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ed and our entire army passed over. This plan was frustrated, according to report, by a counter movement which is explained in the following order of the Federal General Thomas. This order was found upon the person of Adj't Gen. Mubleman, of Gen. Palmer's staff, who subsequently fell into our hands. Headq'rs 14th Army Corps,Near McDaniel's House,Sept. 19, 1863--9 A. M. Major-General Palmer: The rebels are reported in quite heavy force between you and Alexander Mill. If you advanMajor-General Palmer: The rebels are reported in quite heavy force between you and Alexander Mill. If you advance as soon as possible on them in front, while I attack them in flank, I think we can use them up. Respectfully, your ob't serv't, Geo. H. Thomas, Major-Gen'l Jr. Commanding. This was Saturday morning. The counter attack upon the front and flank of our flanking column was made with vigor soon after it had crossed the river, and in accordance with the plan suggested by Gen. Thomas, and if not entirely successful, it was sufficiently so to disarrange our plans and delay our movements
John Ross (search for this): article 1
attle field lies on the west bank of West Chickamauga, and is about eight miles from Ringgold, Ga., and about the same distance from Chattanooga, Tenn., being nearly due west from the former and nearly due south from the latter. It is some four miles below the Tennessee line, and is bounded on the west by the Missionary Ridge, (a continuation of Walden's Ridge in Tennessee,) and on the east by the Chickamauga, or "river of blood," as the Indian name implies. Rossville, the former home of John Ross, the celebrated chief of the Cherokees, is two miles north from the battle field, and situated at the foot of a pass in Missionary Ridge. It was in this lovely valley of the Chickamauga, and along these mountain passes, that the hostile tribes were wont to meet in battle array and settle their disputes. It was here that the dusky maiden was wooed and won by her forest born lover, and questions of boundary and dominion and revenge found their bloody solution. This was in the years that a
ground is broken into hills and valleys, but the primeval forest still remains, and consequently the most skillful artillerist could accomplish, but little. It is said that Gen. Bragg's plan of attack was designed to be the same as that of Gen. Lee on the Chickahominy, viz: a movement down the left bank of the Chickamauga by a column which was to take the enemy in flank, and drive him down the river to the next ford or crossing below, where a second column was to cross over and unite with ga, and that the remainder of Rosecrans's army was still on the north side of the Tennessee, near Chattanooga, and that Burnside had not yet formed a junction with the main body. It such was his belief he was deceived, except as to Burnside, as Gen. Lee was at Gettysburg when he supposed, on the morning of the 2d of July, that the whole of Meade's forces had not then arrived. And yet it must be admitted that Gen. Bragg acted wisely in giving battle when and where he did. Delay was full of dang
September 19th, 1863 AD (search for this): article 1
s over and unite with the first in pushing the enemy still further down the river, until all the bridges and fords had been uncovered and our entire army passed over. This plan was frustrated, according to report, by a counter movement which is explained in the following order of the Federal General Thomas. This order was found upon the person of Adj't Gen. Mubleman, of Gen. Palmer's staff, who subsequently fell into our hands. Headq'rs 14th Army Corps,Near McDaniel's House,Sept. 19, 1863--9 A. M. Major-General Palmer: The rebels are reported in quite heavy force between you and Alexander Mill. If you advance as soon as possible on them in front, while I attack them in flank, I think we can use them up. Respectfully, your ob't serv't, Geo. H. Thomas, Major-Gen'l Jr. Commanding. This was Saturday morning. The counter attack upon the front and flank of our flanking column was made with vigor soon after it had crossed the river, and in accordance with the pl
September 25th, 1863 AD (search for this): article 1
Further from the battle of the Chickamauga. [from our Own Correspondent.] Army of Tennessee,In front of Chattanooga, Tenn.,September 25th, 1863. There are some additional facts and circumstances connected with the battle of the Chickamauga which deserve to be recorded. The battle field lies on the west bank of West Chickamauga, and is about eight miles from Ringgold, Ga., and about the same distance from Chattanooga, Tenn., being nearly due west from the former and nearly due south from the latter. It is some four miles below the Tennessee line, and is bounded on the west by the Missionary Ridge, (a continuation of Walden's Ridge in Tennessee,) and on the east by the Chickamauga, or "river of blood," as the Indian name implies. Rossville, the former home of John Ross, the celebrated chief of the Cherokees, is two miles north from the battle field, and situated at the foot of a pass in Missionary Ridge. It was in this lovely valley of the Chickamauga, and along these m
February, 7 AD (search for this): article 1
ements could get up? It is said — but with what truth I can not determine — that he acted under the belief that only three Federal corps had advanced up the valley of the Chickamauga, and that the remainder of Rosecrans's army was still on the north side of the Tennessee, near Chattanooga, and that Burnside had not yet formed a junction with the main body. It such was his belief he was deceived, except as to Burnside, as Gen. Lee was at Gettysburg when he supposed, on the morning of the 2d of July, that the whole of Meade's forces had not then arrived. And yet it must be admitted that Gen. Bragg acted wisely in giving battle when and where he did. Delay was full of danger; it might bring heavier reinforcements to his antagonist than any he could count upon. Moreover, Rosecrans was not on his guard, and did not look for an attack from an enemy who he supposed would be only too glad to effect his escape. At one time he was wary and active, combining the cunning of the fox with the
Benjamin Bragg (search for this): article 1
forest still remains, and consequently the most skillful artillerist could accomplish, but little. It is said that Gen. Bragg's plan of attack was designed to be the same as that of Gen. Lee on the Chickahominy, viz: a movement down the left banfficiently so to disarrange our plans and delay our movements. The inquiry may arise in the mind of the reader why Gen. Bragg did not postpone the attack until all his reinforcements could get up? It is said — but with what truth I can not detethe morning of the 2d of July, that the whole of Meade's forces had not then arrived. And yet it must be admitted that Gen. Bragg acted wisely in giving battle when and where he did. Delay was full of danger; it might bring heavier reinforcements tor springing upon its prey; but he had become intoxicated by success, and had grown proud and confident and incautious. Gen. Bragg did well, therefore, to strike his boastful foe as soon as he did. His blow was given with skill and crushing effect.
mn which was to take the enemy in flank, and drive him down the river to the next ford or crossing below, where a second column was to cross over and unite with the first in pushing the enemy still further down the river, until all the bridges and fords had been uncovered and our entire army passed over. This plan was frustrated, according to report, by a counter movement which is explained in the following order of the Federal General Thomas. This order was found upon the person of Adj't Gen. Mubleman, of Gen. Palmer's staff, who subsequently fell into our hands. Headq'rs 14th Army Corps,Near McDaniel's House,Sept. 19, 1863--9 A. M. Major-General Palmer: The rebels are reported in quite heavy force between you and Alexander Mill. If you advance as soon as possible on them in front, while I attack them in flank, I think we can use them up. Respectfully, your ob't serv't, Geo. H. Thomas, Major-Gen'l Jr. Commanding. This was Saturday morning. The counter at
Walden's Ridge (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 1
3. There are some additional facts and circumstances connected with the battle of the Chickamauga which deserve to be recorded. The battle field lies on the west bank of West Chickamauga, and is about eight miles from Ringgold, Ga., and about the same distance from Chattanooga, Tenn., being nearly due west from the former and nearly due south from the latter. It is some four miles below the Tennessee line, and is bounded on the west by the Missionary Ridge, (a continuation of Walden's Ridge in Tennessee,) and on the east by the Chickamauga, or "river of blood," as the Indian name implies. Rossville, the former home of John Ross, the celebrated chief of the Cherokees, is two miles north from the battle field, and situated at the foot of a pass in Missionary Ridge. It was in this lovely valley of the Chickamauga, and along these mountain passes, that the hostile tribes were wont to meet in battle array and settle their disputes. It was here that the dusky maiden was wooed
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 1
r losses at Vicksburg and Port Hudson. In the next, we took 40 stands of colors, 38 guns (of which Longstreet's command brought off 27,) 25,000 small arms, 150 wagons, and several thousand cartridge boxes, and knapsacks with their contents. This is a good showing--one that speaks for itself — and will pass for a great victory in any country. But this is not all; indeed, it is the least part of the glorious result. By a single battle we succeeded in expelling the invader from the soil of Georgia, the teeming Egypt of the Confederacy, at a time of much solicitude in the public mind, and under circumstances which seemed propitious to the successful advance of the enemy into the very heart and stronghold of the country. Our success can only be measured by what our grief and loss would have been if the enemy had reached Atlanta and overrun the State. I have endeavored heretofore to pay due homage to the skill and gallantry by which this great victory was achieved. Officers and m
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