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Piedmont, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.34
in the time in which a year later we could easily have made Manassas Junction. Jackson's brigade being in front reached Piedmont at 8 o'clock in the morning of the 19th, and two hours later took the cars for Manassas. Our brigade did not reach PiedPiedmont until late that night. Incidents of the march were the wading of the Shenandoah — the cheers with which we greeted the announcement that Beauregard had defeated the attack upon him at Bull Run — the frequent raids we made on blackberry patches nd the crowds of people who turned out to see us pass and supply us with what food they had. I remember that on reaching Piedmont, late in the night, my regiment was assigned a place of bivouac which was covered with water, and I looked around for soeet restorer, balmy sleep, soon brought me rest as refreshing as I ever enjoyed on downy pillows. We were detained at Piedmont until late in the night of the 20th by being unable to obtain transportation. I witnessed here an incident which illust
Manassas, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.34
ole march that night. But it proved a most wearisome and unsatisfactory march — the straggling was fearful — and we only reached Piedmont Station, thirty-four miles from Manassas, in the time in which a year later we could easily have made Manassas Junction. Jackson's brigade being in front reached Piedmont at 8 o'clock in the morning of the 19th, and two hours later took the cars for Manassas. Our brigade did not reach Piedmont until late that night. Incidents of the march were the wading usly, expecting the enemy to strike the railroad; that for miles we heard the roar of the battle then progressing; that once we disembarked and formed line of battle on a report that the enemy were advancing on the road, and that we reached Manassas Junction when the excitement was at its height, and were double-quicked out to the Lewis House, where we arrived just in time to witness the rout of McDowell's grand army, and join in the shouts of victory. I shall give no description of the batt
Dunavant (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.34
must be content to take back seats when we get home. I gave him my hand there in the dark, and my pledge that I would stand with him on the camp platform. These frequent movements with cavalry, often requiring long or very rapid marches, made the men begin to speak of the regiment as the foot cavalry. But the first time I ever heard the sobriquet publicly applied was after the evacuation of Manassas, in March, 1862, while General Ewell was holding with his division the line of the Rappahannock. Our regiment had been on picket at Bealton Station as a support to Stuart's cavalry, and the enemy were rapidly advancing in large force, when another infantry regiment came down on a train of cars to relieve us. We had just gotten on the train, our friends were rapidly forming line of battle to meet the Federal advance, Jeb Stuart was going to the front with his fighting jacket on, and our train was slowly moving back, when a battery of the enemy galloped into position, and threw some
Piedmont, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.34
tly superior force — that this was a forced march to save the country, and that he expected us to step out bravely, to close up our ranks, and do all that could be required of patriotic soldiers who were fighting for liberty, home and fireside. I remember how we cheered that order, and the swinging stride with which we set out, as if determined to make the whole march that night. But it proved a most wearisome and unsatisfactory march — the straggling was fearful — and we only reached Piedmont Station, thirty-four miles from Manassas, in the time in which a year later we could easily have made Manassas Junction. Jackson's brigade being in front reached Piedmont at 8 o'clock in the morning of the 19th, and two hours later took the cars for Manassas. Our brigade did not reach Piedmont until late that night. Incidents of the march were the wading of the Shenandoah — the cheers with which we greeted the announcement that Beauregard had defeated the attack upon him at Bull Run — the
Jackson County (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.34
our ranks, and do all that could be required of patriotic soldiers who were fighting for liberty, home and fireside. I remember how we cheered that order, and the swinging stride with which we set out, as if determined to make the whole march that night. But it proved a most wearisome and unsatisfactory march — the straggling was fearful — and we only reached Piedmont Station, thirty-four miles from Manassas, in the time in which a year later we could easily have made Manassas Junction. Jackson's brigade being in front reached Piedmont at 8 o'clock in the morning of the 19th, and two hours later took the cars for Manassas. Our brigade did not reach Piedmont until late that night. Incidents of the march were the wading of the Shenandoah — the cheers with which we greeted the announcement that Beauregard had defeated the attack upon him at Bull Run — the frequent raids we made on blackberry patches (a witty surgeon of our brigade remarked that our bill of fare on the march was th
