hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in descending order. Sort in ascending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Benjamin F. Butler 1,260 10 Browse Search
U. S. Grant 1,168 12 Browse Search
United States (United States) 1,092 0 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 694 24 Browse Search
David D. Porter 362 4 Browse Search
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) 358 8 Browse Search
H. W. Halleck 335 5 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee 333 1 Browse Search
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) 308 0 Browse Search
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) 282 2 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler. Search the whole document.

Found 898 total hits in 151 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ...
John W. Turner (search for this): chapter 16
f that corps, advanced from Port Walthall Junction. Two pieces of artillery that had been lost were re-captured by a gallant achievement of the Seventh Connecticut Volunteers, under Lieutenant-Colonel Roman, who drove the enemy back with loss to them of three hundred killed. The woods from which the enemy had been driven took fire under a high wind and their dead and severely wounded were burned. General Terry held his position till night and then withdrew to his place in line. As Brigadier-General Turner's division was retiring, General Hagood, by authority of General Bushrod Johnson of the Confederate forces, sent a flag of truce asking permission to bury their dead and to bring off their wounded, which was granted. On the morning of the 10th I received advices by signal from General Kautz announcing his return with his entire command. He had failed to reach Hicksford, but had burned the Stony Creek bridge, the Nottoway Bridge, and Jarratt's Station, and captured about one hund
York (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
mand of the Department of Virginia and North Carolina, with headquarters at Fortress Monroe. The Union forces were then in occupation of the peninsula between the York and James Rivers, up to the line of Williamsburg, the cities of Norfolk and Portsmouth, and a line extending towards Suffolk, about seven miles from Norfolk, on thll their ammunition and supplies in twenty-four hours after I was notified of the march of his army across the Rapidan. By besieging West Point, at the head of York River, and beginning to fortify it, erecting store-houses, as if I was making a base of supplies for my army when it landed to meet the army of the enemy, I could so ed cavalry at Williamsburg, and all the white cavalry at the line beyond Norfolk in the direction of Suffolk. About the 1st of May West Point, at the head of York River, was seized, preparations were made for building wharves and landings, and fortifications were begun, as if with the intention of making this the base of operat
Mobile, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
on secretly. He pressed upon me over and over again that my objective point must be Richmond, and that I must be there on the south side within ten days after his march began, as he would be there on the north side of the James to join me. General Grant further informed me that General Banks was moving up Red River, and had been ordered to get through within a limited time, so that if I needed additional force, a part of his army would be ordered to reinforce me instead of moving against Mobile. He said that it was particularly desirable that I should have the Weldon Railroad cut at Hicksford, as that would prevent reinforcements coming from the South and supplies from reaching Richmond, so that we should be able the more easily to starve Lee out. He remained some three days examining into the details of the proposed campaign, studying with care the topography of the country around Richmond, with which he seemed to have no acquaintance, and discussing matters of the exchange
Tunstall (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
essed at the intrigues in and out of his Cabinet to defeat his renomination; but that was now assured, and the question of a man for the second place on the ticket was freely and earnestly discussed. Mr. Lincoln thought and so did I that Mr. Hamlin's position during the four years of his administration made it advisable to have a new name substituted. Several men were freely talked of, but without conclusion as to any particular person. Not long after that I was requested to come to the White House again. I went and the subject was again brought up by the President, and the result of our conversation was that Mr. Lincoln asked me to go to Fortress Monroe and ask General Butler if he would be willing to run, and, if not, to confer with him upon the subject. General Butler positively declined to consider the subject, saying that he preferred to remain in the military service, and he thought a man could not justify himself in leaving the army in the time of war to run for a politic
Williamsburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
pation of the peninsula between the York and James Rivers, up to the line of Williamsburg, the cities of Norfolk and Portsmouth, and a line extending towards Suffolk,e upon the enemy. December 13, Brigadier-General Wistar sent a force from Williamsburg to Charles City Court-House and captured two companies of rebel cavalry, beiit was, was permitted to make the attempt with about three thousand men from Williamsburg. See Appendix No. 15. His march was a brilliant one, his dispositions adm but success was snatched from him, because of the escape, from his guard at Williamsburg, the night before the expedition started, of a prisoner who had been orderednd all the colored infantry and artillery at Hampton, the colored cavalry at Williamsburg, and all the white cavalry at the line beyond Norfolk in the direction of Suert West, with eighteen hundred colored cavalry, moved at the same time from Williamsburg to meet us at Turkey Bend, opposite City Point. The armed transports, und
Portsmouth, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
insubordinate and hostile the fighting around Drury's Bluff false despatches of Grant's successes Butler supposes him rapidly approaching and acts accordingly On the second day of November, 1863, without solicitation, I was detailed to the command of the Department of Virginia and North Carolina, with headquarters at Fortress Monroe. The Union forces were then in occupation of the peninsula between the York and James Rivers, up to the line of Williamsburg, the cities of Norfolk and Portsmouth, and a line extending towards Suffolk, about seven miles from Norfolk, on the line of the Dismal Swamp Canal in Virginia, and by the aid of the gunboats, the Currituck, Albemarle, and Pamlico Sounds, Roanoke Island, Hatteras Bank, Morehead City, Beaufort, the line of railroad from New Berne, and the cities of New Berne, Plymouth, and Washington, and as much land as was fairly within the pickets of the garrison of those cities in North Carolina. Upon inspection of these several posts it
Norfolk (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
rs at Fortress Monroe. The Union forces were then in occupation of the peninsula between the York and James Rivers, up to the line of Williamsburg, the cities of Norfolk and Portsmouth, and a line extending towards Suffolk, about seven miles from Norfolk, on the line of the Dismal Swamp Canal in Virginia, and by the aid of the gunNorfolk, on the line of the Dismal Swamp Canal in Virginia, and by the aid of the gunboats, the Currituck, Albemarle, and Pamlico Sounds, Roanoke Island, Hatteras Bank, Morehead City, Beaufort, the line of railroad from New Berne, and the cities of New Berne, Plymouth, and Washington, and as much land as was fairly within the pickets of the garrison of those cities in North Carolina. Upon inspection of these sevown and Gloucester Point, and all the colored infantry and artillery at Hampton, the colored cavalry at Williamsburg, and all the white cavalry at the line beyond Norfolk in the direction of Suffolk. About the 1st of May West Point, at the head of York River, was seized, preparations were made for building wharves and landings,
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 16
me by General Grant, in the results of which I had the highest hope, and for which I had been laboring. Cameron and myself had from the beginning of the war been in warm friendly relations and I owed much to him which I can never repay save with gratitude. Therefore, he spoke with directness. The President, as you know, said he, intends to be a candidate for re-election, and as his friends indicate that Mr. Hamlin should no longer be a candidate for Vice-President, and as he is from New England, the President thinks his place should be filled by someone from that section. Besides reasons of personal friendship which would make it pleasant to have you with him, he believes that as you were the first prominent Democrat who volunteered for the war, your candidature would add strength to the ticket, especially with the War Democrats, and he hopes that you will allow your friends to co-operate with his to place you in that position. Please say to Mr. Lincoln, I replied, that whi
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
am, with some armed transports, went up the James River to Lower Brandon and destroyed a large quanomattox, and Osborn nineteen miles down the James River from Richmond. The banks of both rivers ars Fort Pocahontas, on the north side of the James River, and at Fort Powhatan, shortly above, on thy embark his troops at Newport News [on the James River], transfer them to Acquia Creek [near Washiusand men — to operate on the south side of James River, Richmond being your objective point. To tyour holding close to the south bank of the James River as you advance. Then, should the enemy be join me there, i. e., on the north bank of the James, thus scooping Richmond out of the Confederacyles K. Graham, moved at night on the 4th up James River, destroyed the enemy's signal stations, ands, having in view an early demonstration up James River from the right of our position. And with the send up a force along the north bank of the James to search for torpedoes, and the wires and bat[3 more...]
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 16
, and the cities of New Berne, Plymouth, and Washington, and as much land as was fairly within the pgraph wires would not work between there and Washington so that the President's pardon could not reainst Richmond. Troops could be brought from Washington and the North by water transportation in thrthe celerity possible, yet our troops got to Washington in time to repulse Early's attack. Grant aid he was quite sure that the government at Washington would not permit him thus to uncover it. He can against them. The necessity of covering Washington with the Army of the Potomac, and of coverinuty assigned by the President, I returned to Washington and reported the result to Mr. Lincoln. He sion of the lieutenant-general, I ordered Washington, N. C., to be evacuated, and the troops sent toommand of this department, that Plymouth and Washington were worse than useless to us, was unhappilyGrant had assured me were to be collected in Washington, to be sent to the weak points, with the ide[13 more...]
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ...