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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: October 5, 1863., [Electronic resource].

Found 414 total hits in 223 results.

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October 3rd (search for this): article 3
From the Southwest. Atlanta, Oct. 3--10-12 A. M. --The trains report all quiet before Chattanooga. A species to the Intelligencer, dated the 30th, says: "In the exchange of wounded prisoners to-day we had twenty-five hundred Yankees, and they had forty-one Confederates." Gen. Dan. Adams has determined to remain in the Yankee lines until his condition is so improved as to justify his safe removal. Gov. Brown reached camp to-day, and was enthusiastically cheered by the troops. The enemy still held Knoxville.
May, 1863 AD (search for this): article 19
amendments, the bill to further provide for the public defence. The bill to require railroad and canal companies to transport troops and munitions of war, without the right to demand pay in advance, was passed. Mr. Randolph, from the Military Committee, reported a bill to authorize the arrest of deserters by the civil authorities, which was ordered to a second reading. Mr. Collier called up a resolution in reference to slavery in the Confederate States, introduced by him in May, 1863. and discussed it at length. It was referred to the Committee on Confederate Relations. In the House the Senate bill entitled "An act declaring what contracts shall be payable in currency," was read a first and second times and referred to the Committee on Finance. Senate bill to abolish the Auditing Board, and to provide for the settlement of all claims remaining unsettled by said board, was also read a first and second times and referred to the Committee on Finance. Senate
September 7th, 1863 AD (search for this): article 2
Notice. --Was brought to my lad, Sept. 7th, 1863, a negro man named George Washington; says he belongs to Joseph Bryant, of Bosher Parish, Louisiana, and was hired in the army to cook for Burrel McKinney, of the 9th Louisiana regiment, and was captured by the Yankees with our wagon trains in Pennsylvania, and made his escape near Fredericksburg and swam the river, and says that Col. Hodge, of the 9th Louisiana regiment, is acquainted with him. Said negro is of a black complexion and about 23 years old, is 5 feet 10 inches high, and smartly knock kneed. The owner will come forward, pay expenses, and take him away. Robt. Lumpkin. oc 5--1aw5t
September 19th, 1863 AD (search for this): article 1
s over and unite with the first in pushing the enemy still further down the river, until all the bridges and fords had been uncovered and our entire army passed over. This plan was frustrated, according to report, by a counter movement which is explained in the following order of the Federal General Thomas. This order was found upon the person of Adj't Gen. Mubleman, of Gen. Palmer's staff, who subsequently fell into our hands. Headq'rs 14th Army Corps,Near McDaniel's House,Sept. 19, 1863--9 A. M. Major-General Palmer: The rebels are reported in quite heavy force between you and Alexander Mill. If you advance as soon as possible on them in front, while I attack them in flank, I think we can use them up. Respectfully, your ob't serv't, Geo. H. Thomas, Major-Gen'l Jr. Commanding. This was Saturday morning. The counter attack upon the front and flank of our flanking column was made with vigor soon after it had crossed the river, and in accordance with the pl
September 23rd, 1863 AD (search for this): article 4
Gen. Longstreet and his troops. Gen. Longstreet has addressed to his gallant corps the following congratulatory General Order: Headq'rs left wing Army Tenn.,September 23d, 1863. General Orders, No. 2. I. The Lieutenant General commanding expresses his congratulation to the brave troops of this command on the brilliant victory which has crowned their heroic efforts. The enemy, late so defiant and exulting, has been driven from his chosen positions with slaughter, and the loss of artillery, prisoners, arms, and colors. To this glorious result you have contributed no mean share. The gallant troops of the Army of Tennessee have once more exhibited that prowess that has ever illustrated the bloody battle holds of the West, and have fulfilled the high expectations that were entertained for them. Side by side with their brave comrades from Virginia they have breasted the wave of invasion and rolled it back. Soldiers! Much has been done, but not all. The fruits of
September 25th, 1863 AD (search for this): article 1
Further from the battle of the Chickamauga. [from our Own Correspondent.] Army of Tennessee,In front of Chattanooga, Tenn.,September 25th, 1863. There are some additional facts and circumstances connected with the battle of the Chickamauga which deserve to be recorded. The battle field lies on the west bank of West Chickamauga, and is about eight miles from Ringgold, Ga., and about the same distance from Chattanooga, Tenn., being nearly due west from the former and nearly due south from the latter. It is some four miles below the Tennessee line, and is bounded on the west by the Missionary Ridge, (a continuation of Walden's Ridge in Tennessee,) and on the east by the Chickamauga, or "river of blood," as the Indian name implies. Rossville, the former home of John Ross, the celebrated chief of the Cherokees, is two miles north from the battle field, and situated at the foot of a pass in Missionary Ridge. It was in this lovely valley of the Chickamauga, and along these m
January, 7 AD (search for this): article 2
. McKibben, Capt. D. G. Swain, Lieut. M. J. Kelly, and Surgeon Perrin, Medical Inspector, all of Rosecrans's staff. The preliminary arrangements were made conditionally on our part. The Yankee officers were full of chat and anxious to converse but our officers were very reserved. McKibben was formerly a member of Congress from California, and voted upon the Southern side of the Kansas question. Henry Roberts, formerly of Co. K., 26th Tennessee, who deserted at Tullahoma on the 1st of July last, and afterwards enlisted in the enemy's ranks, and was captured at the late battle, lighting against us, was executed this morning for desertion. The whole of Stewart's division was ordered out to witness the execution. The Atlanta Appeal, in an article on the probability of Burnside reaching Rosecrans, says: That he had not effected a junction with Rosecrans up to Sunday evening, appears to be the general belief. We have met a gentleman who left the river, some distanc
February, 7 AD (search for this): article 1
ements could get up? It is said — but with what truth I can not determine — that he acted under the belief that only three Federal corps had advanced up the valley of the Chickamauga, and that the remainder of Rosecrans's army was still on the north side of the Tennessee, near Chattanooga, and that Burnside had not yet formed a junction with the main body. It such was his belief he was deceived, except as to Burnside, as Gen. Lee was at Gettysburg when he supposed, on the morning of the 2d of July, that the whole of Meade's forces had not then arrived. And yet it must be admitted that Gen. Bragg acted wisely in giving battle when and where he did. Delay was full of danger; it might bring heavier reinforcements to his antagonist than any he could count upon. Moreover, Rosecrans was not on his guard, and did not look for an attack from an enemy who he supposed would be only too glad to effect his escape. At one time he was wary and active, combining the cunning of the fox with the
November, 8 AD (search for this): article 7
Acquitted. --Peter Reynolds, charged with stabbing John Burns on the 11th of August, has been examined before a called court of magistrates and acquitted. John A. Fariss, indicted for stealing $250 worth of clothing from John McDonough, has been tried before Judge Lyons and acquitted.
Daniel Adams (search for this): article 3
From the Southwest. Atlanta, Oct. 3--10-12 A. M. --The trains report all quiet before Chattanooga. A species to the Intelligencer, dated the 30th, says: "In the exchange of wounded prisoners to-day we had twenty-five hundred Yankees, and they had forty-one Confederates." Gen. Dan. Adams has determined to remain in the Yankee lines until his condition is so improved as to justify his safe removal. Gov. Brown reached camp to-day, and was enthusiastically cheered by the troops. The enemy still held Knoxville.
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