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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). Search the whole document.

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e shown, was the only one exposed. This corps, added to that of Longstreet, would have been sufficiently strong to fight a defensive battle against Hooker, but it would have found it difficult to resist long enough, single-handed, to allow the First corps time to return from Culpeper. Longstreet, on the contrary, was not menaced as Hill, who was watching the movements of his adversaries along the left bank of the river, and holding himself ready to follow them; so that on the morning of the 14th, when he saw that the latter had abandoned the Falmouth heights, he promptly set out to join Longstreet. On the 15th the situation of the two armies was therefore considerably changed. The movement of the Federals was being completed: the Army of the Potomac, concentrated at Manassas and at Fairfax, covered Washington, ready to fight the enemy if he should advance against the capital. This movement was accomplished very quietly. The Second and Sixth corps, which closed up the march, rea
follow them; so that on the morning of the 14th, when he saw that the latter had abandoned the Falmouth heights, he promptly set out to join Longstreet. On the 15th the situation of the two armies was therefore considerably changed. The movement of the Federals was being completed: the Army of the Potomac, concentrated at Mant Martinsburg and the tail of it on the plank-road between Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, said the President, the animal must be very slim somewhere. On the 15th, Milroy's fate was known, and his conduct more severely criticised than it deserved to be. This time, however, it was Harper's Ferry itself, the object of Halleck'he First corps—whose effective force Pickett had raised to three divisions by his arrival from North Carolina with three brigades —took up the line of march on the 15th. Stuart was ordered to cover this movement by keeping on his right. The cavalry division, reduced to four brigades by the departure of Imboden and Jenkins, had b
at Williamsport, after dislodging them from Martinsburg. The substantial population of all the neighboring towns in Maryland, remembering the incursions of the previous year, fled in crowds, with all they could carry off with them; horses, mules, and especially cattle, which they knew the Confederates were greatly in need of, were driven northward in large herds, and these caravans, increasing in size at every step by the fear they created on all sides, finally reached Harrisburg. On the 16th the capital of Pennsylvania was in a great state of excitement, and while the people worked day and night in raising barricades and regular fortifications, which they would probably have had no means of defending, a solid mass of fugitives was hurrying along the left bank of the Susquehanna, thinking there was no safety except north of that river. Never, it is stated, had the bridge-toll produced such heavy receipts. It was precisely in the hope of not finding Cumberland Valley completely d
do justice to their discipline and good behavior. It is asserted, however, that he took a number of free negroes, whom he sent South to be sold as slaves. On the 17th, while people were expecting to see him continue his raid, and the Federals already believed that the whole of Lee's army was at his back, he suddenly retraced hisreet's arrival within reach of the latter city. Imboden, at the west, had made a movement on the 16th similar to that of Jenkins, and, occupying Cumberland on the 17th, had cut off General Kelley's communications with Maryland. As soon as Lee, who had remained at Culpeper, was apprised that Hill was on the way to join him, feces so near the enemy, issued the necessary orders on the 16th (a day of rest granted to his troops) for putting all his army corps in motion on the morning of the 17th, en échelon, by the right bank of the river which waters Washington, in the direction of Harper's Ferry, which place he expected to reach in two forced marches. B
the fords of the Potomac as circumstances might require. He sent the Fifth corps to Aldie, with instructions to place Barnes' division at Pleasonton's disposal in order to sustain him in his operations against Stuart near the Blue Ridge. On the 18th the other army corps were directed to take the following positions, which they occupied that same evening or the next morning: the Twelfth corps in the vicinity of Leesburg; the Eleventh in the rear, along the Aldie road, near Goose Creek; the Firnt two bridge-equipages, under proper escort, to the mouth of the Monocacy, and on the 18th everything was ready for throwing these bridges over the Potomac at Nolan's Ferry. The Second corps, The Twelfth corps took position at Leesburg on the 18th. The Second corps was then at Sangster's Station, whence it moved on the 20th to Centreville, and thence toward Thoroughfare Gap.—Ed. in taking position at Leesburg the next day, as we have stated, was only within ten miles of this point. Hooker
