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G. K. Warren (search for this): chapter 1
y attacking Hooker in his new position, when news came from Fredericksburg which instantly arrested his operations in that direction. Sedgwick was seriously menacing his flank and rear. So early as Saturday morning, Sedgwick had thrown his corps over the Rappahannock, at Franklin's crossing-place, and, after some skirmishing, had lain quietly until near midnight, when he received the order, already mentioned, to join the main army at Chancellorsville. He began the movement at once. General Warren arrived at two o'clock in the morning May 3, 1863 to hasten it, but it was daylight before the head of Sedgwick's column entered Fredericksburg. He was soon afterward joined by General Gibbon, of Couch's corps, with about six thousand troops, who had been left at Falmouth, and had crossed on pontoons just below the rapids and ford at that place. General Early, with his own division, and Barksdale's brigade of Mc-Laws's division, were on the heights to oppose Sedgwick. Barksdale occ
Hobart Ward (search for this): chapter 1
orps devolved temporarily on Rodes, who, under the circumstances, thought it advisable not to attempt a forward movement in the night. General Stuart, whom Hill called to the command, agreed with him, and the Confederates occupied the night in defensive operations, and in preparations for renewing the struggle in the morning. Sickles, as we have observed, had reached Pleasanton at Hazel Grove, and at once attempted to recover a part of the ground lost by Howard. Birney's division, with Hobart Ward's brigade in front, charged down the plank road at midnight, drove back the Confederates, recovered some lost ground, and brought away several abandoned guns and caissons. Other attacks were made, but little more was accomplished, when Sickles, then reporting directly to Hooker, was ordered to fall back and take position, and intrench in a new line formed by the chief, on heights between Fairview (a short distance west of Chancellorsville) and the Confederate lines in front of Dowdall's
James S. Wadsworth (search for this): chapter 1
ve miles. Chancellorsville, by Hotchkiss and Allan, page 15. Even with his superior force Hooker's army was composed of seven corps, and comprised twenty-three divisions. The First Corps was commanded by General J. F. Reynolds; the Second, by General D. N. Couch; the Third, by General D. E. Sickles; the Fifth, by General G. G. Meade; the Sixth, by General J. Sedgwick; the Eleventh, by General O. O. Howard, and the Twelfth, by General H. W. Slocum. The division commanders were Generals J. S. Wadsworth J. C. Robinson, A. Doubleday, W. S. Hancock, J. Gibbon, W. H. French, D. D. Birney, H. G. Berry, A. W. Whipple, W. T. H. Brooks, A. P. Howe, J. Newton, C. Griffin, G. Sykes, A. A. Humphreys, C. Devens, A. Von Steinwehr, C. Schurz, S. Williams, J. W. Geary, A. Pleasanton, J. Buford, and W. W. Averill. The last three were commanders of cavalry under General G. Stoneman, who was the chief of the mounted men. Lee's army was composed of two corps, the First commanded by General Longs
J. S. Wadsworth (search for this): chapter 1
t, for Lee, while watching the visible enemy in front of him, was not aware of the passage of the Rappahannock by the turning column, until the three corps were on their way toward the Rapid Anna. Taking position a little below Fredericksburg, Sedgwick caused pontoon bridges to be laid on the night of the 28th, April, 1863. and before daylight Brooks's division crossed near the place of Franklin's passage, See page 489, volume II. and captured and drove the Confederate pickets there. Wadsworth's division also crossed. Breastworks were thrown up, and there was every appearance April 30. of preparations for passing over a larger force. Pursuant to orders, Sickles now moved his corps stealthily away, and, marching swiftly, crossed the river at the United States Ford, and hastened to Chancellorsville. When Lee discovered Hooker's real intentions, he did not fly toward Richmond, as his antagonist supposed he would, but prepared to fight. He Ford near Falmouth. this is a v
map on page 42), the key of the position, extending about eight miles in length. During the siege General Getty stormed and carried, with the Eighth Connecticut and Eighty-ninth New York, aided by Lieutenant Lamson and the gun-boats, a Confederate battery on the west branch of the Nansemond. He captured 6 guns and 200 prisoners. General Peck mentioned with commendation Generals Corcoran, Terry, Dodge, and Harland, and Colonels Dutton and Gibbs, commanding front lines; Colonels Gurney and Waddrop, commanding reserves; Colonels Spear and Onderdonk, of the cavalry. and Captain Follet. chief of artillery. The forts were in charge of the following officers: Fort Union, Colonel Drake; Nansernond, Colonel Hawkins; Halleck, Colonel Sullivan; Draw-bridge Battery, Colonel Davis; Battery Mansfield, Colonel Worth; the Redan and Battery Sosecrans, Colonel Thorpe; Battery Massachusetts, Captain Johnspn; Battery Montgomery, Colonel England; Battery Stevens, Colonel Pease; Fort Dix, Colonel McEv
