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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 9, 1861., [Electronic resource].

Found 1,234 total hits in 589 results.

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Deceased. --Hon. Henry G. Lemon, a distinguished citizen of Georgia, died in Macon a few days ago. The death of his son, at Manassas, had a serious effect upon his health. Mr. James Rae, one of the oldest merchants of Macon, died on the 30th ult.
At Pensacola. --Brigadier General. R. H. Anderson, lately appointed to the command of the Confederate forces at Pensacola, arrived there on the 30th ultimo.
ssion troops have had a general stampede; large numbers of them had deserted and gone home. Major Mordecai and the Confederates. We learn from Philadelphia that Major Mordecai, late in command of the Watervliet Arsenal, publishes a card denying any complicity in furnishing the Confederates with drawings of a machine for expanding rifle bullets, as charged. He acknowledges having allowed Abraham Snyder, the inventor of the machine, to have copies made, but shows by letter, dated in January last, that he communicated to Col. Craig, of the Ordnance Department, saying that it was not too late to retract the permission if he thought necessary. Major Mordecai since his resignation has been residing in Philadelphia, supported by a daughter who is a school teacher. News via Washington. In the Washington Star of Thursday evening we find the following: Fairfax County, Va., Sept. 5. --From information, of the correctness of which there can be no question, I can inform y
oyal disposition might be liberated on taking the oath of allegiance; the answer was in the negative, and orders were issued to keep the whole party close prisoners. Arrests in Philadelphia. A Philadelphia paper of the 5th inst. says: Yesterday afternoon, E. S. Perkins, chief armorer of the arsenal at Bridesburg, and Robert Bolton, concerned in the manufacture of patent primers, at Frankford, were arrested on the charge of furnishing arms and munitions of war, in the month of April, to persons then engaged in open rebellion against the United States. The arrest of the accused grew out of an intercepted correspondence between Perkins and Bolton and A. Hitchcock, by which, it seems, that Hitchcock, who was an agent for the authorities of several of the Southern States then on the point of seceding, was desirous of obtaining from Perkins and Bolton cannon primers for use in the expected war. The primers were made to order, and, it is presumed, forwarded to their destinat
April 19th (search for this): article 4
The Baltimore Riot cases. --The trials of parties indicted for rioting in Baltimore on the 19th of April last, commenced on the 4th inst. In the cases of Joseph Barrett and James Logan, the jury rendered a verdict of not guilty. The case of James Whiteford was argued, but not concluded, and James Girvin, Jr., John Myers, and Thomas Tibbels were subsequently arraigned. The list of indictments includes several other parties.
hip them if they attack us, and the North will then learn it can't at once overrun us as it fancied. The leaders will pause. There will be a reaction up there. We will work all the harder and all the better for our victory, drilling our men and consolidating our resources. The Northern cities will become discontented. Foreign nations will ask when the cotton ports are to be open. The North will have no reply. We shall be better able to fight in November than we shall be to fight in June. Every week's delay will add to the complications and weakness of the North, and the end of the year will find them further from their aim than ever — divisions in their councils, even disturbances in their populations, while we, inspired by the approach of success, will exhibit increasing energy and unanimity." A part of the programme has been already accomplished, but it does not follow that the remainder of the prophecy will be fulfilled with as much nicety — so far as the result of the ac
irs." Five persons were wounded. Turkey. The Circassian have proclaimed a Republic. It was reported that three engagements had taken place at Herzegovina, and that the Turks were victorious. Omar Pacha had issued a proclamation that the Sultan would accord with all the demands of the Montenegrins. Portugal. The Cortes has confirmed the authorization of the Government for opening the ports for the importation of grain. India and China. The Bombay mail of July 27th had reached Malta. The cholera was ravaging the famine districts. The harvest prospects were cheerful. The famine expenditure was expected to cease in October. The French had claimed protection over Madagascar. The dates from Calcutta were to July 29th. The prospects of the indigo crop were bad. Incessant rain prevailed. The money market was stringent. Imports were weaker, and prices lower in some cases. The journals report that five cities of Tart
th all the demands of the Montenegrins. Portugal. The Cortes has confirmed the authorization of the Government for opening the ports for the importation of grain. India and China. The Bombay mail of July 27th had reached Malta. The cholera was ravaging the famine districts. The harvest prospects were cheerful. The famine expenditure was expected to cease in October. The French had claimed protection over Madagascar. The dates from Calcutta were to July 29th. The prospects of the indigo crop were bad. Incessant rain prevailed. The money market was stringent. Imports were weaker, and prices lower in some cases. The journals report that five cities of Tartary have been made over to the Russians by the Emperor of China. A new insurrection had broken out near Pekin. Japan. Shanghai dates to July 4th say that the relations between the European and Japanese Governments are likely to be disturbed. Foreign merchants were
August 19th (search for this): article 16
The army and money Votes of the Federal Congress.[from the London Times, Aug. 19] The armies of Xerxes and the wealth of Solomon would hardly sustain a comparison with the hosts of men and mountains of money which — at any rate, upon paper — are placed at the command of President Lincoln for the suppression of the Southern Confederacy.--We may venture, perhaps, to pass without too rigorous a scrutiny the bold, though some what gasconading, vote by which the intelligence of the defeat at Manassas was received in Congress. The millions so precipitately offered represented, probably, the patriotic resolution of the North to spend its last dollar in the preservation of the Union; but, without pressing these loose figures to their literal import, we are really astounded at the conclusions which are forced upon us by recent reports. It used to be thought that this country had attained an unhappy but unapproachable eminence in national indebtedness. Half our entire expenditure in or
August 20th (search for this): article 7
An Englishman's views of the American war,Mr. Russell's letter to the London Times. Mr. Russell's last letter, published in the London Times August 20th,bears date at Washington, August 5th. The subjoined extracts embrace the principal portions of it: Secession policy. "Let us only hold on till October, and we are safe." That, or something like it, was said to me over and over again in the South by men why play no inconsiderable part in the mystery drama of the Confederates. And when I asked one of these gentlemen, more than two months ago, what chance there was of the North giving the South all that time, I was answered almost in these words: "We are bound to go to the assistance of Virginia. The whole of the Northern frontier abounds in good position, which can be fed by the rail from the South. The Abolitionists will come and give us battle. We are certain to whip them if they attack us, and the North will then learn it can't at once overrun us as it fancied. The
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