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m that day the new comers never ceased to admire the greatness of the trees. On the sixth, John Colman and four others, in a boat, sounded the Narrows, and passed through Kill van Kull to Newark bay. The air was very sweet, and the land as pleasant with grass and flowers and trees, as they had ever seen; but on the return, the boat was attacked by two canoes and Colman killed by an arrow. On Wednesday, the ninth, Hudson moved cautiously from the lower bay into the Narrows, and on the eleventh, by aid of a very light wind, he went into the great river of the north, and rode all night in a harbor, which was safe against every wind. On the morning of the twelfth, the natives, in eight and twenty canoes, crowded about him, bringing beans and very good oysters. The day was fair and warm, though the light wind was from the north; and as Hudson, under the brightest autumnal sun, gazed around, having behind him the Narrows opening to the ocean, before him the noble stream Chap. XV.}
h Kill van Kull to Newark bay. The air was very sweet, and the land as pleasant with grass and flowers and trees, as they had ever seen; but on the return, the boat was attacked by two canoes and Colman killed by an arrow. On Wednesday, the ninth, Hudson moved cautiously from the lower bay into the Narrows, and on the eleventh, by aid of a very light wind, he went into the great river of the north, and rode all night in a harbor, which was safe against every wind. On the morning of the twelfth, the natives, in eight and twenty canoes, crowded about him, bringing beans and very good oysters. The day was fair and warm, though the light wind was from the north; and as Hudson, under the brightest autumnal sun, gazed around, having behind him the Narrows opening to the ocean, before him the noble stream Chap. XV.} 1609. flowing from above Weehawken with a broad, deep channel between forest-crowned palisades and the gently swelling banks of Manhattan, he made a record that it was as
er the brightest autumnal sun, gazed around, having behind him the Narrows opening to the ocean, before him the noble stream Chap. XV.} 1609. flowing from above Weehawken with a broad, deep channel between forest-crowned palisades and the gently swelling banks of Manhattan, he made a record that it was as fair a land as can be trodden by the foot of man. That night he anchored just above Manhattanville. The flood-tide of the next morning and of evening brought him near Yonkers. On the fourteenth a strong south-east wind wafted him rapidly into the Highlands. At daybreak, on the fifteenth, mists hung over the landscape, but as they rose, the sun revealed the neighborhood of West Point. With a south wind the Half Moon soon emerged from the mountains that rise near the water's edge; sweeping upwards, it passed the elbow at Hyde Park, and at night anchored a little below Red Hook, within the shadow of the majestic Catskill range, which it was noticed stands at a distance from the
before him the noble stream Chap. XV.} 1609. flowing from above Weehawken with a broad, deep channel between forest-crowned palisades and the gently swelling banks of Manhattan, he made a record that it was as fair a land as can be trodden by the foot of man. That night he anchored just above Manhattanville. The flood-tide of the next morning and of evening brought him near Yonkers. On the fourteenth a strong south-east wind wafted him rapidly into the Highlands. At daybreak, on the fifteenth, mists hung over the landscape, but as they rose, the sun revealed the neighborhood of West Point. With a south wind the Half Moon soon emerged from the mountains that rise near the water's edge; sweeping upwards, it passed the elbow at Hyde Park, and at night anchored a little below Red Hook, within the shadow of the majestic Catskill range, which it was noticed stands at a distance from the river. Trafficking with the natives, who were very loving, taking in fresh water, grounding at
led the neighborhood of West Point. With a south wind the Half Moon soon emerged from the mountains that rise near the water's edge; sweeping upwards, it passed the elbow at Hyde Park, and at night anchored a little below Red Hook, within the shadow of the majestic Catskill range, which it was noticed stands at a distance from the river. Trafficking with the natives, who were very loving, taking in fresh water, grounding at low tide on a shoal, the Netherlanders, on the evening of the seventeenth, reached no higher than the latitude of about 42°, 18′, just above the present city of Hudson. The next day Hudson went on shore in one of the boats of the natives with an aged chief of a small tribe of the River Indians. He was taken to a house well constructed of oak bark, circular in shape, and arched in the roof, the granary of the beans and maize of the last year's harvest; while outside enough of them lay drying to load three ships. Two mats were spread out as seats for the stran
