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s nine hundred miles away, striking a terrible blow at Chickamauga. The year 1863 passes by without other significant event in the story of the Army of Northern Virginia. Meade indeed, once in November, deployed his lines along Mine Run in seeming overtures of battle, but quickly concluding that discretion was the better part of valor, he marched back across the Rappahannock, content with his observations. 1864—Wilderness, Spotsylvania, cold Harbor, Petersburg, Lynchburg. But as the May blossoms in 1864, we hear once more the wonted strain of spring, tramp, tramp, tramp, the boys are marching, and Grant (who had succeeded Meade), crossing the Rappahannock with 141,000 men, plunges boldly into the Wilderness on May 4th, leading the sixth crusade for the reduction of Richmond. But scarce had he disclosed his line of march, than Lee, with 50,000 of his braves, springs upon him and hurls him back, staggering and gory, through the tangled chapparal of the Wilderness, and from t
who, under Lee's directions, has stealthily marched around him, comes thundering in his rear, and alas! for Fighting Joe, he can only illustrate his pugnacious soubriquet by the consoling reflection that He who fights and runs away Will live to fight another day, for Chancellorsville shines high on the list of Confederate victories, and indeed was one of the grandest victories that ever blazoned the annals of war. The fall of Stonewall Jackson. But alas! too, for the victor,—on May 2nd, in the culminating act of the drama, Jackson himself had fallen, and never more is the foot cavalry to see again along the smoking lines that calm, stern face;—never to hear again that crisp, fierce order, Give them the bayonet! which so often heralded the triumphant charge; never is the Southern land to be thrilled again with his familiar bulletin—God blessed our arms with victory. At the age of 39— at a time of life when the powers of manhood are ordinarily scarce full-orbed, he has t
ne Run in seeming overtures of battle, but quickly concluding that discretion was the better part of valor, he marched back across the Rappahannock, content with his observations. 1864—Wilderness, Spotsylvania, cold Harbor, Petersburg, Lynchburg. But as the May blossoms in 1864, we hear once more the wonted strain of spring, tramp, tramp, tramp, the boys are marching, and Grant (who had succeeded Meade), crossing the Rappahannock with 141,000 men, plunges boldly into the Wilderness on May 4th, leading the sixth crusade for the reduction of Richmond. But scarce had he disclosed his line of march, than Lee, with 50,000 of his braves, springs upon him and hurls him back, staggering and gory, through the tangled chapparal of the Wilderness, and from the fields of Spotsylvania; and though the redoubtable Grant writes to the Government on May 12th, I propose to fight it out on this line if it takes all summer, when we look over the field of Cold Harbor on June 3d, we see there, stre
boys are marching, and Grant (who had succeeded Meade), crossing the Rappahannock with 141,000 men, plunges boldly into the Wilderness on May 4th, leading the sixth crusade for the reduction of Richmond. But scarce had he disclosed his line of march, than Lee, with 50,000 of his braves, springs upon him and hurls him back, staggering and gory, through the tangled chapparal of the Wilderness, and from the fields of Spotsylvania; and though the redoubtable Grant writes to the Government on May 12th, I propose to fight it out on this line if it takes all summer, when we look over the field of Cold Harbor on June 3d, we see there, stretched in swaths and piled in reeking mounds 13,000 of his men,—the killed and wounded of his last assault in the over-land campaign, and when Grant ordered his lines to attack again the flinty front of Lee, they stood immobile,—in silent protest against the vain attempt, and in silent eulogy of their sturdy foe. One summer month had been summer time enough
he privates of each company electing by ballot the officers that were to command them. A singular exercise of suffrage was this, but there was a free ballot and a fair count, and an exhibition worthy of That fierce Democracy that thundered over Greece To Macedon and Artaxerxes' throne. —an exhibition which would have delighted the heart of Thomas Jefferson, and which certainly put to blush the autocratic theory that armies should be mere compact masses of brute force. Still later on, May 31st, Johnston had sallied forth and stormed and taken the outer entrenchments and camps of McClellan's army at Seven Pines, capturing ten pieces of artillery, six thousand muskets, and other spoils of war, and destroying the prestige of the second On to Richmond movement. But ere the day was done victory had been checked, and glory had exacted costly tribute, for Johnston himself had fallen, terribly wounded. The hero, covered with ten wounds received in Florida and Mexico, had been prostra
