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Wallace W. Barrett (search for this): chapter 14
er-General Joshua W. Sill. (2) Colonel Nicholas Greusel. Thirty-Sixth Illinois (1), Colonel Nicholas Greusel. Thirty-Sixth Illinois (2), Major Silas Miller. Thirty-Sixth Illinois (3), Captain Porter C. Olson. Eighty-Eighth Illinois, Colonel Francis T. Sherman. Twenty-First Michigan, Lieutenant-Colonel William B. McCreery. Twenty-Fourth Wisconsin, Major Elisha C. Hibbard. Second brigade: (1) Colonel Frederick Schaefer. (2) Lieutenant-Colonel Bernard Laiboldt. Forty-Fourth Illinois, Captain Wallace W. Barrett. Seventy-Third Illinois, Major William A. Presson. Second Missouri (1), Lieutenant-Colonel Bernard Laiboldt. Second Missouri (2), Major Francis Ehrler. Fifteenth Missouri, Lieutenant-Colonel John Weber. Third brigade: (1) Colonel Georce W. Roberts. (2) Colonel Fazilo A. Harrington. (3) Colonel Luther P. Bradley. Twenty-Second Illinois (1), Lieutenant-Colonel Francis Swanwick. Twenty-Second Illinois (2), Captain Samuel Johnson. Twenty-Seventh Illinois (1), Colonel Fazilo A. Har
Luther P. Bradley (search for this): chapter 14
ken ranks, thinned by only its killed and wounded-but few missing. When we came into the open ground, McCook directed Roberts's brigade-now commanded by Colonel Luther P. Bradley--to proceed a short distance to the rear on the Nashville pike, to repel the enemy's threatening attempt at our communications. Willingly and cheerfullyor Francis Ehrler. Fifteenth Missouri, Lieutenant-Colonel John Weber. Third brigade: (1) Colonel Georce W. Roberts. (2) Colonel Fazilo A. Harrington. (3) Colonel Luther P. Bradley. Twenty-Second Illinois (1), Lieutenant-Colonel Francis Swanwick. Twenty-Second Illinois (2), Captain Samuel Johnson. Twenty-Seventh Illinois (1), Colonearrington. Twenty-Seventh Illinois (2), Major William A. Schmitt. Forty-Second Illinois, Lieutenant-Colonel Nathan H. Walworth. Fifty-First Illinois (1), Colonel Luther P. Bradley. Fifty-First Illinois(2), Captain Henry F. Wescott. artillery: Captain Henry Hescock. First Illinois Battery, C. Captain Charles Houghtaling. Fourth In
Bardstown Bragg (search for this): chapter 14
t the right of Crittenden's corps could attack Bragg's centre in reverse, while Thomas supported Crht next morning, it was plainly indicated that Bragg had planned to swing his left on our right by of the two generals were almost identical; but Bragg took the initiative, beginning his movement abfederate lines, and that he was convinced that Bragg was massing on our right with the purpose of m. From this time till the evening of January 3 Bragg's left remained in our front, and continued tod in view only a defensive purpose, for unless Bragg dislodged the troops which were now massing int led by Breckenridge ending in entire defeat, Bragg retired from Murfreesboroa the night of Januarers and men. He lost 13,230, or 31.5 per cent. Bragg's effective force was 37,800 officers and men;e moment we were thrown on the defensive. Had Bragg followed up with the spirit which characterizefensive operations for a long time afterward. Bragg's intrenchments in front of Stone River were v[6 more...]
