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November 8th (search for this): chapter 9
he Fredericksburg campaign affairs in North Carolina supplies for troops brought by the advance engagements in North Carolina battle near Goldsboro North Carolina troops in the Western army battles of Murfreesboro and Stone river. The last great battle of 1862 was fought on the hills around Fredericksburg. There, seeing the design of the Federal commander, General Lee concentrated his army to await attack. General McClellan had been displaced by the Federal authorities on the 8th of November, and General Burnside appointed to succeed him as commander in the field. The new leader, yielding to public pressure for some success before the year closed, prepared to attack Lee in his chosen position. Burnside had organized his army into three grand divisions, under Sumner, Hooker and Franklin. The first weeks in December, these grand divisions were stretched along the northern bank of the Rappahannock, and were searching for ways to cross over for an attack. On the southern si
design of the Federal commander, General Lee concentrated his army to await attack. General McClellan had been displaced by the Federal authorities on the 8th of November, and General Burnside appointed to succeed him as commander in the field. The new leader, yielding to public pressure for some success before the year closed, prepared to attack Lee in his chosen position. Burnside had organized his army into three grand divisions, under Sumner, Hooker and Franklin. The first weeks in December, these grand divisions were stretched along the northern bank of the Rappahannock, and were searching for ways to cross over for an attack. On the southern side of the river, Lee's army was posted on the hills and ridges just back of Fredericksburg. His line extended parallel to the river, and stretched from a point just across from Falmouth to Hamilton's crossing, a distance of about three miles. His left was under Longstreet, and his right under Jackson. R. H. Anderson's division forme
December 10th (search for this): chapter 9
tle creek and at Rawls' mill, spirited resistance to his advance was offered by the Confederates, and Foster lost 6 killed and 8 wounded. The Confederates, however, were not in force enough to do more than retard Foster's movements. Captain Newkirk, of the cavalry, and Captain Adams, commanding a section of artillery, attacked and destroyed the gunboat Ellis on the New river. According to General Whiting's report, this affair was very creditable to the officers and men engaged. On December 10th, Lieut.-Col. John C. Lamb, with some companies from the Seventeenth regiment, a squadron of cavalry under Colonel Evans, and Moore's battery, captured for a time the town of Plymouth, N. C. Colonel Galloway gives the following account of the adventure: The plan was to capture the pickets and take the place by surprise. We reached the picket station just before day, captured all but one, who escaped, firing his musket as he ran. This gave notice of our approach, and when we reached Plym
December 31st (search for this): chapter 9
says Major Stringfield, were furious at his death, and before they could be restrained, scalped several of the Federal wounded and dead, for which ample apology was made at the time. Regimental History. In General Bragg's battles at Murfreesboro and Stone's river, North Carolina had engaged these regiments: Twenty-ninth, Thirty-ninth and Sixtieth Col. R. B. Vance, after the death of Gen. J. E. Rains, commanded the Second brigade of Stevenson's division. At Murfreesboro, on the 31st of December, the Twenty-ninth was under fire for over five hours, captured one piece of artillery, and engaged in a gallant charge upon a brigade posted in a cedar thicket. General McCown, the division commander, said of its colonel: Colonel Vance bore himself gallantly. The Thirty-ninth was temporarily serving in Gen. Patton Anderson's brigade. General Anderson thus mentions it in his report: The adjutant of the Thirty-ninth North Carolina, Lieut. I. S. Hyams, reported to me on the battlefield
-sixth, Col. P. F. Faison; the Fifty-seventh, Col. A. C. Godwin; the Fifty-eighth, Col. J. B. Palmer; the Fifty-ninth (cavalry), Col. D. D. Ferrebee; the Sixteenth, Col. W. M. Hardy; the Sixty-first, Col. J. D. Radcliffe; the Sixty-second, Col. R. G. A. Love; the Sixty-third (cavalry), Col. J. H. McNeil; and the Sixty-fourth, Col. L. M. Allen, were all organized during this time. Major Gordon, in his article on the Organization of the North Carolina Troops, states: When the legislature, in 1861, directed General Martin to furnish clothing for the North Carolina troops, there were then only about thirty regiments in service. In less than a year that number was more than doubled, and it became very plain to General Martin that the .resources of the State were not adequate to the demands of the army. In August, 1862, he laid the matter before Governor Clark, and asked permission to buy supplies abroad, also a ship to transport them. The governor's term of service being near an end,
