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Browsing named entities in William Alexander Linn, Horace Greeley Founder and Editor of The New York Tribune.

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Henry Wilson (search for this): chapter 8
the war to arouse Northern opinion, make clear the aim of the slave power, and elect an antislavery President. Clay's compromise and Webster's famous speech had their origin in the fear that the South would attempt to destroy the Union, and Henry Wilson almost excuses Webster in view of the picture which the orator drew of the conflict that such an attempt would incite. The South had been growing more and more restless under the continued opposition to the introduction of slavery in Californd Chase, Abolitionists like Owen Lovejoy and Giddings, and Democrats like Trumbull and Blair saw a common ground on which they could fight under the same banner; and on this ground the foundation of the new Republican party was laid in 1854. Henry Wilson says: At the outset, Mr. Greeley was hopeless, and seemed disinclined to enter upon the contest. So often defeated by Northern defection therein, he distrusted Congress, nor had he faith that the people would reverse the verdict of their
Henry Wilson (search for this): chapter 9
State, or to a dozen different States, the right to dissolve this Union. It can only be legally dissolved as it was formed-by the free consent of all the parties concerned. Aside from its support of Greeley's schemes for meddling, and its hostility to Lincoln, the Tribune vigorously supported the Union cause during the war, and so concentrated on itself the hatred of the Southern sympathizers in New York city that, during the draft riots in 1863, its building was attacked by the mob. Henry Wilson gave to its managing editor, Sidney Howard Gay, the credit of keeping the Tribune loyal during the war. When Lincoln's first call for troops came, and war was actually begun, the nation had had no experience in warfare for fifty years. It had to rely, too, not on an organized force, but on raw recruits, hurriedly summoned from peaceful pursuits, and who had to be organized, drilled, fed, and sheltered under the direction of officers who were themselves without experience, save what s
Henry Wilson (search for this): chapter 11
Webb, James Watson, on Greeley's dress, 11. Webster, Daniel, on Texas question, 138, 139, 141 ; 7th of March speech, 153-158. Weed, Thurlow, founding of the Albany Journal, 40; first meeting with Greeley, 42; the Jeffersonian, 43; Weed and Greeley contrasted, 44, 46; Clay's defeat in 1837, 45; discovery of Greeley, 46; Greeley's independence of, 78; on Greeley's proposed nomination for Governor, 172; Greeley's complaints to Seward, 173-176; Seward's letter to, 177; on Greeley's letter to Seward, 182; defeats Greeley's chances for office, 182. Whig (daily newspaper), 47. Whig party, 1836 to 1840, 41-52; final defeat of, 163. White, Horace, on New York banking laws, 35; reports Liberal Republican platform, 239. Wilmot proviso, Greeley on, 158, 159. Wilson, Henry, on Greeley, 166,187. Winchester, Jonas, 26. Women's suffrage, Greeley on, 89. Wood, Fernando, proposed secession of New York city, 185. Y. Young, John Russell, on Grant's administration, 214.
137-148; listless support of Taylor, 148-151; defiance of New York business interests, 149-151, 161, 162; opposition to slavery in Congress, 151; Compromise of 1850, 151-163; reply to Calhoun, 154; on Webster's 7th of March speech, 158; abandons Wilmot proviso, 159; on fugitive slave law, 161-163; favors Scott's nomination, 163; on Kansas-Nebraska contest, 163, 165; early attitude toward Republican party, 166, 178; attack by Rust, 166; on Fremont's defeat, 167; Dred Scott decision, 168; Lecomptetter to Seward, 182; defeats Greeley's chances for office, 182. Whig (daily newspaper), 47. Whig party, 1836 to 1840, 41-52; final defeat of, 163. White, Horace, on New York banking laws, 35; reports Liberal Republican platform, 239. Wilmot proviso, Greeley on, 158, 159. Wilson, Henry, on Greeley, 166,187. Winchester, Jonas, 26. Women's suffrage, Greeley on, 89. Wood, Fernando, proposed secession of New York city, 185. Y. Young, John Russell, on Grant's administratio
George William (search for this): chapter 11
ariff views, 110-113; presidential campaign of 1844, 119, 120; Greeley's choice in 1848, 148; defended as a slaveholder, 126, 144, 145; on Texas annexation, 142; Compromise of 1850, 151-163. Cochran, John, nominated for Vice-President, 199. Coggeshall, James, loan to Greeley, 59. Compromise of 1850,151-163. Congdon, C. T., 72. Constitutionalist, Greeley's work for, 26. Cooper libel suits, 11, 68. Crandall, Miss, opposition to her plan for negro education, 132. Curtis, George William, 72. D. Dallas, vote on tariff, 121. Dana, Charles A., 72, 82, 105. Davis, Judge, David, candidate for presidential nomination, 235. Davis, Jefferson, Greeley on, 218, 220-222. Depew, C. M., anecdote of Greeley, 107. De Tocqueville on early American newspapers, 27. Douglas, Stephen A., in the Kansas-Nebraska contest, 163-165; Greeley favors for Senator, 178. Dred Scott decision, 168. E. Evening Post, 111, 1.5 note. Express news-gathering, 73-76. F.