ed in March by a division under General Getty, making his whole force about fourteen thousand. Now he was about to comply, reluctantly, with a summons from Foster for three thousand troops to oppose Hill, when a Confederate mail, captured by General Viele, who was in command at Norfolk, informed him of Longstreet's plans,.and the important fact that Hill's was only a co-operating movement. Viele had ascertained that Longstreet was in possession of complete drawings of all of Peck's works, aViele had ascertained that Longstreet was in possession of complete drawings of all of Peck's works, and had determined to get in his rear and surprise him. The detachment was detained. Admiral Lee was asked, by telegraph, to send gun-boats up the Nansemond, and made a prompt and practical answer; and Longstreet quickly perceived that his attempt at a surprise was a failure. Then he determined to carry the works at Suffolk by assault. Longstreet's first care was to drive away the half-dozen armed tug and ferry boats (commanded by Captains Lee and Rowe) which lay in the way of his crossing
Howe, J. Newton, C. Griffin, G. Sykes, A. A. Humphreys, C. Devens, A. Von Steinwehr, C. Schurz, S. Williams, J. W. Geary, A. Pleasanton, J. Buford, and W. W. Averill. The last three were commanders of cavalry under General G. Stoneman, who was the chief of the mounted men. Lee's army was composed of two corps, the First commanded by General Longstreet, and the Second by Stonewall Jackson. Of these General T. J. Jackson's entire corps, comprising the divisions of A. P. Hill, D. H. Hill, Trimble, and Early, and the divisions of Anderson and McLaws, of Longstreet's corps, were now present in front of Hooker. Also the brigades of Fitzhugh Lee, and W. H. F. Lee, of Stuart's cavalry, with 170 pieces of artillery, making a total of a little more than 60,000 men of all arms. Hooker could not hope to take these works, so he made preparations to force Lee out of them by turning Confederate General. this shows the costume of a Confederate General, according to the regulations of their
rear. A sanguinary conflict quickly ensued. Bartlett dashed forward, captured the school-house garrison, and, with furious onset, drove the Confederates, and seized the crest of the hill. The triumph and possession was brief. Wilcox soon drove him back, released the school-house prisoners, and seized their custodians, and, with General Semmes, pushed the Nationals back to Sedgwick's reserves, near the toll-gate, where the well-served batteries of Williston, Rigby, and Parsons, under Colonel Tompkins, checked the pursuers. The conflict had been short, sharp, and sanguinary, and increased Sedgwick's loss in the morning at Fredericksburg to about five thousand men. Wearied and disheartened, the National troops, like their foes, slept on their arms that night, with little expectation of being able to advance in the morning. Hooker, at the same time, seemed paralyzed in his new position. His army was being beaten in detail, and the result of the battle at Salem Church, only seven mil
George Todd (search for this): chapter 1
n of Mr. Chancellor, he made his Headquarters that night. Pleasanton's cavalry was thrown out upon the roads leading to Fredericksburg and Spottsylvania Court-House. A part of these that night had an encounter with some of Stuart's cavalry, near Todd's tavern, on the road between Chancellorsville and Spottsylvania Court — House. From that old inn, around Hooker's Headquarters near Falmouth. which he had bivouacked Fitzhugh Lee's brigade to watch the Nationals, Stuart set out with his staff for General Lee's Headquarters, when he encountered a regiment of Pleasanton's cavalry. He sent back to Todd's tavern for a regiment, and at the head of his staff gallantly attacked his foe. Ample assistance came, and after a sharp encounter in the bright moonlight the National force was broken and scattered. While the movements on Hooker's right were so successfully performed, his left wing, under Sedgwick, composed of his own corps (Sixth), and those of Reynolds (First), and Sickles (Thir
th commendation Generals Corcoran, Terry, Dodge, and Harland, and Colonels Dutton and Gibbs, commanding front lines; Colonels Gurney and Waddrop, commanding reserves; Colonels Spear and Onderdonk, of the cavalry. and Captain Follet. chief of artillery. The forts were in charge of the following officers: Fort Union, Colonel Drake; Nansernond, Colonel Hawkins; Halleck, Colonel Sullivan; Draw-bridge Battery, Colonel Davis; Battery Mansfield, Colonel Worth; the Redan and Battery Sosecrans, Colonel Thorpe; Battery Massachusetts, Captain Johnspn; Battery Montgomery, Colonel England; Battery Stevens, Colonel Pease; Fort Dix, Colonel McEvilly. and the Confederates, with overwhelming numbers, tried in vain every skill and strategy of modern warfare to accomplish their object. Finally, on the day when Hooker and Lee had their severe battle at Chaneellorsville, May 3, 1863. Longstreet, foiled and disheartened, turned his back on Peck and retreated, pursued as far as the Blackwater by National
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