hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 16,340 0 Browse Search
England (United Kingdom) 6,437 1 Browse Search
France (France) 2,462 0 Browse Search
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) 2,310 0 Browse Search
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) 1,788 0 Browse Search
Europe 1,632 0 Browse Search
New England (United States) 1,606 0 Browse Search
Canada (Canada) 1,474 0 Browse Search
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) 1,468 0 Browse Search
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) 1,404 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). Search the whole document.

Found 314 total hits in 53 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6
age per capita commerce, combining imports and exports to obtain the total commerce, at $2.31 per capita in 1800, $2.34 in 1830, $3.76 in 1850, $6.01 in 1860, $8.14 in 1870, $10.26 in 1880, $11.84 in 1890, and $13.27 in 1899. What has caused this . The application of steam to transportation of merchandise by rail began in England in 1825, and in the United States in 1830, the number of miles of railway in the world in 1830 being about 200. In that year, the world's commerce, according to th1830 being about 200. In that year, the world's commerce, according to the best estimates obtainable, was $1,981,000,000 as against $1,659,000,000 in 1820, an increase in the decade of barely 17 per cent., while in the preceding decades of the century the increase had been even less. By 1840, railways had increased to 5, for 1828.(f)Royal Geographical Society estimate. (c)Based on Michelet's estimate for 1845.(g)Mulhall's estimates, except 1830, 1890, and 1898. (d)Based on Behm-Wagner estimate for 1874.(h)Saetbeer's estimates prior to 1860. To discuss the part
e in the decade of barely 17 per cent., while in the preceding decades of the century the increase had been even less. By 1840, railways had increased to 5,420 miles, and commerce had increased to $2,789,000,000, an increase of 40 per cent. From 1841840 to 1850, railways increased to 23,960 miles, and commerce had increased to $4,049,000,000, a gain of 45 per cent. By 1860, the railways had increased to 67,350 miles and commerce to $7,246,000,000, an increase of 79 per cent. By 1870, the railroadsan in 1819, and the total steam tonnage afloat in 1820 is estimated at 20,000 tons, against 5,814,000 of sail tonnage. By 1840, steam tonnage had increased to 368,090, while sail has grown to 9,012,000; by 1860, steam had reached 1,710,000, while santury, we find that the carrying power of vessels on the ocean had increased from 4,026,000 tons in 1800, to 10,482,000 in 1840; 21,730,000 in 1860; 37,900,000 in 1880; 48,800,000 in 1890; and 63,225,000 in 1898-99, of which last enormous total but 1
sell in Europe may contract his goods before shipping, and those who would make purchases in the Orient or the tropics can give their orders to-day, with the confidence that the goods will start to-morrow and reach them at a fixed date in time for the markets at their most favorable season. The growth of the telegraph and ocean cable has, like that of the railway and steamship, being contemporaneous with the growth of commerce. The first telegraph for commercial purposes was constructed in 1844, and so quickly did its influence become apparent that several thousand miles were in existence by 1850, while by 1860 the total had reached nearly 100,000 miles, by 1870 280,000 miles, by 1880 440,000 miles, by 1890 768,000 miles, and by 1900 1,000,000 miles. Submarine cables, by which the international commerce is guided and multiplied, date from 1851, in which year 25 miles were put into operation across the English Channel. By 1860 the total length of successful lines was about 1,500 mil
8501,435,000,00081,400,0004,422,000363,928,000 18602,551,000,000142,300,0007,180,0001,333,981,000 18702,775,000,000213,400,00011,910,0001,263,015,000 18803,601,000,000340,000,00018,140,0001,150,814,000 18905,600,000,000466,000,00025,160,0001,060,052,000 18985,900,000,000610,000,00037,150,0001,950,000,000 (a)Malte-Brun's estimate for 1804.(e)Levasseur's estimate for 1878. (b)Based on Balbi's estimate for 1828.(f)Royal Geographical Society estimate. (c)Based on Michelet's estimate for 1845.(g)Mulhall's estimates, except 1830, 1890, and 1898. (d)Based on Behm-Wagner estimate for 1874.(h)Saetbeer's estimates prior to 1860. To discuss the part which the various nations have had in this commerce, the relations of imports to exports, or the classes of articles exchanged between the great sections of the globe, would carry this study beyond reasonable limits. In all of the above statements, the term commerce has covered both exports and imports, and has included the exchange of
commerce, combining imports and exports to obtain the total commerce, at $2.31 per capita in 1800, $2.34 in 1830, $3.76 in 1850, $6.01 in 1860, $8.14 in 1870, $10.26 in 1880, $11.84 in 1890, and $13.27 in 1899. What has caused this wonderful increlways had increased to 5,420 miles, and commerce had increased to $2,789,000,000, an increase of 40 per cent. From 1840 to 1850, railways increased to 23,960 miles, and commerce had increased to $4,049,000,000, a gain of 45 per cent. By 1860, the raiwas constructed in 1844, and so quickly did its influence become apparent that several thousand miles were in existence by 1850, while by 1860 the total had reached nearly 100,000 miles, by 1870 280,000 miles, by 1880 440,000 miles, by 1890 768,000 m000. From that time to the beginning of the century, the average gold production was about $8,000,000 a year; from 1800 to 1850, about $15,000,000 a year; and, since that date, it has ranged steadily upward, until it has reached over $300,000,000 a y
