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Gen Pemberton (search for this): article 15
going into and coming out of Vicksburg On the 24th of May General Johnston dispatched Lamar Fontaine, the "hero upon crutches," with a verbal message to General Pemberton, in Vicksburg. He carried forty pounds of percussion caps, besides his blanket and crutches. The narrative of the dangerous adventure, published in the Mobksburg, and gave a loud buzzed for Jeff Davis and the Southern Confederacy, amid the vivas of our sailors, who gave him a joyful reception and assisted him to Gen. Pemberton's quarters. After resting a day and night in the city he started out with a dispatch from Gen Pemberton to Gen. Johnston. He embarked on his same canoe,Gen Pemberton to Gen. Johnston. He embarked on his same canoe, and soon reached the enemy's fleet below the city. He avoided their picket boats on both shares, and fleeted near their gunboats. He passed so near one of these that through an open porthole he could see men playing cards and hear them converse.--At Diamond Place he landed and bade adieu to his faithful "dug-out" After hobbling
Experience of a Scout going into and coming out of Vicksburg On the 24th of May General Johnston dispatched Lamar Fontaine, the "hero upon crutches," with a verbal message to General Pemberton, in Vicksburg. He carried forty pounds of percussion caps, besides his blanket and crutches. The narrative of the dangerous adventure, published in the Mobile Advertiser, is very interesting, and we give a portion of it: He crossed Big Black river that night, and the next day got between their lines and the division of their army which was at Mechanicsburg. He hid his horse in a ravine, and ensconced himself in a fallen tree, overlooking the road, during that day. From his hiding place he witnessed the retreat of the Yankees who passed him in considerable haste and confusion. After their columns had gone by, and the night had made it safe for him to move, he continued his route in the direction of Snyder's Bluff. As he entered the telegraphic road from Yazoo City to Vicksburg he
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