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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. Search the whole document.

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Austin (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
r party, as afterward appeared. It was reported to him by gentlemen of unimpeached veracity that General Houston had spoken of him in violent and disrespectful terms. The following correspondence ensued, upon which comment is needless: City of Austin, January 5, 1840. Sir: I have just been informed that on last evening, and also on this morning, you thought it necessary to use the most vituperative language with regard to me, for what cause I know not. In doing so you bore in mind the resptime sought to gratify this wish for the tranquillity of domestic life; but the call of public duty had still held him to his post. The following letter, written under these emotions, will serve to explain this phase of feeling: City of Austin, Texan republic, October 24, 1839. dear friend: I am very sorry to learn that you have suffered so much from sickness this summer. We have, the most sagacious of us, but little ken of the future. When we went together to Galveston, you expressed gre
Texas (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
phetic reply. history of annexation schemes. Texas enters the American Union. marriage to Miss E having become warmly enlisted in the cause of Texas, his nature, which could not rest satisfied wipurpose of establishing himself as a farmer in Texas, it was necessary for General Johnston to rais, he returned to Kentucky, and was absent from Texas a year. Part of the summer of 1841 he spent ant prospects of redress. Yoakum, History of Texas, vol. II., p. 354. General Johnston was otion of the entire affair: To the people of Texas. Galveston, May 6, 1842. my name having beetaining with suitable implements immigrants to Texas, and who represent the preparation in this rep in producing the result. The liberties which Texas had achieved by the sword had received the sanress consented to the terms of annexation, and Texas became a, State of the American Union. It hatever sacrifice. After the annexation of Texas, in 1845, his friends sought to have him appoi[27 more...]
Galveston (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
ittle ken of the future. When we went together to Galveston, you expressed great concern for me when I announct to Louisville for this purpose, but came back to Galveston during the summer on business. In November, 1840, course. General Johnston being at the time in Galveston, the President could have ascertained the truth, bn of the entire affair: To the people of Texas. Galveston, May 6, 1842. my name having been used in a proation for it in fact. A. Sidney Johnston. City of Galveston, May 1, 1842. sir: your proclamation, which apps, Witnesses. J. S. Sydnor. Executive Department, Galveston, May 2, 1842. Sir: Your note of yesterday's dat to the market, being about thirty-five miles from Galveston by land, and twelve miles from the navigable waterre nearest to his heart was Colonel James Love, of Galveston. Love was six or eight years his senior, and had om the mountains of Kentucky, whence he removed to Galveston soon after the Revolution of 1836. He was a man o
Los Angeles (California, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
Union. It is now necessary to recur to General Johnston's private life. During his visits to Kentucky he had formed an attachment for a young lady of great beauty, talents, and accomplishments, Miss Eliza Griffin. Miss Griffin was the sister of Captain George H. Griffin, U. S. A., an aide of General Taylor, who died in the Florida War; of Lieutenant William P. Griffin, who died in the navy; and of Dr. John S. Griffin, long an army-surgeon, but now for many years a resident of Los Angeles, California. They were all men of mark, physically, mentally, and morally. Miss Griffin was cousin to General Johnston's first wife, and the niece and ward of Mr. George Hancock, in whose family he had long enjoyed entire intimacy. There was some disparity of years, but his uncommon youthfulness of temperament and appearance diminished the inequality. After some delay, principally on account of the unsettled state of his business, they were married October 3, 1843, at Lynch's Station, near
Yucatan (Yucatan, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 9
try. The letter of Dr. Turner (a copy of which you inclose me) has no relevancy to the facts so far as you may be concerned. It will give me great pleasure in this trying crisis of our national existence to receive the cooperation of all true patriots who are capable of rendering effectual service to our common country. Your obedient servant, Sam Houston. To General A. S. Johnston. President Houston had adopted the policy of undoing whatever had been attempted by his predecessor. Yucatan, which, aided by the Texan navy, had employed so much of the energies of Mexico, was abandoned to the conquering sword of Santa Anna. Treaties were substituted for militia as a defense against the Indians, who had, however, been too severely punished to be troublesome for some time, and were glad of a breathing-spell. The transportation of the mails had entirely ceased; and the revenue derived from direct taxation scarcely paid the expense of collection. The volunteers, who were scouting
