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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. Search the whole document.

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United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 21
thern frontier of the Confederacy that the United States had massed its armies, and hither had floced occupation of a part of Kentucky by the United States, and the preparations which manifest the iention of their Government to invade the Confederate States through that territory, has imposed it ohat the motives of the Government of the Confederate States in taking this step should be fully knowtern Department of the army of the Confederate States of America, do proclaim that these States havncies of self-defense on the part of the Confederate States. These States intend to conform to all desire to unite their fortunes with the Confederate States, to whom they are already bound by so maty of those people desire to adhere to the United States and become parties to the War, then none cion of a like intention on the part of the United States. by order of the President of the ConfConfederate States of America: A. S. Johnston, General of the Western Department of the army of the Con[2 more...]
Fort Donelson (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
. Any orders of your Excellency will be executed promptly, and any suggestions you may make will be received with pleasure. With great respect, your obedient servant, A. S. Johnston, General C. S. A. His Excellency Jefferson Davis. A few days prior to Buckner's movement, General Felix K. Zollicoffer, in accordance with arrangements previously made, advanced to Cumberland Ford with about four thousand men. In the west, Feliciana, thirty miles east of Columbus, Fort Henry, Fort Donelson, and Hopkinsville, were garrisoned with small bodies of troops; and the territory between Columbus and Bowling Green was occupied by moving detachments, which created a vague apprehension of military force and projected enterprises. These dispositions gave the Confederates, when Bowling Green was occupied, an angular base, with its extremities at Columbus and Cumberland Ford, and its salient at Bowling Green. The passes of the Cumberland Mountains into Southwest Virginia, also committe
Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
, from the crests of the Alleghanies to their Western foot-hills, and the creation of a disloyal and hostile section, severing the East from the West, and converting the Gibraltar of the South into a stronghold for its foes. a line from the mouth of the Big Sandy River, where West Virginia, Ohio, and Kentucky corner, to Bowling Green, roughly indicates the Western edge of this Union district. But a belt of country through Western Kentucky and Tennessee, from the Ohio River to the State of Mississippi, was also full of Unionists ; and, indeed, in all Western Kentucky county was set against county, and every house was divided against itself. The whole land was become a debatable ground. The chief Confederate element, however, was contained in a narrow district along the Ohio River, fifty or sixty miles wide, almost isolated from the South, and surrounded by hostile regions. Wealthy and slaveholding, this population was much demoralized by the course of events and by Federal milit
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
ecurity against disaster. I feel assured that I can command the requisite number of men, but we are deficient in arms. By letter of the 15th instant, borne by a special messenger, I have called earnestly upon the Governors of Georgia and Alabama for arms which I am assured they possess. If I fail with them, I shall appeal to your Excellency for your support and assistance. I believe that those States have quite a number of arms, and that a portion, at least, of them ought to be sparednfluence was, and what an element of weakness it became to the Confederacy on General Johnston's line. the Alleghany Mountains and their Western side-ranges form a huge quadrangle, extending from Pennsylvania southwestwardly into Georgia and Alabama, and embracing Western Virginia, East Tennessee, and Eastern Kentucky. Its population, the overflow by emigration of the poorer classes of Virginia and North Carolina, was rude, hardy, and ignorant. A sort of clanship, based on association and
Paducah (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
detail. The occupation of Columbus by General Polk has already been related. This, and the simultaneous seizure of Paducah by General Grant, opposing two hostile armies on the soil of Kentucky, had ended the supposed neutrality of that State. wling Green at once. Information I believe to be reliable has just been received that General Polk has advanced upon Paducah with 7,500 men. The indications are distinct leading to the conclusion that the enemy design to advance on the Nashville Rivers by forts at Donelson and Henry will be given in detail hereafter. General Grant had possession of Smithland and Paducah, at their mouths. Indeed, the outlets and navigable waters of all the Rivers of Kentucky, the Sandy, Licking, Kentucky,was less than 20,000 men. General Fremont reports that he had, September 14, 1861, at and near Cairo, 12,831 men, and at Paducah, 7,791 men; together, 20,622 men, under General U. S. Grant. report on the conduct of the War, part III., p. 41. in t