J. E. B. Terrill (search for this): chapter 3.34
the First Maryland and five of the Thirteenth Virginia, and several companies of cavalry, captured Mason's, Munson's and Hall's hills, from which we could plainly see the dome of the Capitol at Washington. The day we captured Munson's hill, Major Terrill was sent with a detachment of the Thirteenth on a scout, during which we drove in the enemy's pickets, ate their smoking dinner, and pursued them back until they rallied on their reserve, and our gallant Major thought it would not be prudent to advance further. Accordingly we were moving back to our reserve when we met Stuart. What is the matter? I hope you are not running from the Yankees, said the gay cavalier. Major Terrill explained, and Stuart said, That was all right, but the Maryland boys are coming, and I think we must go back and beat up the quarters of those people. Just then a scout rode up and informed him that the enemy were fully five thousand strong and had five pieces of artillery. (We numbered about five hund
J. E. B. Stuart (search for this): chapter 3.34
on the 18th of July Johnston left a cordon of Stuart's cavalry to conceal the movement from Generale latter part of July, or the first of August, Stuart, with five companies of the First Maryland and. It was my privilege to see a good deal of Stuart at this period, at his Headquarters, on a red orchard, a tomato patch, or a cornfield, when Stuart would call for volunteers to drive in the enemdifferent points. On the 11th of September, Stuart took 305 men of the Thirteenth Virginia, two ctachment of cavalry. I remember how delighted Stuart was, as he declared, We have whipped them out Your old friend, Griffin. To this note Stuart made the following reply: Dear Griffinbefore long. Yours to count on, beauty. Stuart was made a Brigadier-General for his gallantryn on picket at Bealton Station as a support to Stuart's cavalry, and the enemy were rapidly advancinld, but we never forgot those bright days with Stuart, when we had our outpost service with the foot[3 more...]
Kirby Smith (search for this): chapter 3.34
is date every private in our ranks thought himself as good as the highest officer. While General Kirby Smith was superintending the embarkation of the troops, a private in my company asked him a question, sir, and if you were disposed to act the gentleman you would give me a civil answer. General Smith at once grasped the hilt of his sword, but the soldier quietly drew his pistol and said: If hat sword I'll shoot you. The private was arrested, but Colonel Hill interceded for him and General Smith generously consented to his release. I do not know whether it is true, as was currently r. But it may be well to correct a widely circulated error in reference to the movements of Gen. Kirby Smith, who was represented as stopping the train four miles above the Junction, and marching acros the fields to strike the Federal army in flank, and thus decide the fate of the day. Now, as Gen. Smith was that day in command of our brigade (until he was wounded, and Col. Elzey resumed the comma
Thomas L. Rosser (search for this): chapter 3.34
pointed him out as a model cavalryman. Those were merry days on the outpost, when we fought for a peach orchard, a tomato patch, or a cornfield, when Stuart would call for volunteers to drive in the enemy's pickets, or amuse himself with having Rosser's artillery practice at Professor Lowe's balloon, or sending up a kite with lantern attached, or causing the long roll to beat along McClellan's whole front, by sending up sky-rockets at night from different points. On the 11th of September, Stuart took 305 men of the Thirteenth Virginia, two companies of his cavalry, and two pieces of Rosser's battery, and advanced on Lewinsville, where, by a skillful handling of his little command, he drove off a force of the enemy consisting of a brigade of infantry, eight pieces of artillery, and a detachment of cavalry. I remember how delighted Stuart was, as he declared, We have whipped them out of their boots. He was also chuckling over the following note, which was left for him with a cit
nes. Paper no. 2.--First Manassas and its Sequel. Remaining for some days longer in front of Winchester, and several times called into line of battle on false alarms, the private soldier was forming his own plan of campaign when our great commander received information that Beauregard was being attacked at Manassas, and determined at once to hasten to his relief. Accordingly, about noon on the 18th of July Johnston left a cordon of Stuart's cavalry to conceal the movement from General Patterson, and put his column in motion for Ashby's Gap and Manassas. As soon as we had gotten about two miles from Winchester there was read to us a ringing battle order from our chief, in which he stated that Beauregard was being attacked at Manassas by a greatly superior force — that this was a forced march to save the country, and that he expected us to step out bravely, to close up our ranks, and do all that could be required of patriotic soldiers who were fighting for liberty, home and fi
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