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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: January 20, 1865., [Electronic resource].

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August, 1 AD (search for this): article 1
ntly passing up the Tennessee river; but heavy rains in Tennessee render the roads impassable for military movements. Miscellaneous. The Toronto Globe, the editor of which is a member of the Canadian Cabinet, and has just returned from England, makes the following statement in its issue of Monday: "We are credibly informed that the best legal opinion in England favors the extradition of the raiders now before the Canadian courts." A letter from Beaufort, South Carolina, dated January 8 says: "The Seventeenth corps (General Blair's) has just arrived, having been nearly the whole week in disembarking, and are now camped about two miles from town." The Louisville Journal learns that the Hon. A. O. P. Nicholson, of Memphis, who was Governor Andrew Johnson's colleague in the United States Senate prior to the war, has returned to his home at Columbia, after a long sojourn within the rebel lines. The National Intelligencer says that the report prevails that Secretary
From Charleston. [Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.] Charleston, January 10, 1865. One is surprised and pained, on returning to Charleston after an absence of twelve months, to find many of the most furious advocates of secession in 1860, as well as many of the most confident and resolute supporters of our holy cause in 1863, now the most querulous, and despondent. The reverses which have overtaken our arms, and the demoralizing influence of the blockade running trade, have wrought this great change, so that the Charleston of to-day is no longer the Charleston of former days. The "cradle of the rebellion," the "hot-bed of secession," as the Yankees were wont to designate the town, and as the Charlestonians themselves were glad to have it designated, no longer presents the bold front with which it entered upon the conflict. I do not mean to insinuate that the people of Charleston are canvassing the propriety of abandoning the contest and of running up the white flag
From Charleston. [Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.] Charleston, January 10, 1865. One is surprised and pained, on returning to Charleston after an absence of twelve months, to find many of the most furious advocates of secession in 1860, as well as many of the most confident and resolute supporters of our holy cause in 1863, now the most querulous, and despondent. The reverses which have overtaken our arms, and the demoralizing influence of the blockade running trade, have wrought this great change, so that the Charleston of to-day is no longer the Charleston of former days. The "cradle of the rebellion," the "hot-bed of secession," as the Yankees were wont to designate the town, and as the Charlestonians themselves were glad to have it designated, no longer presents the bold front with which it entered upon the conflict. I do not mean to insinuate that the people of Charleston are canvassing the propriety of abandoning the contest and of running up the white flag
The New York Millionaires. --A letter from New York says: We are in a fair way of finding out who are the wealthiest men in New York, according to their own affidavits before the internal revenue commissioners. Some of these were specified in my letter of yesterday, and, as a matter of general interest, I append a few more: Income for 1864. A. T. Stewart.$1,843,639 Moses Taylor573,494 Ex-Mayor Opdyke112,800 Judge Roosevelt34,486 August Belmont100,930 W. H. Appleton65,147 Judge Betts.15,030 Ex-Collector Barney30,025 John D. Wolfe57,780 Daniel Drew101,290 Ex-Mayor Kingsland60,000 C. Delmonico70,650 Daniel Parrish62,768 S. L. Mitchell109,324 W. O'Briert.90,000 John O'Brien90,000 Rufus T. Andrews22,616 John Jacob Astor, Jr.20,504 John A. Stevens20,385 J. Sturges135,000 T. M.Taylor105,000 George Law68,444 Jordan L. Mott16,615 All these are in the Sixteenth, Eighteenth and Twenty-second Wards, comprising the Eighth District.
