search for this): article 14
ties of attack at this position were such that it is impossible to give a correct idea without maps — the battery being on a height, flanked by rifle pits, a deep creek at the foot of the hill, and covered with a thick hedge. A daring attack. The attack of our men on this position was impetuous and daring, but the loss was great, for the foe were so screened by their position it was impossible to get at them properly. Their loss was severe. Gen. Featherstone's Adjutant General, Geo. P. Foote, was shot while riding far in advance of the 12th Mississippi, and although hailed to return, he did not, and was quickly singled out and mortally wounded. His body was shortly afterwards found despoiled — watch, money, and swordsmen. The 12th Mississippi went out in the morning with 397 men, lost in this engagement 12 killed, 68 wounded, and 9 missing; the regiment was commanded by Major W. H. Lilly. who was wounded leading a charge,--the Colonel being absent and sick, and the Lieute
in the battle of Thursday evening last: Killed--Lieut. Wm. A. Allen; Corporal Murphy, Privates Boyd and Stillman. Wounded--Lieut. H. M. Fitzhugh; Serg't Crow, McGruder, Temple, Ball, Messier; Corporals Eddins, Beck; Privates Beckham, Cheatham, Thos. Berry, Donahoe, Geo. Dockerty, Davis, Daniel, Ege, Flemming, Finnell, Mott, Grigsby, Herring, Holland, Heart, Harrow, Geo. W. Johnston, E. P. Jones, W. T. Flint, James, Kimball, Mitchell, Mahoney, McLeod, Morton, O Brien, F. S. Price, Ritchie, Rose, Sacrey, T. H. Thompson, B. M. Temple, Partington, W. T. Smith, T. T. Yager. This list proves the desperate bravery exhibited by the command in the bloody strife.--We learn that Mr. Dawson, a young English man, who came over in the Nashville, volunteered for the engagement, and received a wound while acting most gallantly. The Crenshaw Battery, of this city, (attached to Gregg's brigade,) acted with distinguished gallantry in Friday's battle. The casualties are: Serg't S. S
sissippi battalion lost 106 killed and wounded, out of 234 taken into action in the morning. The following is a list of casualties in the Purcell Battery, in the battle of Thursday evening last: Killed--Lieut. Wm. A. Allen; Corporal Murphy, Privates Boyd and Stillman. Wounded--Lieut. H. M. Fitzhugh; Serg't Crow, McGruder, Temple, Ball, Messier; Corporals Eddins, Beck; Privates Beckham, Cheatham, Thos. Berry, Donahoe, Geo. Dockerty, Davis, Daniel, Ege, Flemming, Finnell, Mott, Grigsby, Herring, Holland, Heart, Harrow, Geo. W. Johnston, E. P. Jones, W. T. Flint, James, Kimball, Mitchell, Mahoney, McLeod, Morton, O Brien, F. S. Price, Ritchie, Rose, Sacrey, T. H. Thompson, B. M. Temple, Partington, W. T. Smith, T. T. Yager. This list proves the desperate bravery exhibited by the command in the bloody strife.--We learn that Mr. Dawson, a young English man, who came over in the Nashville, volunteered for the engagement, and received a wound while acting most gallantly.
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