r the people a share in legislation. The duke of York temporized. The provincial revenue had expired; the ablest lawyers in England questioned his right to renew it; the province opposed its collection with a Chap. XVII.} 1683. spirit that required compliance, and in January, 1683, the newly appointed governor Thomas Dongan, a Roman Catholic, was instructed to call a general assembly of all the freeholders, by the persons whom they should choose to represent them. Accordingly, on the seventeenth of the following October, about seventy years after Manhattan was first occupied, about thirty years after the demand of the popular convention by the Dutch, the people of New York met in assembly, and by their first act, claimed the rights of Englishmen. Supreme legislative power —such was their further declaration—shall forever be and reside in the governor, council, and people, met in general assembly. Every freeholder and freeman shall vote, for representation without restraint. No
and fields of ice near Nova Zembla closed against him the straits of Vaigatz. Remembering the late accounts from Virginia, Hudson, with prompt decision, turned to the west, to look for some opening north of the Chesapeake. On the thirtieth of May he took in water at the Faro isles, and in Chap. XV.} 1609. was on the track of Frobisher. Early in July, with foremast carried away and canvas rent in a gale, he found himself among fishermen from France on the Banks of Newfoundland. On the eighteenth he entered a very good harbor on the coast of Maine, mended his sails, and refitted his ship with a foremast from the woods. On the fourth of August, a boat was sent on shore at the headland which Gosnold seven years before had called Cape Cod, and which was now named New Holland; and on the eighteenth of August, the Half Moon rode at sea off the Chesapeake Bay, which was known to be the entrance to the river of King James in Virginia. Here Hudson changed his course. On the twenty-eight
suppressed; and the preachers had already matured the evil design of a revolution. For the events that Lambeth Mss. 1025 followed were not a violent passion of the rabble, but a long-contrived piece of wickedness. There is a general buzzing among the people, April 16. great with expectation of their old charter, or they know not what; such was the ominous message of Andros to Brockholt, with orders that the soldiers should be ready for action. About nine o'clock of the morning of the 18th, just as April 18. George, the commander of the Rose frigate, stepped on shore, Green and the Boston ship-carpenters gathered about him, and made him a prisoner. The town took the alarm. The royalist sheriff endeavored to quiet the Chap XVII.} 1689 multitude; and at once the multitude arrested him. They next hastened to the major of the regiment, and demanded colors and drums. He resisted; they threatened. The crowd increased; companies form under Nelson, Foster, Waterhouse, their old
ns; a fat dog, too, Chap. XV.} 1609. was killed; and haste made to prepare a feast When Hudson refused to wait, they supposed him to be afraid of their weapons; and taking their arrows, they broke them in pieces and threw them into the fire. The country was pleasant and fruitful, bearing wild grapes. Of all lands on which I ever set my foot, says Hudson, this is the best for tillage. The River Indians, for more than a century, preserved the memory of his visit. The Half Moon, on the nineteenth, drew near the landing of Kinderhook, where the Indians brought on board skins of beaver and otter. Hudson ventured no higher with the yacht; an exploring boat ascended a little above Albany to where the river was but seven feet deep, and the soundings grew uncertain. So, on the twenty-third, Hudson turned his prow towards Holland, leaving the friendly tribes persuaded that the Dutch would revisit them the next year. As he went down the river, imagination peopled the region with towns
grapes. Of all lands on which I ever set my foot, says Hudson, this is the best for tillage. The River Indians, for more than a century, preserved the memory of his visit. The Half Moon, on the nineteenth, drew near the landing of Kinderhook, where the Indians brought on board skins of beaver and otter. Hudson ventured no higher with the yacht; an exploring boat ascended a little above Albany to where the river was but seven feet deep, and the soundings grew uncertain. So, on the twenty-third, Hudson turned his prow towards Holland, leaving the friendly tribes persuaded that the Dutch would revisit them the next year. As he went down the river, imagination peopled the region with towns. A party which, somewhere in Ulster county, went to walk on the west bank, found an excellent soil, with large trees of oak and walnut and chesnut. The land near Newburgh seemed a very pleasant site for a city. On the first of October Hudson passed below the mountains. On the fourth, not wi
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