sh to provoke a serious engagement. Pleasonton, on his part, being desirous of allowing the infantry time to join him, did not push matters to extremes. On the 19th, having deployed his divisions, Buford on the right and Gregg on the left, Pleasonton resumed his aggressive movement. Stuart, although he had not yet received thl roads converge, and finally Paris, located in the very gorge of the mountain. It is this last-mentioned road that Stuart was following. Jones' arrival on the 19th, and Hampton's on the following day, gave the latter a numerical superiority over the enemy's cavalry, of which he was fully determined to take advantage. The daymen, and the Unionists about the same number. While Stuart was engaged at Middleburg, Longstreet had followed the route which Lee had traced out for him. On the 19th he passed through Upperville, while his columns occupied defiles of the Blue Ridge—McLaws at Ashby's Gap, Hood at Snicker's Gap, a connection being formed between
last-mentioned road that Stuart was following. Jones' arrival on the 19th, and Hampton's on the following day, gave the latter a numerical superiority over the enemy's cavalry, of which he was fully determined to take advantage. The day of the 20th, however, passed without any serious encounter, because the last reinforcements that were expected on both sides did not arrive until evening. On the side of the Federals these reinforcements consisted of the infantry division of General Barnes. him. On the 19th he passed through Upperville, while his columns occupied defiles of the Blue Ridge—McLaws at Ashby's Gap, Hood at Snicker's Gap, a connection being formed between them by Pickett, who was posted on the summit of the ridge. On the 20th, Longstreet, having been ordered to hold himself in readiness to cross the Potomac, deemed it expedient to draw near this river, and, abandoning the Blue Ridge, he crossed the Shenandoah. The next day, on learning that Stuart was in full retreat
took position along the right bank at Shepherdstown, as if for the purpose of menacing Harper's Ferry and watching its garrison; Johnson, crossing the river, had posted himself at Sharpsburg, on that bloody battlefield which contained the bones of so many Confederate soldiers; while Rodes, who was already on the other side, had advanced as far as Hagerstown. This time Maryland was effectually occupied, and the uneasiness which took possession of the public in the North was justified. On the 21st, before knowing the result of the battle of Ashby's Gap, Lee, wishing to take advantage of this uneasiness in order to throw confusion in the ranks of his adversaries, adopted a bold resolve. He ordered Ewell to march as far as Harrisburg and take possession of this capital if possible. By striking Harrisburg his object was to reach the White House and disturb the deliberations of the Federal government. Rodes arrived on the 22d, and Johnson on the 23d, at Greencastle, whilst Jenkins, prec
capital if possible. By striking Harrisburg his object was to reach the White House and disturb the deliberations of the Federal government. Rodes arrived on the 22d, and Johnson on the 23d, at Greencastle, whilst Jenkins, preceding them, entered Chambersburg, and Early, bearing to the right, occupied Cavetown at the foot of Souachments to destroy the Northern Central Railroad and its branches to the largest practicable extent. We shall leave him now to return to Virginia, where, on the 22d, we left the Federal army and Stuart's cavalry, which is watching it, along the line of the Bull Run Mountains. On his arrival at Fairfax, Hooker, foreseeing that s, finding now a good opportunity for deserting, carried much valuable information to the enemy; so that Ewell's movement upon Hagerstown, which was executed on the 22d, was known to Hooker on the 23d, and on the 25th the latter was fully informed of the passage of the Potomac by Hill's corps at Shepherdstown. Two bridges had be
defence he had hitherto met only with success. The proof of this will be found in the letter he wrote to Mr. Davis on the 23d, just as he was ordering his army to cross the Potomac. He was asking him earnestly to send on the last available man thaach the White House and disturb the deliberations of the Federal government. Rodes arrived on the 22d, and Johnson on the 23d, at Greencastle, whilst Jenkins, preceding them, entered Chambersburg, and Early, bearing to the right, occupied Cavetown at the foot of South Mountain. It was on this same day, the 23d, that Lee, being apprised of Pleasonton's retreat, issued marching orders to his other two army corps. Hill, crossing the Potomac first, reached Chambersburg on the 27th; Longstreetormation to the enemy; so that Ewell's movement upon Hagerstown, which was executed on the 22d, was known to Hooker on the 23d, and on the 25th the latter was fully informed of the passage of the Potomac by Hill's corps at Shepherdstown. Two brid
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