Newport (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
ve service. Accordingly, he resigned in February, 1840. In order to give definite shape to his purpose of establishing himself as a farmer in Texas, it was necessary for General Johnston to raise the means by selling his real estate elsewhere. After his resignation he went to Louisville for this purpose, but came back to Galveston during the summer on business. In November, 1840, he returned to Kentucky, and was absent from Texas a year. Part of the summer of 1841 he spent at Newport, Rhode Island, and other agreeable places on the Atlantic coast, in charge of some young relations. During General Johnston's absence in December, 1841, President Lamar's health became so bad that he vacated his office, leaving the Administration in the hands of Vice-President Burnet. In the following spring the names of a good many gentlemen were canvassed in view of the presidency, but finally the struggle was narrowed down to a contest between Houston and Burnet. Judge Burnet, in spite of
Shelbyville, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
a. They were all men of mark, physically, mentally, and morally. Miss Griffin was cousin to General Johnston's first wife, and the niece and ward of Mr. George Hancock, in whose family he had long enjoyed entire intimacy. There was some disparity of years, but his uncommon youthfulness of temperament and appearance diminished the inequality. After some delay, principally on account of the unsettled state of his business, they were married October 3, 1843, at Lynch's Station, near Shelbyville, Kentucky, the home of Mr. Hancock. It may be remembered that, when General Johnston retired from the War Office, it was his intention to engage in agricultural pursuits. In partnership with a friend, he purchased the China Grove plantation, in Brazoria County, Texas. General Johnston describes it thus: It consists of 1,500 acres of cotton-land, between 300 and 400 acres cleared, with gin, fences, etc.; and 4,428 acres of rich prairie, affording fine grass for stock, and every way more su
Clay Davis (search for this): chapter 9
gainst Mexico, on an expedition of retaliation which culminated in the disaster at Mier. General Johnston's friends continued to urge him to re-enter public life. During his absence from Texas, in 1843, he was continually assured by his correspondents that, if he would come forward for the presidency, Rusk, Burleson, and Lipscomb, then the three most prominent candidates, would unite their influence for him. Dr. Starr, in 1844, spoke of him as the only man suited for the presidency. Clay Davis wrote that nine-tenths of the voters of the west wanted him for President. The narrowness of his private fortune forced him to refuse to enter the lists. Love, urging him strongly to return to Texas, in 1844, he replied: My fortunes are such that I am determined to remain in Kentucky for the present, or until my affairs wear a brighter complexion, unless the men of Texas are needed for her defense. In that event I will not, if alive, fail to be with you. Seventeen years later he crosse
J. S. Sydnor (search for this): chapter 9
t I made to the President of the Republic of Texas, concerning the appointing power as emanating from General Johnston as proffered by the Texas commissioners in the United States, have a tendency to cast blame on them, it was foreign from my design. The only power that they seemed to convey was recommendation for promotion, and my impression was that it was by the Government authority. Yours, respectfully, William O. Turner. To General A. S. Johnston. George B. Jones, Witnesses. J. S. Sydnor. Executive Department, Galveston, May 2, 1842. Sir: Your note of yesterday's date, disclaiming any illegal acts against this Government, or any participation in or knowledge of the conduct of certain persons who, in the United States, are representing themselves as the agents of certain committees of vigilance in this country, acting in entire independency of the constituted authorities of the country, and who, it has been represented to the Executive, are offering to grant commission
Santa Anna (search for this): chapter 9
t will give me great pleasure in this trying crisis of our national existence to receive the cooperation of all true patriots who are capable of rendering effectual service to our common country. Your obedient servant, Sam Houston. To General A. S. Johnston. President Houston had adopted the policy of undoing whatever had been attempted by his predecessor. Yucatan, which, aided by the Texan navy, had employed so much of the energies of Mexico, was abandoned to the conquering sword of Santa Anna. Treaties were substituted for militia as a defense against the Indians, who had, however, been too severely punished to be troublesome for some time, and were glad of a breathing-spell. The transportation of the mails had entirely ceased; and the revenue derived from direct taxation scarcely paid the expense of collection. The volunteers, who were scouting along the Rio Grande, were disbanded; so that the frontier was now left not only without the means of protection but of warning.
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