Horace White (search for this): chapter 3
ablish a United States Bank, the removal of the Federal deposits, the distribution of the public funds among the States, Harrison's defeat by Van Buren, the expansion of the paper currency by the issues of the many new banks throughout the country, and the panic of 1837, all came within the scope of the New Yorker's editorials. In New York State, before the year 1838, bank charters were granted only as the Legislature thought fit. Accustomed as we are to the spoils system of to-day, says Horace White, it sounds oddly to read that bank charters were granted by Whig and Democratic Legislatures only to their own partizans. Not only was this the common practise, but shares in banks, or the right to subscribe to them, were parceled out to political bosses in the several counties. There was opposition to all banks in the agricultural counties, and the laboring classes were generally hostile to paper money. A meeting in the City Hall Park, in March, 1837, called to consider the high pr
Horace White (search for this): chapter 10
ti-Adams feeling among some of these delegates was very strong, and they were quoted as saying, after the publication of his letter to Wells, that Grant would carry their State against Adams by 50,000 majority. As events proved, this feeling caused Adams's defeat. The convention organized with Senator Schurz in the chair. Two days were devoted to preliminary matters, and on Friday, May 3, the platform was adopted and the balloting for candidates took place. The platform, reported by Horace White, editor of the Chicago Tribune, opened with an address charging the Grant administration with corruption, and the President with using his official position for personal ends, keeping corrupt men in public places, and being unequal to the duties of his office, and declaring that a party thus led and controlled can no longer be of service to the best interests of the republic. The resolutions demanded the immediate removal of all disabilities imposed for participation in the rebellion, a
Horace White (search for this): chapter 11
Webb, James Watson, on Greeley's dress, 11. Webster, Daniel, on Texas question, 138, 139, 141 ; 7th of March speech, 153-158. Weed, Thurlow, founding of the Albany Journal, 40; first meeting with Greeley, 42; the Jeffersonian, 43; Weed and Greeley contrasted, 44, 46; Clay's defeat in 1837, 45; discovery of Greeley, 46; Greeley's independence of, 78; on Greeley's proposed nomination for Governor, 172; Greeley's complaints to Seward, 173-176; Seward's letter to, 177; on Greeley's letter to Seward, 182; defeats Greeley's chances for office, 182. Whig (daily newspaper), 47. Whig party, 1836 to 1840, 41-52; final defeat of, 163. White, Horace, on New York banking laws, 35; reports Liberal Republican platform, 239. Wilmot proviso, Greeley on, 158, 159. Wilson, Henry, on Greeley, 166,187. Winchester, Jonas, 26. Women's suffrage, Greeley on, 89. Wood, Fernando, proposed secession of New York city, 185. Y. Young, John Russell, on Grant's administration, 214.
E. P. Whipple (search for this): chapter 6
n's associations in country villages. The great place for lectures in New York city was the Tabernacle, which seated 3,000 persons. Greeley's audiences there numbered on an average 1,200 in the early fifties. In a course of lectures delivered in Chicago in 1853, when its population was about 30,000, Greeley stood second as a drawing card, being only preceded by Bayard Taylor in a list which included John G. Saxe, R. W. Emerson, Theodore Parker, George William Curtis, Horace Mann, and E. P. Whipple. In 1848 Greeley was elected to Congress, for the only time in his career, accepting a nomination in the upper district of New York city, to fill a vacancy caused by the unseating of a Democrat on charges of fraud at the polls, without the seating of his Whig opponent. As the term would last only from December to March, and the original candidate declined the nomination for the short term when the nomination for the full term was denied him, Greeley got the place. He attracted wide
John Wentworth (search for this): chapter 6
age men had the upper hand of me, and I was told that a paper was drawn up for signatures to see how many would agree to stand by each other in voting my expulsion, but that the movement was crushed by a terse interrogatory remonstrance by Hon. John Wentworth, then a leading Democrat. Why, you blessed fools, warmly inquired long John, do you want to make him President? Wentworth's remark showed how strongly public feeling had shaped itself on Greeley's side of the main question. In one of Wentworth's remark showed how strongly public feeling had shaped itself on Greeley's side of the main question. In one of the debates in the House a speaker declared that he had not seen a single newspaper that did not approve of Greeley's course. How restive the public are regarding attempts of members of Congress to increase unduly their own emoluments may be learned by recalling the excitement caused by the act of 1816 increasing the pay of members (including those then in office) from $6 a day to $1,500 a year (Clay's vote for this bill nearly causing his defeat for reelection), and the outburst of denunciat
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