John C. Breckenridge (search for this): chapter 14
continued to show itself at intervals by weak demonstrations, which we afterward ascertained were directly intended to cover the desperate assault he made with Breckenridge on the left of Rosecrans, an assault that really had in view only a defensive purpose, for unless Bragg dislodged the troops which were now massing in front ofo withdraw General Polk's corps behind Stone River and finally abandon Murfreesboroa. The sequel proved this to be the case; and the ill-judged assault led by Breckenridge ending in entire defeat, Bragg retired from Murfreesboroa the night of January 3. General Rosecrans occupied Murfreesboroa on the 4th and 5th, having gaint instead he allowed us to gain time, intrench, and recover a confidence that at first was badly shaken. Finally, to cap the climax of his errors, he directed Breckenridge to make the assault from his right flank on January 2, with small chance for anything but disaster, when the real purpose in view could have been accomplished
lso attacked me, advancing across an old cotton-field in Sill's front in heavy masses, which were furiously opened upon by Bush's battery from Sill's line, and by Hescock's and Houghtaling's batteries, which had an oblique fire on the field from a cos brigades following. When my division arrived on this new ground, I posted Roberts on Negley's right, with Hescock's and Bush's guns, the brigade and guns occupying a low rocky ridge of limestone, which faced them toward Murfreesboroa, nearly southit could not be done, and we had to abandon them. Hescock also had lost most of his horses, but all his guns were saved. Bush's battery lost two pieces, the tangled underbrush in the dense cedars proving an obstacle to getting them away which his a: Captain Henry Hescock. First Illinois Battery, C. Captain Charles Houghtaling. Fourth Indiana Battery, Captain Asahel K, Bush. First Missouri Battery, G. Captain Henry Hescock. Battery C was attached to the Third Brigade; Fourth Indiana Battery
William P. Carlin (search for this): chapter 14
scock's and Houghtaling's batteries had been posted all the morning. The general course of this new position was at right angles with my original line, and it took the shape of an obtuse angle, with my three batteries at the apex. Davis, and Carlin of his division, endeavored to rally their men here on my right, but their efforts were practically unavailing, though the calm and cool appearance of Carlin, who at the time was smoking a stumpy pipe, had some effect, and was in strong contrast Carlin, who at the time was smoking a stumpy pipe, had some effect, and was in strong contrast to the excited manner of Davis, who seemed overpowered by the disaster that had befallen his command. But few could be rallied, however, as the men were badly demoralized, and most of them fell back beyond the Wilkinson pike, where they reorganized behind the troops of General Thomas. At this juncture the enemy's turning-column began advancing again in concert with Cheatham's division, and as the extreme left of the Confederates was directed on Griscom's house, and their right on the Blanto
Wilkinson pike, where they reorganized behind the troops of General Thomas. At this juncture the enemy's turning-column began advancing again in concert with Cheatham's division, and as the extreme left of the Confederates was directed on Griscom's house, and their right on the Blanton house, my new position was in danger of erly west, confronted the successful troops that had smashed in our extreme right. I had hardly got straightened out in this last place when I was attacked by Cheatham's division, which, notwithstanding the staggering blows it had previously received from Sill and Roberts, now again moved forward in conjunction with the wheelinement under the immediate command of Hardee. One of the most sanguinary contests of the day now took place. In fulfillment of Bragg's original design no doubt, Cheatham's division attacked on my left, while heavy masses under Hardee, covered by batteries posted on the high ground formerly occupied by my guns, assaulted my right,
condition, was naturally disheartening. The men had been made veterans, however, by the fortunes and misfortunes of the day, and as they went into their new places still confident of final success, it was plain to see that they felt a self-confidence inspired by the part they had already played. My headquarters were now established on the Nashville pike, about three miles and a half from Murfreesboroa; my division being aligned to the west of the pike, bowed out and facing almost west, Cleburn's division of the Confederates confronting it. Davis's division was posted on my right, and Walker's brigade of Thomas's corps, which had reported to me, took up a line that connected my left with Johnson's division. Late in the evening General Rosecrans, accompanied by General McCook, and several other officers whose names I am now unable to recall, rode by my headquarters on their way to the rear to look for a new line of battle — on Overall's creek it was said — that would preserve o
T. L. Crittenden (search for this): chapter 14
armies were in close proximity, and orders received during the night revealed the fact that Rosecrans intended to attack by throwing his left on the enemy's right, with the expectation of driving it in toward Murfreesboroa, so that the right of Crittenden's corps could attack Bragg's centre in reverse, while Thomas supported Crittenden by a simultaneous front assault; and from the movements of the enemy at daylight next morning, it was plainly indicated that Bragg had planned to swing his left oCrittenden by a simultaneous front assault; and from the movements of the enemy at daylight next morning, it was plainly indicated that Bragg had planned to swing his left on our right by an exactly similar manoeuvre, get possession of the railroad and the Nashville pike, and if possible cut us off from our base at Nashville. The conceptions in the minds of the two generals were almost identical; but Bragg took the initiative, beginning his movement about an hour earlier than the time set by Rosecrans, which gained him an immense advantage in execution in the earlier stages of the action. During the evening of the 30th, feeling keenly all the solicitude which
Jefferson C. Davis (search for this): chapter 14
ult, Hardee extended the attack gradually along in front of Davis, his movement taking the form of a wheel to the right, the my division. Johnson's division soon gave way, and two of Davis's brigades were forced to fall back with it, though stubborpon my extreme right, and the front of Woodruffs brigade of Davis's division, which brigade still held on in its first positisent to Sill's rear before daylight. Both Johnson's and Davis's divisions were now practically gone from our line, havinge of an obtuse angle, with my three batteries at the apex. Davis, and Carlin of his division, endeavored to rally their men effect, and was in strong contrast to the excited manner of Davis, who seemed overpowered by the disaster that had befallen higed to fall back from the point where Woodruffs brigade of Davis's division had rallied after the disaster of the early mornest, Cleburn's division of the Confederates confronting it. Davis's division was posted on my right, and Walker's brigade of
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