he railway and steamship, being contemporaneous with the growth of commerce. The first telegraph for commercial purposes was constructed in 1844, and so quickly did its influence become apparent that several thousand miles were in existence by 1850, while by 1860 the total had reached nearly 100,000 miles, by 1870 280,000 miles, by 1880 440,000 miles, by 1890 768,000 miles, and by 1900 1,000,000 miles. Submarine cables, by which the international commerce is guided and multiplied, date from 1851, in which year 25 miles were put into operation across the English Channel. By 1860 the total length of successful lines was about 1,500 miles, though one cable laid across the Atlantic, and another through the Red and Arabian seas, meantime, had worked long enough to prove the practicability of the enterprise. By 1870 the submarine cables in operation amounted to about 15,000 miles, by 1880 to about 50,000 miles, by 1890 to 132,000 miles, and by 1898 to 170,000 miles, the number of message
at $2.31 per capita in 1800, $2.34 in 1830, $3.76 in 1850, $6.01 in 1860, $8.14 in 1870, $10.26 in 1880, $11.84 in 1890, and $13.27 in 1899. commerce had increased to $4,049,000,000, a gain of 45 per cent. By 1860, the railways had increased to 67,350 miles and commerce to $7,246,0nage had increased to 368,090, while sail has grown to 9,012,000; by 1860, steam had reached 1,710,000, while sail was 14,890,000; by 1870, sted from 4,026,000 tons in 1800, to 10,482,000 in 1840; 21,730,000 in 1860; 37,900,000 in 1880; 48,800,000 in 1890; and 63,225,000 in 1898-99, rent that several thousand miles were in existence by 1850, while by 1860 the total had reached nearly 100,000 miles, by 1870 280,000 miles, bear 25 miles were put into operation across the English Channel. By 1860 the total length of successful lines was about 1,500 miles, though oed on Behm-Wagner estimate for 1874.(h)Saetbeer's estimates prior to 1860. To discuss the part which the various nations have had in this c
otal commerce, at $2.31 per capita in 1800, $2.34 in 1830, $3.76 in 1850, $6.01 in 1860, $8.14 in 1870, $10.26 in 1880, $11.84 in 1890, and $13.27 in 1899. What has caused this wonderful increase iways had increased to 67,350 miles and commerce to $7,246,000,000, an increase of 79 per cent. By 1870, the railroads had increased to 139,860 miles and commerce to $10,663,000,000; by 1880, the railr sail has grown to 9,012,000; by 1860, steam had reached 1,710,000, while sail was 14,890,000; by 1870, steam tonnage was 3,040,000, and sail had dropped to 13,000,000; by 1880, steam had become 5,880and miles were in existence by 1850, while by 1860 the total had reached nearly 100,000 miles, by 1870 280,000 miles, by 1880 440,000 miles, by 1890 768,000 miles, and by 1900 1,000,000 miles. SubmariArabian seas, meantime, had worked long enough to prove the practicability of the enterprise. By 1870 the submarine cables in operation amounted to about 15,000 miles, by 1880 to about 50,000 miles,
00 18702,775,000,000213,400,00011,910,0001,263,015,000 18803,601,000,000340,000,00018,140,0001,150,814,000 18905,600,000,000466,000,00025,160,0001,060,052,000 18985,900,000,000610,000,00037,150,0001,950,000,000 (a)Malte-Brun's estimate for 1804.(e)Levasseur's estimate for 1878. (b)Based on Balbi's estimate for 1828.(f)Royal Geographical Society estimate. (c)Based on Michelet's estimate for 1845.(g)Mulhall's estimates, except 1830, 1890, and 1898. (d)Based on Behm-Wagner estimate for 1874.(h)Saetbeer's estimates prior to 1860. To discuss the part which the various nations have had in this commerce, the relations of imports to exports, or the classes of articles exchanged between the great sections of the globe, would carry this study beyond reasonable limits. In all of the above statements, the term commerce has covered both exports and imports, and has included the exchange of merchandise between nation and nation throughout the entire world, wherever records of such com
0,0001,010,00076,063,000 1830820,000,00025,100,0001,585,00094,419,000 18401,310,000,00044,800,0002,680,000134,841,000 18501,435,000,00081,400,0004,422,000363,928,000 18602,551,000,000142,300,0007,180,0001,333,981,000 18702,775,000,000213,400,00011,910,0001,263,015,000 18803,601,000,000340,000,00018,140,0001,150,814,000 18905,600,000,000466,000,00025,160,0001,060,052,000 18985,900,000,000610,000,00037,150,0001,950,000,000 (a)Malte-Brun's estimate for 1804.(e)Levasseur's estimate for 1878. (b)Based on Balbi's estimate for 1828.(f)Royal Geographical Society estimate. (c)Based on Michelet's estimate for 1845.(g)Mulhall's estimates, except 1830, 1890, and 1898. (d)Based on Behm-Wagner estimate for 1874.(h)Saetbeer's estimates prior to 1860. To discuss the part which the various nations have had in this commerce, the relations of imports to exports, or the classes of articles exchanged between the great sections of the globe, would carry this study beyond reasonable limits.
1 2 3 4 5 6