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ns around Atlanta. An able correspondent in Hood's army, in his last letter to the Mobile Advertiser, gives what he was informed was General Hood's plan. This is interesting as a part of the histtainly bold and ambitious enough in its scope." Hood, it seems, was deceived by false information frI have been informed that the following was General Hood's plan of operations on the 30th of August, and here it is a mere creek, about knee deep. Hood sent, Hardee's corps, which was only twelve mily thousand men — an excess over the enemy. General Hood had entire confidence in the result, thinkid scatter it over a line of twenty-eight miles, Hood followed suit by dividing his own, with twenty this was his position; and it follows that General Hood was deceived by false information from his must have been about night on the 30th when General Hood was informed of Howard's movement upon Jone On the night of the 31st, when Hardee informed Hood that our assault upon the enemy at Jonesboro' h
was deceived by false information from his scouts, and the Yankees state as much on him. We copy from the correspondence as follows: I have been informed that the following was General Hood's plan of operations on the 30th of August, Yankee Howard's grand corps of eighteen thousand, made a forced march of sixteen miles from Fairburn, on the West Point road, to Jonesboro', on the Macon road. They arrived at Jonesboro' on the Macon road. They arrived at Jonesboro' on the evening of the 30th, crossed Flint river, and took position between the river and the town. This is the head of Flint river, and here it is a mere creek, about knee deep. Hood sent, Hardee's corps, which was only twelve miles from Jonesboro', and Lee's which was fifteen, to meet this movement. I do not know when Hardee moved, but presume that he moved during the day of the 30th. Lee never moved until ten that night, and did not straighten out and get fairly in motion until daylight. Some Yankees has struck
March, 8 AD (search for this): article 4
is interesting as a part of the history of the operations around Jackson and the evacuation of Atlanta. We have not seen if elsewhere from any other source.--As the correspondent says, "the plan was certainly bold and ambitious enough in its scope." Hood, it seems, was deceived by false information from his scouts, and the Yankees state as much on him. We copy from the correspondence as follows: I have been informed that the following was General Hood's plan of operations on the 30th of August, Yankee Howard's grand corps of eighteen thousand, made a forced march of sixteen miles from Fairburn, on the West Point road, to Jonesboro', on the Macon road. They arrived at Jonesboro' on the Macon road. They arrived at Jonesboro' on the evening of the 30th, crossed Flint river, and took position between the river and the town. This is the head of Flint river, and here it is a mere creek, about knee deep. Hood sent, Hardee's corps, which was only twelve miles from Jonesboro', and
rmy was between Jonesboro' and Rough and Ready, not over twelve miles from right to left. I believe this was his position; and it follows that General Hood was deceived by false information from his cavalry and scouts, And they must have been very tardy in conveying information of Howard's march from Fairburn to Jonesboro'. It must have been about night on the 30th when General Hood was informed of Howard's movement upon Jonesboro', and before night toward was there. On the night of the 31st, when Hardee informed Hood that our assault upon the enemy at Jonesboro' had failed, he was greatly astonished. He threw up his hands, it is said, exclaiming, "My God !" He had overestimated the courage of his army; and the mistake had been fatal, He fell into the opposite extreme of distrust, and ordered the evacuation of Atlanta, which he had not, until then, contemplated. He still had the Augusta railroad, which the enemy could not reach, and which would have enabled him to hold Atlanta.
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