campaign affairs in North Carolina supplies for troops brought by the advance engagements in North Carolina battle near Goldsboro North Carolina troops in the Western army battles of Murfreesboro and Stone river. The last great battle of 1862 was fought on the hills around Fredericksburg. There, seeing the design of the Federal commander, General Lee concentrated his army to await attack. General McClellan had been displaced by the Federal authorities on the 8th of November, and Gene got a great deal of credit forth is; General Martin, who was the real author of it, practically none. From this time forward it is certain that the North Carolina troops were better clothed than those of any other State. In July of this year (1862), Lieut. A. B. Andrews, commanding 41 men of the First North Carolina cavalry, attacked three gunboats at Rainbow banks, near Williamston. His men fired upon the boats from the banks until the shells from the boats made it impossible to continue
August, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 9
rth, Col. L. M. Allen, were all organized during this time. Major Gordon, in his article on the Organization of the North Carolina Troops, states: When the legislature, in 1861, directed General Martin to furnish clothing for the North Carolina troops, there were then only about thirty regiments in service. In less than a year that number was more than doubled, and it became very plain to General Martin that the .resources of the State were not adequate to the demands of the army. In August, 1862, he laid the matter before Governor Clark, and asked permission to buy supplies abroad, also a ship to transport them. The governor's term of service being near an end, he declined to give any order, .and requested that the matter lie over till Governor Vance was inaugurated. Soon after Governor Vance's inauguration, General Martin brought the matter to his attention. The governor took it under advisement for a few days. Soon his attention was called to the subject again, and he reque
J. T. Adams (search for this): chapter 9
al Peck reported his force as having inflicted a loss of from 75 to 200, the Confederate casualties were 2 wounded. General Foster with 5,oco men left Washington, N. C., for Williamston, on the 2d of November. At Little creek and at Rawls' mill, spirited resistance to his advance was offered by the Confederates, and Foster lost 6 killed and 8 wounded. The Confederates, however, were not in force enough to do more than retard Foster's movements. Captain Newkirk, of the cavalry, and Captain Adams, commanding a section of artillery, attacked and destroyed the gunboat Ellis on the New river. According to General Whiting's report, this affair was very creditable to the officers and men engaged. On December 10th, Lieut.-Col. John C. Lamb, with some companies from the Seventeenth regiment, a squadron of cavalry under Colonel Evans, and Moore's battery, captured for a time the town of Plymouth, N. C. Colonel Galloway gives the following account of the adventure: The plan was to cap
L. M. Allen (search for this): chapter 9
. J. B. Palmer; the Fifty-ninth (cavalry), Col. D. D. Ferrebee; the Sixteenth, Col. W. M. Hardy; the Sixty-first, Col. J. D. Radcliffe; the Sixty-second, Col. R. G. A. Love; the Sixty-third (cavalry), Col. J. H. McNeil; and the Sixty-fourth, Col. L. M. Allen, were all organized during this time. Major Gordon, in his article on the Organization of the North Carolina Troops, states: When the legislature, in 1861, directed General Martin to furnish clothing for the North Carolina troops, there ws mentioned above, North Carolina was represented in the Western army by the following regiments: Twenty-ninth, Col. R. B. Vance; Thirty-ninth, Col. D. Coleman; Fifty-eighth, Col. J. B. Palmer; Sixty-second, Col. R. G. A. Love; Sixty-fourth, Col. L. M. Allen; Sixty-ninth (Thomas' legion), Col. W. H. Thomas; Fifth cavalry battalion, Maj. A. H. Baird; Seventh cavalry battalion, Lieut.-Col. G. N. Folk, and Lieutenant-Colonel Walker's cavalry battalion. In September the Sixty-ninth regiment (Thom
W. A. Allen (search for this): chapter 9
rganized in North Carolina, and while known as the First North Carolina had fought the battle at Bethel. General Robertson reported his loss at 10 killed, 42 wounded. The Federal loss was 8 killed and 73 wounded. After this brush with Robertson, Foster moved on toward Goldsboro, his main object being to burn the railroad bridge there. At and near the bridge were stationed General Clingman, with the Eighth, Fifty-first and Fifty-second North Carolina regiments, under Cols. H. M. Shaw, W. A. Allen and J. K. Marshall; Companies B, G and H, Tenth artillery, acting as infantry, and Company F, Fortieth artillery, acting as infantry, under Lieut.-Col. S. D. Pool; and Starr's battery. Other troops were in the vicinity, but for reasons not now apparent, were not moved to the bridge in time to assist the men engaged. The Sixty-first regiment, Lieutenant-Colonel Devane, arrived on the field during the engagement and reported to its brigadier, General Clingman, in time to take part in the
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