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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: April 3, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Fauquier (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 2
ground of her avowed policy of free trade; yet he was so firmly attached by every consideration to the Gulf States, that he would be unwilling, under any fair circumstances, to turn his back upon them. He was in favor of a further and final effort to reconstruct the Union; and whoever should have the good fortune to so shape the course of events as to bring about a peaceful solution of the great questions at issue, would be entitled to the lasting gratitude of posterity. Mr. Scott, of Fauquier, said he understood the time had nearly arrived at which the Committee usually rose. He desired to give some views upon a subject so engrossing as the question under debate, but was reluctant to farther exhaust the patience of the Committee at this time. He therefore moved that the Committee rise. The motion was agreed to, and the Committee rose and reported progress. In Convention. Mr. Early, of Franklin, presented a substitute, which he proposed to offer, for the report of
Middlesex Village (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): article 2
e no dishonor in saying to the North, we must have these guarantees, or disunion is the inevitable result. It may be said that this has already been done; but he apprehended it had not been done in the form and with the authority here proposed. He argued that the Federal Government ought, and might now with propriety acknowledge the independence of the Confederated States, and that it was an indispensable step towards a settlement of the difficulty. He agreed with the gentleman from Middlesex, that the condition of the Confederated States was not to be disturbed by force. He held that the Committee ought to agree upon something that would speedily settle the pending difficulty, taking care to demand enough to meet the exigencies of the case.--He spoke highly of the resources of the Southern Confederacy, and the gallantry of her people, but must be permitted to say that he thought she acted with rather too much haste in going off without consulting with her Southern sisters. H
West Virginia (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 2
would sting him with a sting so deep that all the stings of Yankeedom could not compare with it in bitterness. It would be the sting which a brother might give to a brother — the sting of ingratitude; and if the war came between them, it would be more hostile than all the wars that hell itself could engender. Mr. Summers, of Kanawha, said he was sure the gentleman from Princess Anne did not need his testimony in regard to the gallant and patriotic service which he rendered, not to Western Virginia alone, but to all the Commonwealth, in the Convention of 1850-'51.--He proceeded to make some slight correction in the history of that Convention, which Mr. Wise accepted. Mr. Summers said he did not despair of the Republic then, nor did he despair of it now. Mr. Early trusted the Convention would pardon him for making a few remarks. Mr. Stuart, of Doddridge, claimed the floor. He was willing to have the vote taken now, if there was to be no more discussion of the subject; b
a manner that there should be no possibility of misunderstanding his position as a Union man, here or hereafter. He moved that it be printed. Agreed to. Mr. Wise inquired what had become of the question of taxation, which had been heretofore under consideration? The President said it was now properly before the Convention, and the gentleman from Doddridge (Mr. Stuart) was entitled to the floor. Mr. Wise desired to avail himself of the opportunity to correct a misrepresentation under which many persons now labored, in regard to his position on the question in the Convention of 1850-'51. It was charged that he was the author of the clauseVirginia alone, but to all the Commonwealth, in the Convention of 1850-'51.--He proceeded to make some slight correction in the history of that Convention, which Mr. Wise accepted. Mr. Summers said he did not despair of the Republic then, nor did he despair of it now. Mr. Early trusted the Convention would pardon him for mak
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