Columbus, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
, or be destroyed in detail. The occupation of Columbus by General Polk has already been related. This, aawn. It is not possible to withdraw them now from Columbus in the west and from Cumberland Ford in the east, men. In the west, Feliciana, thirty miles east of Columbus, Fort Henry, Fort Donelson, and Hopkinsville, were small bodies of troops; and the territory between Columbus and Bowling Green was occupied by moving detachmenoccupied, an angular base, with its extremities at Columbus and Cumberland Ford, and its salient at Bowling Grfensive works in progress at different points from Columbus to Memphis might be expected to defy this fresh-wa River, was a good position for defense. Thus, as Columbus and the Cumberland Mountains had become the extremble, by the three corps already mentioned: Polk at Columbus, Buckner at Bowling Green, and Zollicoffer at Cumbrders no. 2.headquarters, Western Department, Columbus, Kentucky, September 26, 1861. The following officer
Cumberland River (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
a source of great weakness to the Confederacy. The converging currents of so many Rivers, uniting at Cairo in one great flood, enabled the United States Government to collect flotillas of gunboats, which searched out every navigable stream, and overawed communities unaccustomed to War. The line of defensive works in progress at different points from Columbus to Memphis might be expected to defy this fresh-water navy; but the River system of Kentucky itself was tributary to the North. The Cumberland and the Tennessee Rivers, rising in the Alleghanies, flow first southwest, and thence by sharp bends to the North, traversing respectively the northern and Southern portions of Tennessee, and finally emptying close together into the Ohio near its mouth. The history of the attempt to defend these Rivers by forts at Donelson and Henry will be given in detail hereafter. General Grant had possession of Smithland and Paducah, at their mouths. Indeed, the outlets and navigable waters of all
Indiana (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
ed by Lieutenant-Colonel R. W. Johnson, under General W. T. Sherman, at Muldrough's Hill, to whom he also sent, within a week, the Sixth, Thirty-eighth, and Thirty-ninth Indiana regiments, the Forty-ninth Ohio Regiment, and the Twenty-fourth Illinois Regiment (not less than 3,000 men), making over 6,000 effectives in all. history of the army of the Cumberland, vol. I., p. 29. General Thomas had at camp Dick Robinson four Kentucky, two East Tennessee, and several regiments from Ohio and Indiana; Ibid., vol. I., pp. 21-37. probably 6,000 men. He had also a large auxiliary force of home Guards, useful to protect roads and keep the disloyal element in awe. General William Nelson had six regiments of infantry, besides cavalry and artillery, at and near Maysville, probably 4,000 men. Ibid., vol. I., pp. 74, 75. here we have 34,000 volunteers; and, with home Guards, probably over 40,000 troops. to oppose this force General Johnston had, available under Polk, 11,000 troops (
Chattanooga (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
r 14th, and on the same day determined to seize Bowling Green. He placed General S. B. Buckner in charge of the column of advance, telegraphing to Richmond for his appointment as brigadier-general, which was made next day, September 15th. The grounds of his intended movement were given by General Johnston to the President, the day before it was made, in the following letter: Nashville, Tennessee, September 16, 1861. Mr. President: Your dispatch of the 13th instant was received at Chattanooga. After full conference with Governor Harris, and after learning the facts, political and military, I am satisfied that the political bearing of the question presented for my decision has been decided by the Legislature of Kentucky. The Legislature of Kentucky has required the prompt removal of all Confederate forces from her soil, and the Governor of Kentucky has issued his proclamation to that effect. The troops will not be withdrawn. It is not possible to withdraw them now from Colu
Maysville, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
n 3,000 men), making over 6,000 effectives in all. history of the army of the Cumberland, vol. I., p. 29. General Thomas had at camp Dick Robinson four Kentucky, two East Tennessee, and several regiments from Ohio and Indiana; Ibid., vol. I., pp. 21-37. probably 6,000 men. He had also a large auxiliary force of home Guards, useful to protect roads and keep the disloyal element in awe. General William Nelson had six regiments of infantry, besides cavalry and artillery, at and near Maysville, probably 4,000 men. Ibid., vol. I., pp. 74, 75. here we have 34,000 volunteers; and, with home Guards, probably over 40,000 troops. to oppose this force General Johnston had, available under Polk, 11,000 troops (estimated); under Buckner, 4,000 men; and under Zollicoffer, 4,000 more. The whole force in Zollicoffer's district of East Tennessee consisted nominally of ten regiments of infantry, seventeen companies of cavalry, and a six-gun battery of six-pounders; but only five regi
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