June, 1864 AD (search for this): article 2
The education of disabled soldiers and soldiers children — an important question. Richmond, Va., January 1, 1865. At the annual meeting of the Baptist General Association of Virginia, in June, 1864, the following persons were appointed a committee to provide for the education of the children of deceased and disabled soldiers, namely: Colin Bass, Esq.; Wellington Goddin, Esq.; Rev. A. E. Dickinson, Hon. R. L. Montague, J. B. Jeter, D. D.; J. L. Burrows, D. D.; and W. F. Broaddus, D. D. The committee have matured a plan of operations which, it is hoped, will greatly further the object. They propose, not to originate schools, but to patronize such as now exist, or may hereafter be brought into existence; to limit their efforts, except in special cases, to aid in giving a good English education; and, in making their appropriations, to be controlled by neither sectarian, sectional nor social distinctions. It has been determined also to assist soldiers, disabled in the Confed
October 2nd, 1864 AD (search for this): article 1
o in the country on Government account. It was adopted. Yeas, 43; nays, 31. Mr. Miles, from the Military Committee, reported back the Senate joint resolutions of thanks to General Stand Watie and Colonel Gano, and their officers and men, for brilliant achievements in the Indian Territory. Also, the Senate joint resolution of thanks to Brigadier General John S. Williams, and the officers and men under his command, for the brilliant victory gained by them at Saltville on the 2d of October, 1864, with an amendment making it more comprehensive. Both of which were unanimously adopted. The House passed a Senate bill to regulate the pay of lieutenants of the navy while commanding on shore, giving them the same pay as when on board ship. The Chair announced the following as the Special Committee on the Exchange of Prisoners: Messrs. Marshall, of Kentucky; Perkins, of Louisiana; Gilmer, of North Carolina; Clark, of Missouri, and Funsten, of Virginia. Mr. Branch, of T
December 16th, 1864 AD (search for this): article 1
Post Quartermaster's office,Confederate States of America, Salisbury, North Carolina, Dec. 16, 1864. Negroes Wanted.--This Department wishes to hire, for the ensuing year, four Blacksmiths, two Wheelwrights, Six Carpenters, Seventy Wood-Cutters and Laborers; for which will be paid a liberal price. They will be well fed and supplied with good clothing. Those having able-bodied negro men to hire may find it to their advantage to address. James M. Goodman, Captain and Post Quartermaster. de 21--1m.
December 22nd, 1864 AD (search for this): article 1
Richmond, December 22, 1864. Negroes are not Allowed to pass the Intermediate line of Fortifications without a passport from this office. No passport will be given a slave except on the written order of his owner; and if the handwriting of the owner be not well known at the office or attested properly, the owner must apply for the passport in prison. This by the frequent appearance at the office of forged orders, and will be strictly observed. J. H. Carrington, Provost-Marshal. de 23--1m
January 1st, 1865 AD (search for this): article 2
The education of disabled soldiers and soldiers children — an important question. Richmond, Va., January 1, 1865. At the annual meeting of the Baptist General Association of Virginia, in June, 1864, the following persons were appointed a committee to provide for the education of the children of deceased and disabled soldiers, namely: Colin Bass, Esq.; Wellington Goddin, Esq.; Rev. A. E. Dickinson, Hon. R. L. Montague, J. B. Jeter, D. D.; J. L. Burrows, D. D.; and W. F. Broaddus, D. D. The committee have matured a plan of operations which, it is hoped, will greatly further the object. They propose, not to originate schools, but to patronize such as now exist, or may hereafter be brought into existence; to limit their efforts, except in special cases, to aid in giving a good English education; and, in making their appropriations, to be controlled by neither sectarian, sectional nor social distinctions. It has been determined also to assist soldiers, disabled in the Confed
January 10th, 1865 AD (search for this): article 2
From Charleston. [Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.] Charleston, January 10, 1865. One is surprised and pained, on returning to Charleston after an absence of twelve months, to find many of the most furious advocates of secession in 1860, as well as many of the most confident and resolute supporters of our holy cause in 1863, now the most querulous, and despondent. The reverses which have overtaken our arms, and the demoralizing influence of the blockade running trade, have wrought this great change, so that the Charleston of to-day is no longer the Charleston of former days. The "cradle of the rebellion," the "hot-bed of secession," as the Yankees were wont to designate the town, and as the Charlestonians themselves were glad to have it designated, no longer presents the bold front with which it entered upon the conflict. I do not mean to insinuate that the people of Charleston are canvassing the propriety of abandoning the contest and of running up the white flag
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