hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 40 0 Browse Search
Ellsworth 34 22 Browse Search
Abe Lincoln 28 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis 23 1 Browse Search
Massa Greeley 21 1 Browse Search
Santa Fe (Colombia) 18 0 Browse Search
John Letcher 17 1 Browse Search
James O. Davis 14 0 Browse Search
Cairo, Ill. (Illinois, United States) 14 0 Browse Search
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) 12 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: may 30, 1861., [Electronic resource].

Found 1,024 total hits in 480 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ...
Apprehended insubordination among the Federal troops. --A dispatch from Philadelphia, May 23, to the New York Herald, says: Recent exposures, made by the independent portion of the press of this city, regarding the evident peculations in the army supplies of this State, by contractors and those in power, have led to an investigation by the United States Grand Jury. Two blankets were taken before them to-day, on a flimsy article, weighing one pound six ounces, the same as has generally been supplied to the Pennsylvania troops at the cost $3.60. The other was a Massachusetts troop blanket, thick, warm and closely woven, weighing seven pounds. So shameful has been the treatment of many of the three months volunteers that most of them will certainly return home as soon as their terms expire, unless the State authorities show a better disposition to protect them from speculators, and fears are entertained of their demoralization. This state of affairs is most deplorable.
l aloft, and spurs in place, and haversack marked "W. W. Ball." Telegraphic Dispatches. Mechanicsville, N. Y., May 24.--The assassination of Col. Ellsworth has caused in this, his native town, the utmost sorrow and indignation. The father minutes to leave town, and left, the band playing the Rogue's March, with orders to return no more. Pittsburg, Pa., May 24--Col. Ellsworth's death was received here with profound sorrow. All the flags in the city were at half-mast. Poughkeepsie, May 24.--Upon the report of the death of Col. Ellsworth the flags were lowered half-mast, and the fire bells tolled. Washington, May 24.--A detachment of Col. Corcoran's Regiment, stationed on the southern slope of the Heights, seized aMay 24.--A detachment of Col. Corcoran's Regiment, stationed on the southern slope of the Heights, seized a train of cars this afternoon, containing some three hundred passengers, a portion of whom are retained as prisoners. It is difficult to learn the particulars of the seizure of the train, and the disposition of the passengers and prisoners, inasmuc
Cairo matters — a fleet to come down the Mississippi and attack Memphis. The following is an extract from a private letter received in Memphis, Tenn., from a gentleman in Cairo, dated May 24th. Its statements may be relied upon as substantially correct. The writer says: "Cairo is now quiet, notwithstanding the presence of 4,000 troops. No shipments are permitted to be made from this point to Kentucky, Missouri or southward — every kind of provision, even vegetables, being condemned as contraband and 'aid and comfort to the rebels.' During the past week the following articles have been taken from steamers by order of Col. Prentiss, and confiscated; 1,410 bags corn, 200 bags meal, 1,355 bags and barrels potatoes, 550 sacks bran, 30 casks ale, 950 barrels flour, and 1,250 barrels lime. "The report prevails that Col. Rodgers, of the United States Navy, who has been so journing in our midst for a few days, visited Mound City yesterday, for the purpose of purchasing the s
Mexican News. New Orleans May 25. --The New Orleans brig Angelo has arrived, with Vera Cruz advices to the 20th instant. She brings $6,000 in specie. A Manatitlan letter says gold has been taken from the waters of the Malatery; the diggings are considered very rich. There was great excitement caused by the discovery. Business was dull.
Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.from the Greenbrier White Sulphur Springs. White Sulphur Springs May 25. The anti Ordinance or submission vote here of thirty seven is mortifying to the citizens of the locality. It was swelled by an invasion of voters from Anthony's Creek Among the voters proper, it is true, there are a few submissionists; but they are much less respectable in numbers than the poll would indicate. It is a pity that in a county so much benefited by Southern liberality in the summer season — whose prosperity is to be so immensely enhanced by the increased throng of Southern people under the Confederacy (if not now, certainly after the war)--should give one vote against the Ordinance. But, while this is a shame and a pity, we are consoled by the reflection that the number so voting is few, and the vote for the Ordinance is overwhelming. The feeling of the community generally is most decided and patriotic. Greenbrier is true, and will so approve hers
Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.affairs in Winchester — war Ricmors — a trip to Harper's Ferry — Stoppage of mail intercourse, &c. Winchester, Va. May 28. It is pleasant to be able to say that I have no war news to send you. Our good old town is as serene to day as the blue May sky that bends above her. All apprehension of an early attack from the Yankees has disappeared. The passage of companies, battalions, and regiments through our streets has ceased. The only military spectacle that enlivens them is furnished by an occasional squad of Continentals--Company K, 4th Regiment, noted for their constant attendance upon John Brown, from the 18th of October, 1859, to the end of his valuable life, and now commanded by Capt. Avis, the jailor of that worthy,--on their way to mount guard over the Hospital, or the thirty-two pounders sent up from Richmond. A large number of these guns are still here, enough having been sent down, it is thought, for all necessary purposes. <
August 31st (search for this): article 7
re, brought by passengers which has been used abroad and intended for domestic use here; all books, pamphlets, philosophical apparatus and like things intended for the use of schools and colleges. When we add that all articles other than those we have enumerated above are charged with fifteen and ten per cent duties in about the ratio of two for the former rate to one for the latter, we have given a pretty good idea of the tariff that will take effect in the Southern States from the 31st of August next. The fifteen per cent. include among other things, ready-made clothing and dry goods in general, railroad iron, iron in bolts and bars, cutlery, chains, manufactures of brass, copper, tin, lead, pewter, and all manufactures of wood, such as carriages and so forth. The ten per cent. schedule is made up, for the most part, of coal, and articles used in the manufactures. It is very plain that this tariff act is a war measure; and that it is not designed as a permanent settlement
e latter are said to have triumphed. These accounts, however, have been received through a revolutionary source, and should be taken with many grains of allowance.--Until the decisive battle is fought at or near Bogota, it is impossible to say which party will succeed. It is pretty generally conceded, however, that the revolutionists have at present decidedly the advantage. The English steamer Talisman, from Carthagena, which port she left on the 9th inst., arrived at Aspinwall on the 11th. She reports five vessels-of-war being fitted out at the former port, with a force of one thousand men. It was rumored that their destination was Chagres or Aspinwall, and their object the seizure and subjugation of this Isthmus. This intelligence produced a profound sensation here, which was greatly increased on the 12th by the receipt of a telegraphic dispatch from Aspinwall, communicating the news of the departure from that port, without orders, of the Granadian schooners-of-war Presdient
evolutionists have at present decidedly the advantage. The English steamer Talisman, from Carthagena, which port she left on the 9th inst., arrived at Aspinwall on the 11th. She reports five vessels-of-war being fitted out at the former port, with a force of one thousand men. It was rumored that their destination was Chagres or Aspinwall, and their object the seizure and subjugation of this Isthmus. This intelligence produced a profound sensation here, which was greatly increased on the 12th by the receipt of a telegraphic dispatch from Aspinwall, communicating the news of the departure from that port, without orders, of the Granadian schooners-of-war Presdient, Ospina and Legitimized. Various are the conjectures as to the destination of these vessels. It is the opinion of many that they have gone to Carthagena to be turned over to Nieto, the revolutionary Governor of the State of Bolivar. Other again think that they have gone to Santa Marta, as most of the persons on board be
ch interests. The Commissioners from the so-called Southern Confederacy had had an interview with M. Thouvenal, the French Minister of Foreign Affairs, on the 13th inst. The French Senate was discussing a petition in favor of a continued occupation of Syria. At Paris, the Bourse was animated and higher, rentes closing on the 13th at 69f. The resignation of Prince Carigran as Lieutenant of Naples had finally been accepted, and Martino assumed that position. There were vague reports current that the Governments of England and France had agreed to recommend to Austria to cede Venetia to Italy for money and territorial considerations. teamer from Liverpool for New Orleans is advertised to sail on the 7th of August. The steamship Niagara, from Boston, via Halifax, arrived at Liverpool on the 13th instant. The steamship Columbia from New York, via St. Johns, N. F., arrived at Galway on the 14th The steamship Jura, from Quebec, arrived at Londonderr
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ...