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Newton (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
Gen. Jones has recently been appointed commandant of the Department of South Georgia and Florida, with headquarters at Tallahassee. It was nearly eleven o'clock before they got off. Mr. Robert Bacon says he met them on their way, and they told him ey told us that a dispatch had just been received stating that the Yanks have landed at St. Mark's and are marching on Tallahassee. We first heard they were 4,000 strong, but before we reached the depot, their numbers had swelled to 15,000. Mard all our writing back and forth is at cross purposes. The latest news is that the Yankees have whipped our forces at Tallahassee, but the waters are so high and communication so uncertain that one never knows what to believe. At any rate, I shallraiders at Thomasville. They must have thought us fools indeed, to believe that the enemy could come all the way from Tallahassee or Savannah to Thomasville, without our hearing a word of it till they got there, but we pretended to swallow it all,
France (France) (search for this): chapter 3
he captain keeps him out of the stockade, feeds and clothes him, and in return, reaps the benefit of his skill. Peter is a French Yankee, Everybody that fought in the Union army was classed by us as a Yankee, whether Southern Union men, foreigners, or negroes; hence the expressions Irish Yankee, Dutch Yankee, black Yankee, etc., in contradistinction to the Simon-pure native product, the Yankee par excellence. a shoemaker by trade, and makes as beautiful shoes as I ever saw imported from France. My heart quite softened towards him when I saw his handiwork, and little Mrs. Sims was so overcome that she gave him a huge slice of her Confederate fruit cake. I talked French with him, which pleased him greatly, and Mett and I engaged him to make us each a pair of shoes. I will feel like a lady once more, with good shoes on my feet. I expect the poor Yank is glad to get away from Anderson on any terms. Although matters have improved somewhat with the cool weather, the tales that are
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
n to go away. I never was so tired and sleepy in my life, and cold, too, for we had let the fire go out as a hint. When at last we went to our room I nearly died laughing at the way Metta had maneuvered to save time. She had loosened every button and string that she could get at without being seen, while sitting in the parlor, and had now only to give herself a good shake and she was ready for bed. We spent the morning making calls with Mrs. Sims, and found among the refugees from South Carolina a charming old lady, Mrs. Brisbane. Though past fifty, she is prettier than many a woman of half her years, and her manners would grace a court. Her father was an artist of note, and she showed us some beautiful pictures painted by him. After dinner we enjoyed some Florida oranges sent by Clinton Spenser, and they tasted very good, in the absence of West India fruits. Jan. 25, Wednesday Dined at Judge Vason's, where there was a large company. He is very hospitable and his hous
Pine Bluff (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
taken up their abode there. Jan. 1st, 1865. Sunday. Pine Bluff A beautiful clear day, but none of us went to church. Sims, if we are not all water-bound in the meantime, at Pine Bluff. The floods are subsiding up the country, but the waterol which the dear, pious little soul proposes to open at Pine Bluff after the manner of Hannah More. At one place, where thFriday We had expected to bring Miss Pyncheon out to Pine Bluff with us, but Mrs. Butler had the only vacant seat in theple that I want to see. March 2, Thursday We left Pine Bluff at eleven o'clock and reached the Blue Spring in time fonveyances for Gopher Hill. It is worth the journey from Pine Bluff to Gopher Hill just to travel over the road between therat have disorganized everything. He promised to stop at Pine Bluff on his way down, and give us the news. Then Uncle Aby gaturday There was fooling and counter fooling between Pine Bluff and Gum Pond all day. Jim Chiles and Albert Bacon began
Montgomery (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
tures over me, and said he never was so delighted with anybody in his life, so it seems the attraction was mutual. I have a letter from Tolie; she is living in Montgomery, supremely happy, of course, as a bride should be. She was sadly disappointed at my absence from the wedding. The city is very gay, she says, and everybody inqng accounts of terrible floods all over the country Three bridges are washed away on the Montgomery & West Point R. R., so that settles the question of going to Montgomery for the present. Our fears about the Yankees are quieted, too, there being none this side of the Altamaha, and the swamps impassable. Jan. 14th, Saturday t off years ago, but for the blockade. I wore a white barred organdy with a black lace flounce round the bottom that completely hid the rents made at dances in Montgomery last winter, and a wide black lace bow and ends in the back, to match the flounce. Handsome lace will make almost anything look respectable, and I thank my st
Washington, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
er (also called in the diary, Mrs. Green Butler) the widow of Mr. Greenlee Butler, who had died not long before in the army. He was the elder and only brother of my sister's husband. Col. Maxwell, of Gopher Hill, was an uncle of my brother-in-law, the owner of several large plantations, where he was fond of practicing the oldtime Southern hospitality. The Cousin Bolling so frequently mentioned, was Dr. Bolling A. Pope, a stepson of my mother's youngest sister, Mrs. Alexander Pope, of Washington, Ga., the Aunt Cornelia spoken of in a later chapter. He was in Berlin when the war began, where he had spent several years preparing himself as a specialist in diseases of the eye and ear, but returned when hostilities began, and was assigned to duty as a surgeon. The Tallassee Plantation to which reference is made, was an estate owned by my father near Albany, Ga., where the family were in the habit of spending the winters, until he sold it and transferred his principal planting interes
Americus (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
famously. There is a party at Mr. Callaway's from Americus, which makes the neighborhood very gay. Everybody erybody else. Merrill has married Katy Furlow, of Americus, and she says that soon after my journey home lastre in Albany-Mett, Mrs. Meals, and I-on our way to Americus, where I am going to consult Cousin Bolling Pope a up very early to catch the seven o'clock train to Americus. Jim met us at the depot, though there were so mage Lawton sat by me all the way from Smithville to Americus, and insisted on our paying his family a visit befs, we would never get back home again. We reached Americus at ten and went straight to Cousin Bolling's hospr. Baldwin. March 8, Wednesday I went up to Americus yesterday, with Flora and Capt. Rust, to see Cousiand I had nothing for it but to spend the night in Americus and kill the time as best we could. I was repaid ren. The day Cousin Bolling was first expected in Americus with his bride, Flora went to town to put the hous
Flint (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
bringing dear little Mrs. Sims with her. Metta and I are to spend next week in Albany with Mrs. Sims, if we are not all water-bound in the meantime, at Pine Bluff. The floods are subsiding up the country, but the waters are raging down here. Flint River is out of its banks, the low grounds are overflowed, and the backwater has formed a lake between the negro quarter and the house, that reaches to within a few yards of the door. So much the better for us, as Kilpatrick and his raiders can nevidence,--and Providence and Uncle Aby between them brought us through in safety. At some places in the woods, sheets of water full half a mile wide and from one to two feet deep were running across the road, on their way to swell the flood in Flint River. Sister sent a negro before us on a mule to see if the water-courses were passable. We had several bad scares, but reached town in safety a little after dark. Jan. 22. The rains returned with double fury in the night and continued al
Memphis (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
gs, but curiosity got the better of us, and so we agreed to go home with him. He is occupying Col. Maxwell's house while the family are on the plantation in Lee county. When we reached the house with Cousin Bolling, Mrs. Pope-or Cousin Bessie, as she says we must call her now, made us feel easy by sending for us to come to her bedroom, as there was no fire in the parlor, and she would not make company of us. She was a Mrs. Ayres, before her marriage to Cousin Bolling, a young widow from Memphis, Tenn., and very prominent in society there. She is quite handsome, and, having just come from beyond the lines, her beautiful dresses were a revelation to us dowdy Confederates, and made me feel like a plucked peacock. Her hair was arranged in three rolls over the top of the head, on each side of the part, in the style called cats, rats, and mice, on account of the different size of the rolls, the top one being the largest. It was very stylish. I wish my hair was long enough to dress that
West Indies (search for this): chapter 3
ood shake and she was ready for bed. We spent the morning making calls with Mrs. Sims, and found among the refugees from South Carolina a charming old lady, Mrs. Brisbane. Though past fifty, she is prettier than many a woman of half her years, and her manners would grace a court. Her father was an artist of note, and she showed us some beautiful pictures painted by him. After dinner we enjoyed some Florida oranges sent by Clinton Spenser, and they tasted very good, in the absence of West India fruits. Jan. 25, Wednesday Dined at Judge Vason's, where there was a large company. He is very hospitable and his house is always full of people. Albert Bacon came in from Gum Pond and called in the afternoon, bringing letters, and the letters brought permission to remain in South-West Georgia as long as we please, the panic about Kilpatrick having died out. I would like to be at home now, if the journey were not such a hard one. Garnett and Mrs. Elzey are both there, and Mary Da
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