by the Army of Northern Virginia, and all but the first receiving their repulse by the army led by Lee. But Grant in some sort, veiled his reverses by immediately abandoning attack on the north side of the James, which he crossed in the middle of June,—attempting to capture Petersburg on the south side by a coup de main. But in this, after four days successive assaults which ended in vain carnage, he failed again; and almost simultaneously Hunter's invasion through the Valley was intercepted aring dead, yet speaketh. Come, child, in thy spotless innocence; come, woman, in thy purity; come, youth, in thy prime; come, manhood, in thy strength; come, age, in thy ripe wisdom; come citizen, come soldier, let us strew the roses and lilies of June around his tomb, for he, like them, exhaled in his life Nature's beneficence, and the grave has consecrated that life, and given it to us all; let us crown his tomb with the oak, the emblem of his strength, and with the laurel the emblem of his gl
rth and stormed and taken the outer entrenchments and camps of McClellan's army at Seven Pines, capturing ten pieces of artillery, six thousand muskets, and other spoils of war, and destroying the prestige of the second On to Richmond movement. But ere the day was done victory had been checked, and glory had exacted costly tribute, for Johnston himself had fallen, terribly wounded. The hero, covered with ten wounds received in Florida and Mexico, had been prostrated by another; and when June 1st dawned on the confronting armies, the Army of Northern Virginia was without the leader who held its thorough confidence, but now lay stricken well-nigh unto death. The casualty which thus deprived the army of its honored commander, and closed to him the opportunity which, in large measure, his own great skill had created, opened the opportunity of Lee. Fortunate the State, and great the people from whom sprung two such sons—fortunate the army that always had a leader worthy of it—happy he
o the Wilderness on May 4th, leading the sixth crusade for the reduction of Richmond. But scarce had he disclosed his line of march, than Lee, with 50,000 of his braves, springs upon him and hurls him back, staggering and gory, through the tangled chapparal of the Wilderness, and from the fields of Spotsylvania; and though the redoubtable Grant writes to the Government on May 12th, I propose to fight it out on this line if it takes all summer, when we look over the field of Cold Harbor on June 3d, we see there, stretched in swaths and piled in reeking mounds 13,000 of his men,—the killed and wounded of his last assault in the over-land campaign, and when Grant ordered his lines to attack again the flinty front of Lee, they stood immobile,—in silent protest against the vain attempt, and in silent eulogy of their sturdy foe. One summer month had been summer time enough for Grant along that impervious line; and there at Cold Harbor practically closed the sixth expedition aimed directly
er pause to weep. We fire our salute over the ashes of our heroic dead; and again the bugles sound boots and saddles, and the long roll is beating. Less than a month has passed, and again the Army of Northern Virginia is in motion, and while Hooker is groping around to ascertain the whereabouts of his adversary, the next scence unfolds: General Early has planned and executed a flank march around Winchester, worthy of Stonewall Jackson,—the men of his division are mounting the parapets on June 14th, and capturing Milroy's guns. General Edward Johnston's division is pursuing Milroy's fugitives down the Valley pike. General Rodes has captured Martinsburg with 100 prisoners, and five cannon,—Ewell's corps is master of the Valley,—and by June 24th, the Army of Northern Virginia is in Pennsylvania, while for the third time the Army of the Potomac is glad if it can interpose to prevent the fall of Washington—and a sixth commander has come to its head—General George C. Meade. Then fo
is groping around to ascertain the whereabouts of his adversary, the next scence unfolds: General Early has planned and executed a flank march around Winchester, worthy of Stonewall Jackson,—the men of his division are mounting the parapets on June 14th, and capturing Milroy's guns. General Edward Johnston's division is pursuing Milroy's fugitives down the Valley pike. General Rodes has captured Martinsburg with 100 prisoners, and five cannon,—Ewell's corps is master of the Valley,—and by June 24th, the Army of Northern Virginia is in Pennsylvania, while for the third time the Army of the Potomac is glad if it can interpose to prevent the fall of Washington—and a sixth commander has come to its head—General George C. Meade. Then follows the boldest and grandest assault of modern war— the charge upon the Federal centre entrenched on the heights of Gettysburg—a charge that well-nigh ended the war with a clap of thunder, and was so characterized by brave design and dauntless
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