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.--Clark, of the Butler Delta was there, resembling a punctured balloon, from which the gas was rapidly exhaling. French was there. He is now positively superceded, though it is not publicly announced. His brilliant financial arrangement with Bryant's gambling saloon — in which that house, besides its regular license fee — paid five hundred dollars per month to French, which was never accounted for. Of all Gen. Benjamin F. Butler's brilliant staff the only one whose hands are clear is Col. Stafford, who is really an honest man. He was compelled to take his present position for refusing to assist his political friends in stealing. Our streets are filled with a great quantity of crinoline, and to a stranger would look as usual, but indeed it is not so, for rarely do you meet on Canal street with a familiar face. Our ladies do not go out much; the stores are almost deserted, and none of them are importing. The handily dressed feminines are Yankee women. How different they look
Washington (search for this): article 8
s, potatoes $1.99, and other things in proportion. Banks has been so much more stringent in preventing intercourse with the Confederates that the little trade Butler permitted to his favorites Banks has stopped, and when be does grant a permit, a few miles out of the city it is not respected. Certain parties here shipped goods upon a permit from Banks to Baton Rouge. As soon as they arrived there they were seized by some of the officers, who declared they only recognized orders from Washington. Banks's first interview with Butler has not been noticed in any of our papers that I have seen, and I must give you a sketch of it as I had it from--;never mind who. Butler advanced towards Banks with his usual graceful empressement, and begged him, during his stay in New Orleans, to come to his house, as he had rooms already prepared for him. Banks replied he would remain at the St. Charles Hotel, as he did not choose to live in confiscated houses. He then drew his official documen
on the great levee of the Crescent city yesterday. Gen. Banks has issued an order prohibiting the "foreclosure of mortppeal, we take the following gossip of interest: When Banks first came here with his great expedition, that highly inte8 cts, potatoes $1.99, and other things in proportion. Banks has been so much more stringent in preventing intercourse wtes that the little trade Butler permitted to his favorites Banks has stopped, and when be does grant a permit, a few miles oted. Certain parties here shipped goods upon a permit from Banks to Baton Rouge. As soon as they arrived there they were se declared they only recognized orders from Washington. Banks's first interview with Butler has not been noticed in any o as I had it from--;never mind who. Butler advanced towards Banks with his usual graceful empressement, and begged him, durinome to his house, as he had rooms already prepared for him. Banks replied he would remain at the St. Charles Hotel, as he did
s loyalty to our cause was questioned, wrote from his sick bed that affecting letter, in which he indignantly asked his accusers "how they could believe that his heart was otherwise than with us, when his life had been passed here, his children born here, and here was his property." So much for consistency and truth. Our winter has, for some of our population. I regret to say, been quite a gay one. Certain portions of them have been so far carried away by the attention of the French, English, and Spanish officers, that they have absolutely imitated the Northern fashion of lionizing them to their hearts' content, though, I fear, discontent of their purses. I absolutely blush to say it, but this winter king and queen parties have been much the rage. In these parties the king always pays the expenses. One or the other of the captains of the foreign ships has always been chosen king, and for that honor has paid all the expenses of an entertainment given at the house of some one
ars description — There sat the lady of the stolen mansion, her face very long and very doleful. His brilliant staff surrounded him, brilliant no longer. Alas, visions of detected rascality fixated before them — visions, they say, fully realized.--Clark, of the Butler Delta was there, resembling a punctured balloon, from which the gas was rapidly exhaling. French was there. He is now positively superceded, though it is not publicly announced. His brilliant financial arrangement with Bryant's gambling saloon — in which that house, besides its regular license fee — paid five hundred dollars per month to French, which was never accounted for. Of all Gen. Benjamin F. Butler's brilliant staff the only one whose hands are clear is Col. Stafford, who is really an honest man. He was compelled to take his present position for refusing to assist his political friends in stealing. Our streets are filled with a great quantity of crinoline, and to a stranger would look as usual, but
ound net. There was a case before the U. S. Provisional Court. Judge Peabody, of some interest. Lucien Adams, shortly after the advent of Butler, was arrested and imprisoned in one of the forts, where be has been ever since. His counsel, Col. Field, had made repeated, but unavailing efforts for a trial or admission to bail. The only crime which the accused had committed was merely the avowal, before the occupation of the city by Yankee, of a preference for the Southern Confederacy. Subsciatively their white "brethren." The principal speakers were T. J. Durant and Col. Fields. The former is described as speaking passionately. When did we who know him ever see that cold, unsympathetic nature kindled to passion? The voracious Col. Field enlightened the meeting as to the cause of the war, and amused his intelligent audience by holding up to their ridicule those whom he honored by the title of the leaders of this rebellion. This is the same Col. Fields who a few months ago, whe
$11, first quality beeves were selling at 25 cents per pound net. There was a case before the U. S. Provisional Court. Judge Peabody, of some interest. Lucien Adams, shortly after the advent of Butler, was arrested and imprisoned in one of the forts, where be has been ever since. His counsel, Col. Field, had made repeated, but unavailing efforts for a trial or admission to bail. The only crime which the accused had committed was merely the avowal, before the occupation of the city by Yankee, of a preference for the Southern Confederacy. Subsequently other charges, such as heading or promoting a conspiracy, &c., were trumped up, but no proof had been advanced. How the case terminated the report does not say, but judging from the seal of the prosecuting attorney, not, we imagine, to the benefit of the prisoner. From a New Orleans letter in the Grenada (Miss.) Appeal, we take the following gossip of interest: When Banks first came here with his great expedition, that
T. J. Durant (search for this): article 8
gnored every call of honor and duty and basely remained at home. That, as the brave were making sacrifices, the coward should be shown how the absent can be remembered. The Picayune describes the Union meeting of Saturday night as large and enthusiastic, but neglects to state the nature of the crowd. We who have no fear will state that it was composed of Yankees, Dutch and negroes, who applauded enthusiastically and appreciatively their white "brethren." The principal speakers were T. J. Durant and Col. Fields. The former is described as speaking passionately. When did we who know him ever see that cold, unsympathetic nature kindled to passion? The voracious Col. Field enlightened the meeting as to the cause of the war, and amused his intelligent audience by holding up to their ridicule those whom he honored by the title of the leaders of this rebellion. This is the same Col. Fields who a few months ago, when his loyalty to our cause was questioned, wrote from his sick bed t
From New Orleans. New Orleans papers as late as the 9th inst. have been received. There is not much in the New Orleans papers except extracts from the papers of New York. The editor of the See had taken a stroll in the second district, without seeing much that was cheerful in that once lively quarter.--"He missed," he says, "the flowers and the joyous sports of children, which used to make it so pleasant and attractive to the idle stroller." The Picayune man has found something and on the levee. He says: A walk on the leves, the grand quay, the grand reception, the great concentration, that was, of the citizens and inhabitants of nine-tenths of the commercial world, at this time presents to our old habitues food and aliment, as it were, for reflection and contrast. We who have for a quarter of a century or more, had the arrival of steam boats by the score, laden deep with the rich and varied productions of the Southwest, and the stapler of the great and teeming West, f
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