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urrendered without resistance; and Wilson was informed by Howell Cobb, of the surrender of Lee to Grant, and the virtual ending of the war. Hostile operations were then, suspended, in accordance with an arrangement between Sherman and Johnston, which we shall consider presently. La Grange rejoined the main column soon after its arrival at Macon, but Croxton's brigade was still absent, and Wilson felt some uneasiness concerning its safety. All apprehensions were ended by its arrival on the 31st, April, 1865. after many adventures. We left Croxton not far from Tuscaloosa, in Alabama, on the 2d of April, outnumbered by Jackson, of Forrest's command. See page 516. From that point he moved rapidly to Johnson's Ferry, on the Black Warrior, fourteen miles above Tuscaloosa, where he crossed that stream, and sweeping down its western bank, surprised and captured April 5. the place he had been sent against from Elyton, together with three guns and about fifty prisoners. Then he destr
ge of the Department Redoubt and ditch at Mobile. this was the appearance of a portion of the inner line of works, in the suburbs of the city, near Dauphin Street, as it appeared when the writer sketched it in April, 1866. the picket fence indicates the line of Dauphin Street. The movable forces under Canby's command, had been organized into brigades, called the Reserve Corps of the Military Division of the West Mississippi, and numbered about ten thousand effective men. Early in January, 1865. these were concentrated at Kenner, ten miles above New Orleans, and General F. Steele See page 252. was assigned to take command of them. A part of this force was soon afterward sent to Fort Barrancas, in Pensacola Bay, and the remainder followed directly. These, with the addition of seven regiments, and several light batteries, were organized as the Thirteenth Army Corps, comprising three divisions, and General Gordon Granger was assigned to its command. Meanwhile, the Sixtee
ons, and General Gordon Granger was assigned to its command. Meanwhile, the Sixteenth Army Corps (General A. J. Smith), which had assisted in driving Hood out of Tennessee, was ordered to join Canby. It was then cantoned at Eastport. Early in February, it went in transports, accompanied by Knipe's division of cavalry, five thousand strong, by the waters of the Tennessee, Ohio, and Mississippi rivers, to New Orleans, where it arrived on the 21st, February. after a travel of over thirteen hundFebruary. after a travel of over thirteen hundred miles in the space of eleven days. There the corps remained awhile, waiting for the perfection of the arrangements for the expedition under Wilson, The Twenty-ninth and Thirty-third Iowa, Fiftieth Indiana, Twenty-seventh, Twenty-eighth and Thirty-fifth Wisconsin, and Seventy-seventh Ohio. which was to sweep down from the north, through Alabama, simultaneously with Canby's attack on Mobile. The corps finally moved again, and arrived at Fort Gaines, on Dauphin Island, on the 7th of March,
he 7th of March, where a siege train was organized, *consisting of seven batteries of the First Indiana Artillery, two of the Sixth Michigan, and one of Mack's Eighteenth New York. The cavalry marched overland from New Orleans. At the middle of March, every thing was in readiness for an attack on Mobile, with from twenty-five thousand to thirty thousand troops, composed of the Thirteenth and Sixteenth Corps, Knipe's cavalry division, and a brigade of cavalry, a division of infantry, and anothsion of the Mississippi, numbering about twenty-two thousand men and horses, were encamped on the north side of the Tennessee River, at Gravelly Springs and Waterloo, in Lauderdale County, Alabama. These had been thoroughly disciplined, when, in March, 1865. they were prepared for an expedition into Alabama, having for its object co-operation with Canby in the reduction of Mobile, and the capture of important places, particularly Selma, on the Alabama River, where the Confederates had extensi
een hundred miles in the space of eleven days. There the corps remained awhile, waiting for the perfection of the arrangements for the expedition under Wilson, The Twenty-ninth and Thirty-third Iowa, Fiftieth Indiana, Twenty-seventh, Twenty-eighth and Thirty-fifth Wisconsin, and Seventy-seventh Ohio. which was to sweep down from the north, through Alabama, simultaneously with Canby's attack on Mobile. The corps finally moved again, and arrived at Fort Gaines, on Dauphin Island, on the 7th of March, where a siege train was organized, *consisting of seven batteries of the First Indiana Artillery, two of the Sixth Michigan, and one of Mack's Eighteenth New York. The cavalry marched overland from New Orleans. At the middle of March, every thing was in readiness for an attack on Mobile, with from twenty-five thousand to thirty thousand troops, composed of the Thirteenth and Sixteenth Corps, Knipe's cavalry division, and a brigade of cavalry, a division of infantry, and another of negr
March 22nd (search for this): chapter 19
