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Browsing named entities in Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin).

Found 2,884 total hits in 936 results.

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And the cause of this inconsistency and confusion is that men believe that the office of king is, like that of priest,The priestly office in Greece demanded care in the administration of ritual, but, apart from this, no special competence; it was often hereditary and sometimes filled by lot. one which any man can fill, whereas it is the most important of human functions and demands the greatest wisdom.Now as to each particular course of action, it is the business of those who are at the time associated with a king to advise him how he may handle it in the best way possible, and how he may both preserve what is good and prevent disaster; but as regards a king's conduct in general, I shall attempt to set forth the objects at which he should aim and the pursuits to which he should devote himself.
Cicero (New York, United States) (search for this): speech 2, section 31
Do not think that while all other people should live with sobriety, kings may live with license; on the contrary, let your own self-control stand as an example to the rest, realizing that the manners of the whole state are copied from its rulers.Cf. Isoc. 3.37; Cicero, Ep. ad Fam. i. 9. 12: “quales in republica principles essent, tales reliquos soler esse cives.” Let it be a sign to you that you rule wisely if you see all your subjects growing more prosperous and more temperate because of your oversig
Cicero (New York, United States) (search for this): speech 2, section 33
Keep watch always on your words and actions, that you may fall into as few mistakes as possible. For while it is best to grasp your opportunities at exactly the right moment, yet, since they are difficult to discern, choose to fall short rather than to overreach them;Cf. Artistot. Nic. Eth. 2.5; Cicero, Orat. xxii. : “etsi suus cuique rei modus est, tamen magis offendit nimium quam parum.” for the happy mean is to be found in defect rather than in exce
Speaking, then, of forms of government (for this was the subject I set out to lay before you), I imagine that we all believe that it is altogether monstrousA protest against the new “equality.” Cf. Isoc. 2.14. In Isoc. 7.21-22 Isocrates praises the old democracy of Athens for recognizing ability and worth. that the good and the bad should be thought worthy of the same privileges, and that it is of the very essence of justice that distinctions should be made between them, and that those who are unlike should not be treated alike but should fare and be rewarded in each case according to their d
while men who are permanently in charge of the same duties, even though they fall short of the others in natural ability, at any rate have a great advantage over them in experience. In the next place, the former neglect many things, because each looks to the others to do them; while the latter neglect nothing, knowing that whatever is done depends upon their own efforts. Then again, men who live in oligarchies or democracies are led by their mutual rivalries to injure the commonwealthParty rivalry in the old Athenian democracy was carried on for the good of the state according to Isoc. 4.79. Not so in contemporary Athens, Isoc. 4.167. while those who live in monarchies, not having anyone to envy, do in all circumstances so far as possible what is best.
Phillip (Ohio, United States) (search for this): speech 3, section 19
Furthermore, the former are dilatory in action,See Demosthenes' contrast between the checks and delays which were put upon him as leader of the Athenians and Phillip's freedom to act and strike quickly, Dem. 18.294. Cf. Dem. 4.40-46. for they spend most of their time over their private concerns; and when they do assemble in council, you will find them more often quarrellingFor the selfish bickerings of the platform orators see Isoc. 12.12 with each other than deliberating together; while the latter, for whom no councils or times of meeting are prescribed, but who apply themselves to the state's business both day and night, do not let opportunities pass them by, but act in each case at the right moment.
for, in the first place, we all know that the empire of the Persians attained its great magnitude, not because of the intelligence of the population, but because they more than other peoples respect the royal office; secondly, that Dionysius,Dionysius, the elder, became tyrant of Syracuse in 406 B.C. the tyrant, taking charge of Sicily when the rest of it had been devastated by war and when his own country, Syracuse, was in a state of siege, not only delivered it from the dangers which then threatened, but also made it the greatest of Hellenic states;
for, in the first place, we all know that the empire of the Persians attained its great magnitude, not because of the intelligence of the population, but because they more than other peoples respect the royal office; secondly, that Dionysius,Dionysius, the elder, became tyrant of Syracuse in 406 B.C. the tyrant, taking charge of Sicily when the rest of it had been devastated by war and when his own country, Syracuse, was in a state of siege, not only delivered it from the dangers which then threatened, but also made it the greatest of Hellenic states;
that the empire of the Persians attained its great magnitude, not because of the intelligence of the population, but because they more than other peoples respect the royal office; secondly, that Dionysius,Dionysius, the elder, became tyrant of Syracuse in 406 B.C. the tyrant, taking charge of Sicily when the rest of it had been devastated by war and when his own country, Syracuse, was in a state of siege, not only delivered it from the dangers which then threatened, but also made it the greate Persians attained its great magnitude, not because of the intelligence of the population, but because they more than other peoples respect the royal office; secondly, that Dionysius,Dionysius, the elder, became tyrant of Syracuse in 406 B.C. the tyrant, taking charge of Sicily when the rest of it had been devastated by war and when his own country, Syracuse, was in a state of siege, not only delivered it from the dangers which then threatened, but also made it the greatest of Hellenic states;
Aegospotami (Turkey) (search for this): speech 3, section 24
and again, we know that while the Carthaginians and the Lacedaemonians, who are the best governed peoples of the world,Socrates and his followers idealized, in contrast to the slackness of Athens, the rigorous rule of such states as Sparta and Crete. See, for example, Plat. Crito 52e. Aristotle couples in his praise, as Isocrates here, the Spartans and the Carthaginians: Aristot. Pol. 1272b 24 ff. are ruled by oligarchies at home, yet, when they take the field, they are ruled by kings. One might also point out that the stateAthens. which more than any other abhors absolute rule meets with disaster when it sends out many generals,As in the disasters at Syracuse and Aegospotami. and with success when it wages war under a single leader.
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