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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: March 29, 1861., [Electronic resource].

Found 1,475 total hits in 699 results.

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Seasonable Opposition. --Col. Colt, of Hartford, Ct., has an extensive green-house, in which January does business in successful competition with the summer months. In that green-house strawberries are flourishing at the present writing. The Times says that cucumbers are now plentifully produced, and bring, for the long variety, (from English seed) fifty to seventy-five cents each. Peaches are now as large as walnuts, and grapes as large as rifle bullets. Figs are far advanced; pine-apples ripe; apricots, plums, beans, &c., &c., are a sight to behold; while roses and rare flowers of every variety are in bloom. --Last March the manager sold $500 worth of cucumbers; this month he can sell $1,000 worth of that article. The grapes alone, in the hot and cold graperies, can produce Col. Colt a profit of $5,000 when fairly under way.
January 8th (search for this): article 1
$25 reward. --Ranaway from my farm, Long Row, Hanover county, about the 8th of January, a Negro man, named Peter Brown, about 21 years old, of a dark brown color, with a scar on one side of his neck; also a small one on his knee; very long-legged, and upwards of six feet high. The above reward will be paid, if delivered to me, or secured in jail. Wm. J. Carpenter. mh 20--1m
Eton Etiquette. --The March number of the Cornhill Magazine opens with a satirical paper upon education at aristocratic Eton.--One passage records what seems a very mean transaction on the part of a head-master of a great public school, whose legitimate emoluments, from his pupils, are probably equal to some $25,000 a year. It seems that when an Eton boy is about to quit the school he usually "takes leave" of his tutor and of the headmaster. He waits on the head master, who expresses his sorrow at parting with him, his wishes for his future welfare, and sends his best compliments to his parents; the two then shake hands and the boy retires. As he eaves the room, a small table meets his eyes, on which is a plate with several bank notes displayed upon it. On this plate the boy deposits a note, varying from £10 to £25. It is said that the sons of dukes and railway kings go as high as £50
Seasonable Opposition. --Col. Colt, of Hartford, Ct., has an extensive green-house, in which January does business in successful competition with the summer months. In that green-house strawberries are flourishing at the present writing. The Times says that cucumbers are now plentifully produced, and bring, for the long variety, (from English seed) fifty to seventy-five cents each. Peaches are now as large as walnuts, and grapes as large as rifle bullets. Figs are far advanced; pine-apples ripe; apricots, plums, beans, &c., &c., are a sight to behold; while roses and rare flowers of every variety are in bloom. --Last March the manager sold $500 worth of cucumbers; this month he can sell $1,000 worth of that article. The grapes alone, in the hot and cold graperies, can produce Col. Colt a profit of $5,000 when fairly under way.
March 13th (search for this): article 1
English policy, which had proved victorious in Italy. One member warned the Government against the suicidal policy, and predicted internal danger ahead. All was quiet at Warsaw. Russian troops continued to arrive. The Conference on the Syrian question was being held. It was expected an agreement would soon be decided upon. Dispatches were received announcing that the Mussulman of Syria were assuming a threatening attitude towards the Christians. Turkish Government drafts on Mires, for 400,000 piastres, were duly paid on the 20th. Differences had occurred between Sir Ed. Bulwer and the American Minister. Sir E. B. declined to attend the reception of the latter on Washington's birth-day. Commercial. Liverpool, March 13. -- Cotton --Sales for four days of 33,000 bales, including 10,500 for speculation and export. The market closed firm, with an upward tendency. Breadstuffs firm and steady. Provisions quiet. Console 91 ¾@91 ⅞, for money.
March 26th (search for this): article 2
Hampton Roads. March 28th. Arrived, barks Glenwood, 35 days from Rio, with coffee; Tallulah, 42 days from Liverpool, with coal; Fanny Crenshaw, from Rio, for Bremen; brig Jason, from Trinidad; ship Rapid, 100 days from Kent's Island; schr. R. H. Pellen, 12 days from Matanzas. Norfolk, March 28.-- Arr'd, ship Russia, from Scotland, with coal. New York, March 26.--Arrived, schr. Ida Libby, (of Richmond, Va.,) Savannah. Baltimore, March 27.-- Cl'd, schr. R. C. Stanard, Richmond. Alexandria, March 27.--Sailed, schr. Samuel B. Grice, Norfolk.
March 26th (search for this): article 4
From Texas. Galveston, March 26. --The Convention elected Ford Colonel, and Bavlor Lieutenant Colonel, of the regiment of Rangers, to serve 12 months on the frontiers. On the 21st Messrs. Houston and Hamilton delivered speeches at Austin, denouncing the Convention, &c. On the 23d the Convention, in Committee of the Whole, adopted the Confederate Constitution almost unanimously. On engrossing, the vote was also nearly unanimous.
March 27th (search for this): article 2
Rio, with coffee; Tallulah, 42 days from Liverpool, with coal; Fanny Crenshaw, from Rio, for Bremen; brig Jason, from Trinidad; ship Rapid, 100 days from Kent's Island; schr. R. H. Pellen, 12 days from Matanzas. Norfolk, March 28.-- Arr'd, ship Russia, from Scotland, with coal. New York, March 26.--Arrived, schr. Ida Libby, (of Richmond, Va.,) Savannah. Baltimore, March 27.-- Cl'd, schr. R. C. Stanard, Richmond. Alexandria, March 27.--Sailed, schr. Samuel B. Grice, Norfolk. Rio, with coffee; Tallulah, 42 days from Liverpool, with coal; Fanny Crenshaw, from Rio, for Bremen; brig Jason, from Trinidad; ship Rapid, 100 days from Kent's Island; schr. R. H. Pellen, 12 days from Matanzas. Norfolk, March 28.-- Arr'd, ship Russia, from Scotland, with coal. New York, March 26.--Arrived, schr. Ida Libby, (of Richmond, Va.,) Savannah. Baltimore, March 27.-- Cl'd, schr. R. C. Stanard, Richmond. Alexandria, March 27.--Sailed, schr. Samuel B. Grice, Norfolk.
March 27th (search for this): article 5
Railroad Casualty. Utica, N. Y., March 27. --Wm. Anderson, of the firm of Anderson & Sons, of Hawkinsville, was instantly killed this morning at Holland Patent, in attempting to get on the car of the Black River Railroad while the train was in motion.
March 27th (search for this): article 6
An oil well Explosion--one man killed, Another wounded. Sarnia, C. W., March 27. --Yesterday, while two men were drilling an oil well near this place, the gas exploded, killing one man named Hiram Cook, and dangerously injuring the other.
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