an expedition into Alabama, having for its object co-operation with Canby in the reduction of Mobile, and the capture of important places, particularly Selma, on the Alabama River, where the Confederates had extensive iron founderies. The march of Cheatham toward the Carolinas, with a part of Hood's broken army, and the employment of the remainder at Mobile, made nearly the whole of Thomas's force in Tennessee, disposable, and Wilson left Chickasaw Landing, on the Tennessee River, on the 22d of March, with about thirteen thousand men, composing the divisions of Long, Upton and McCook. Knipe's division, we have seen, went with the Sixteenth Army Corps to New Orleans. Hatch's division was left at Eastport. He had six batteries. His men were all mounted excepting fifteen hundred, who were detailed as an escort to the supply and baggage trains of two hundred and fifty wagons. There was also a light pontoon train of thirty boats, carried by fifty six-mule wagons. Each man was well p
March 25th (search for this): chapter 19
e belief that Canby's real objective was Montgomery, and not Mobile. He encountered very little opposition, excepting from squads of Confederate cavalry. These fell back before him, until he reached Pringle's Creek, where he had a sharp fight March 25. with about eight hundred Alabama cavalry, under General Clanton. These were routed by a charge, with a loss of about two hundred of their number killed and wounded, and two hundred and seventy-five made prisoners. Among the latter was their leader. Steele found very little opposition after that until he reached the front of Blakely, April 1. where he received supplies from General Canby, sent in seventy-five wagons in charge of General J. C. Veatch. On the 25th of March, the. Thirteenth and Sixteenth Corps advanced from Fish River, on Mobile, up the east side of the bay, along the Belle, Rose and Blakely roads, which were made perilous by torpedoes, that killed several men and horses. They met with skirmishers only, and on th
March 27th (search for this): chapter 19
Veatch. On the 25th of March, the. Thirteenth and Sixteenth Corps advanced from Fish River, on Mobile, up the east side of the bay, along the Belle, Rose and Blakely roads, which were made perilous by torpedoes, that killed several men and horses. They met with skirmishers only, and on the next day were in the neighborhood of Spanish Fort, seven miles due east from Mobile. Canby perceived the necessity of reducing this work before passing on to Blakely; and, on the following morning, March 27. before ten o'clock, it was completely invested, on the land side. The divisions of Carr and McArthur, of the Sixteenth Corps, were, at first, on the right, the extreme of the former resting on Bayou Minette, and Benton's division of the Thirteenth Corps, was on the left, its extreme touching at Belle Rose. The remainder of the Sixteenth Corps seriously threatened Blakeley. Steele came up a few days afterward and joined that corps, and his troops then formed the extreme right in front of
March 30th (search for this): chapter 19
bile and Montgomery, but Wilson was keeping him too thoroughly occupied in the interior to allow him to leave. The garrison displayed great courage and resolution. It made at least a dozen sorties during the siege. One of them, made on the 30th of March, was a brilliant success. At sunset the bombardment had ceased, when a party of the garrison, under Captain Watson, concealed by the smoke. rushed out over their works and captured Captain Stearns, of the Seventh Vermont, with twenty men, wmotion, to meet the danger. He sent Chalmers by way of Bridgeville toward Tuscaloosa. Hearing of this, March 27, 1865. Wilson put his forces in rapid motion, with ample supplies, for Montevallo, beyond the Cahawba River. Arriving at Elyton, March 30. he directed McCook to send Croxton's brigade to Tuscaloosa for the purpose of burning the public property and destroying founderies and factories there. The adventures of that brigade, which did not rejoin the main body until the expedition ha
March 31st (search for this): chapter 19
was driven across the Cahawba to Montevallo, as sharply pursued as felled trees, which the fugitives left behind them, would allow. Upton passed the Cahawba with his whole division, pushed on to Montevallo, and in that region destroyed the large Red Mountain, Central, Bibb, and Columbiana Iron-works, the Cahawba Rolling-mills, and five important collieries. These were all in operation, and were a serious loss to the Confederates. Wilson arrived at Montevallo on the afternoon of the 31st of March. Upton was just ready to move forward. Just then the Confederates made their appearance on the Selma road, driving in Upton's pickets. These consisted of the commands of Roddy and Crossland. After a sharp fight with Alexander's brigade, they were routed by a charge of the Fifth Iowa Cavalry, and driven in confusion toward Randolph. They attempted to make a stand at Six-mile Creek, south of Montevallo, but were again routed with a loss of fifty men made prisoners. Upton bivouacked f
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