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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: November 10, 1862., [Electronic resource].

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tillery, and a considerable force of cavalry. They are also reported to have landed a large force at Palmyra, Halifax co., some twenty-five or thirty miles from Weldon.--Gen. Pettigrew commands the Confederate force at Weldon. The Yankees are said to be commanded by Gen. Foster. There was a report in circulation on Saturday that an engagement occurred in the vicinity of Tarboro', Edgecombe county, on Thursday last, between some six regiments of N. C. State troops under the command of Gov. Vance and Gen. Martin, and about 10,000 of the enemy. The Raleigh Journal, of Saturday, says that this report was incorrect, and that nothing of the kind had taken place since the fight of Sunday evening. The impression prevails that the enemy is concentrating his forces in the neighborhood of Williamston, Martin county, with the intention of attacking some point on the line of the Wilmington and Weldon Railroad. A dispatch from Goldsboro', dated ten o'clock Friday night, states that t
Capt. Vodges's company alone, left the Chesapeake for Fort Pickens about January 22d, and on the 29th President Buchanan, having entered into a quasi armistice with certain leading Seceders at Pensacola and elsewhere, caused Secretaries Holt and Toucey to instruct, in a joint note, the commander of the war vessel off Pensacola, and Lieut, Siemmer, commanding Fort Pickens, to commit no act of hostility, and not to land Capt. Vodges's company unless the fort should be attacked" He afterwards stateinforcements thus provided for as sufficient. This was ready to sail for Fort Sumter on five hours notice. It is of this expedition that General Scott thus speaks: "At that time, when this (the truce) had passed away, Secretaries Holt and Toucey, Capt. Ward, of the navy, and myself, with the knowledge of the President, settled upon the employment, under the Captain, of three or four steamers belonging to the Coast Survey, but he was kept back by the truce." A strange inconsistency.
to Colonel Scott to countermand her departure; but it did not reach its destination until after she had gone to sea. The reason for this countermand shall be stated in the language of Secretary Holt, to be found in a letter addressed by him to Mr. Thompson, the late Secretary of the interior, on the 5th of March, 1861, and published in the National Intelligence. Mr. Holt says: "The countermand spoken of (by Mr. Thompson) was not more cordially sanctioned by the President than it was by GenMr. Thompson) was not more cordially sanctioned by the President than it was by General Scott and myself; not because of any dissent from the order on the part of the President, but because of a letter received that day from Maj Anderson, stating, in effect, that he regarded himself secure in his position; and yet more from intelligence which late on Saturday evening, (5th January, 1861,) reached the Department that a heavy battery had been erected among the sand hills, at the entrance to Charleston harbor, which would probably destroy any unarmed vessel (and such was the Sta
Fort Pickens (Florida, United States) (search for this): article 6
and St. Philip, on the Mississippi, Fort Morgan, below Mobile; Forts Pickens and McRae, in Pensacola harbor; Fort Pulaski. below Savannah; klyn, with Capt. Vodges's company alone, left the Chesapeake for Fort Pickens about January 22d, and on the 29th President Buchanan, having enwith his brave little command, had been forced to take refuge in Fort Pickens, where he was in imminent danger every moment of being captured ovisions, and military stores were dispatched by the Brooklyn to Fort Pickens without a moment's un- necessary delay. She left Fortress Monreinforcements, with the vessels of war at no great distance from Fort Pickens, could not arrive in time to defend it against the impending attl as the most positive assurance that no attack would be made on Fort Pickens if the present status should be preserved. This proposal wat arrive at Pensacola until the 5th of February. In the meantime Fort Pickens, with Lieutenant Slemmer (whose conduct deserves high commendati
Buras (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): article 6
original, now in my possession, is curiously omitted in the version published in the National Intelligencer. He designates no capital for the fourth Union on the Pacific. The reader will judge what encouragement these views, proceeding from so distinguished a source, must have afforded to the Secessionists of the cotton States. I trust I have said enough, and more than enough, to convince every mind why I did not, with a force of five companies, attempt to reinforce Forts Jackson and St. Philip, on the Mississippi, Fort Morgan, below Mobile; Forts Pickens and McRae, in Pensacola harbor; Fort Pulaski. below Savannah; Forts Moultrie and Sumter, Charleston harbor, and Fort Monroe, in Virginia. These "views," both original and supplementary, were published by Gen. Scott in the National Intelligencer, of January 18th, 1861, at the most important and critical period of the Administration.--Their publication at that time could do no possible good, and might do much harm. To have
Alton (Illinois, United States) (search for this): article 6
h ours, sink into mere child's play." In the General's opinion, "a smaller evil (than these intestine wars) would be to allow the fragments of the great Republic to form themselves into new Confederacies, probably four. " He then points out what ought to be the boundaries between the new Unions; and at the end of each, goes so far as even to indicate the cities which ought to be the capitals of the three first on this side of the Rocky Mountains to wit: "Columbia, South Carolina;" "Alton, or Quiney, III," and "Albany, New York," excluding Washington City altogether. This indication of capitals contained in the original, now in my possession, is curiously omitted in the version published in the National Intelligencer. He designates no capital for the fourth Union on the Pacific. The reader will judge what encouragement these views, proceeding from so distinguished a source, must have afforded to the Secessionists of the cotton States. I trust I have said enough, and mo
Covington (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 5
ng to $371,809.96, left a balance of nett revenues of $644,347.81. A large proportion of this sum has been expended in paying dividends and other indebtedness of the company. Cost of road, including last ten miles from Jackson's river depot to Covington, and equipment to Oct. 1st, is $5.918,882.84. Total cost of completing road to Covington, $10,000 additional. Distance from Richmond to Eastern terminus of the Covington and Ohio Railroad, 205 miles; the Blue Ridge Railroad, owned by the StateCovington, $10,000 additional. Distance from Richmond to Eastern terminus of the Covington and Ohio Railroad, 205 miles; the Blue Ridge Railroad, owned by the State, 17 miles long, being included therein. Length of road owned by the company 188 miles; cost of same per mile, $30,535.61. Total liabilities of company, $1,357,198.30. In reference to the capacity of railroads to continue operations during the present war, it is stated that if the speed of the trains is judiciously reduced, with reference to the depreciation of the rails, our roads will last many years longer. Last summer the road between Hanover C H. and Richmond was in possession o
Orange Court House (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 5
damage has all been repaired. The buildings at Beaver dam and the bridge across Cow pasture river were destroyed by the enemy with fire. The first are being rebuilt, the latter will be as soon as suitable timber can be procured, the rapidity of the stream necessitating a permanent bridge. The earnings of the road during the fiscal year from all sources were as follows: Passengers, $700,194.25; freight, $252,982.29; express freight, $44,555.81; mail service, $13,746.32; use of road by Orange and Alexandria road, $4,064.06; miscellaneous sources, $165; dividends on telegraph stock, $241.50; rent of real estate, $477.94. Total receipts, $1,016,157.77. The expenses were as follows: Conducting transportation, including miscellaneous, legal expenses, &c, $126,877.85; repairs of locomotives and cars, $67,353.15; repairs of workshops and tools, $2,892.59; maintenance of way, including repairs of depots and water stations, $109,607.21; for salaries of employees, $13,506; taxes, inc
New England (United States) (search for this): article 1
n and tobacco, the great staples of the world, all passed through their hands on their way to a foreign market. The very negroes, for whose sake they were constantly threatening the South, were a source of far more profit to them than they have ever been to their masters. The cotton and tobacco of the South were, indeed, the grand levers that set all Northern trade in motion. Without them New York would never have risen much above the figure that represented her population in 1810, and New England would have been, where she ought to be now, at the tall of the Union. The Democrats could see all this, but the Republicans could not, and they persisted until they destroyed the Union. The Democrats now wish to restore that Union, because while it existed it was a source of unalloyed prosperity. They see plainly enough that if the North be compelled to pay the same duties with England, England will supplant the manufactures of the North. They see that if direct trade between our
Goldsboro (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 2
nts of N. C. State troops under the command of Gov. Vance and Gen. Martin, and about 10,000 of the enemy. The Raleigh Journal, of Saturday, says that this report was incorrect, and that nothing of the kind had taken place since the fight of Sunday evening. The impression prevails that the enemy is concentrating his forces in the neighborhood of Williamston, Martin county, with the intention of attacking some point on the line of the Wilmington and Weldon Railroad. A dispatch from Goldsboro', dated ten o'clock Friday night, states that there had been no fighting, and that the enemy had retreated in the direction of Weldon. We do not exactly understand now they could have retreated towards Weldon, since that is the point towards which they were supposed to be advancing. A letter in the Petersburg Express, from Tarboro', dated the 8th, says the Yankee army is marching upon that town with 12,000 troops. The information is derived from a Yankee deserter.--They are represen
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