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Browsing named entities in a specific section of An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps.. Search the whole document.

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Yazoo River (United States) (search for this): chapter 40
e rebel ram Arkansas she forces the mouth of the Yazoo river, and runs the gauntlet of the fleet night bombars above town and on high grounds at the mouth of the Yazoo, a few miles above Vicksburgh, we could plainly see Lynch and a few young naval officers were up the Yazoo River, preparing a little surprise for them. Having blteamed up the Mississippi, and had run far up the Yazoo River, and were then under the orders of Commodore Lync fleet at Milliken's Bend, to watch the mouth of the Yazoo; and to be ready for any emergency, they kept up steand citizens, fitting out the ram Arkansas in the Yazoo River. The name of this stream literally means River and iron-clads watching for her at the mouth of the Yazoo, or drawn up in parallel lines to receive her when psoon appear to oppose his exit from the mouth of the Yazoo; so, although using more steam than could be generatd perceive two powerful gunboats at the mouth of the Yazoo, which, like ants, were dragging their crippled comp
Shiloh, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
d out at discretion! Much comment, too, has been made in our army regarding this movement; it took the Confederacy by surprise; opinions differ materially, and it is said that the War Office blames Beauregard for allowing himself to be driven to any such necessity. I doubt this report, but let us reason the matter a little, though I am not aware of the opinions formed by military critics in Virginia regarding it. First. Why did B. fall back upon Corinth and fortify it, after the defeat at Shiloh? To protect communication by the two main roads intersecting there. Second. Was that object accomplished, or could he have done so by remaining there? No; the fall of Memphis gave all the roads north of Corinth to the enemy; they approached and threatened B.'s left along the western branch of the Mobile and Columbus road, which was unavoidable, and were manoeuvring on his right to gain the eastern section; Corinth was indefensible, and by falling back he protected the southern branches
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
as a wretched site for a camp, utterly destitute of water, good or bad, and what little could be obtained was scooped up from the sand, or from pools fed by occasional rains. You are acquainted with the place, having camped here before going to Virginia; and you know, although there were at that time not more than ten thousand men here, the water was so bad that many gave ten cents a gallon for such as they could get from an indifferent well at the hotel. Except to keep open the railroad traffially, and it is said that the War Office blames Beauregard for allowing himself to be driven to any such necessity. I doubt this report, but let us reason the matter a little, though I am not aware of the opinions formed by military critics in Virginia regarding it. First. Why did B. fall back upon Corinth and fortify it, after the defeat at Shiloh? To protect communication by the two main roads intersecting there. Second. Was that object accomplished, or could he have done so by remaining
Athens, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
ll, combined under command of Halleck, were slowly advancing. It was reported that they swarmed over the country like locusts, eating or destroying every thing, carrying off property, capturing negroes, and impressing them into service. As a specimen of the behavior of Federal troops in the West and South, I subjoin the following from their own organs: The Louisville (Kentucky) Democrat, which for safety was printed over the Ohio River at New-Albany, thus speaks of their soldiery in Athens, Alabama: General Turchin said to his soldiers that he would shut his eyes for two hours, and let them loose upon the town and citizens of Athens — the very same citizens who, when all the rest of the State was disloyal, nailed the national colors to the highest pinnacle of their court-house cupola. These citizens, to a wonderful degree true to their allegiance, had their houses and stores broken open, and robbed of every thing valuable; and, what was too unwieldy to be transported easily, was
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
to harmless citizens. Driving in our pickets, they had occupied the northern end of the New-Orleans and Memphis Railroad; they had also seized Memphis, sunk our little improvised fleet of gunboats there, after a noble fight, in which we inflicted considerable loss; had pushed along the Charleston and Mississippi Railroad, the west end of which they occupied; and had camped about three miles from Corinth. This was a startling position for us truly! Our main railroad communication with Richmond, via Chattanooga, in the enemy's possession, and we obliged to travel many hundred miles round by way of Mobile, Alabama, and Georgia, to keep the communication open! As there are but two lines of railroad, both had been taxed to the utmost before this disaster. What could we do with but one, while the enemy had several outlets by land and river communication as well for advance as supplies? To add to our misfortunes, Corinth was a wretched site for a camp, utterly destitute of water, go
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
during the war, being the only safe crossing-place for us. Thousands of men, supplies, and materiel were continually passing to and fro-much of our provisions for the armies in the East and West being derived from Texas, parts of Louisiana, and Arkansas. In short, could the enemy silence our batteries and seize the town, all the agricultural products of the Northern and Western States would pass down unmolested to the Gulf; the enemy would gain free access to the whole river front, supply them, several vessels appeared before our upper batteries, and the engagement opened with great fury. While the bluff batteries were contending with most of the fleet, several of Farragut's squadron ran past, and opened with an awful roar upon the-Arkansas, lying broadside to shore; while several boats from below engaged our guns south of the town. Although the night was quite dark, so frequent and rapid were the flashes of the guns on both sides that every thing was distinctly visible. The nois
Island Number Ten (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
id. day. Their troops were landed from transports, but never came within view. From scouts, who volunteered as spies, we ascertained that they had seized hundreds of negroes in that part of Louisiana, and were actually digging a canal from Milliken's Bend across the peninsula, which, it was hoped, would divert the waters of the river from its proper bed, and leave Vicksburgh Sigh and dry as an inland city! The idea was a bold one, and originated with General Pope, who, not able to pass Island no.10 some months before, dug a canal across a small peninsula near New-Madrid, in Missouri, and got safely in the rear of the island, and captured it. The present undertaking, however, did not promise like results; for the stream was strong, and would not be diverted. Hundreds of men, both whites and blacks, sank and died under the labor of cutting this canal, before the attempt was discontinued. And still the bombardment progressed. Thousands of shell, round shot, and other missiles wer
New Orleans (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
But to return to my narrative: We had scarcely arrived at Tullahoma ere it was known that Farragut's fleet from New-Orleans, and Foote's from the Upper Mississippi, were approaching, to unite against the batteries at Vicksburgh — the only towmpted to reenforce Fort Sumter at the beginning of the war, had been captured by us off the Gulf Coast, and taken into New-Orleans; but when Farragut took that city, this, with some three or four other sea-vessels, and a fleet of magnificent Southerlthough several small steam sea-vessels, and a magnificent fleet of river passenger and freight boats had escaped from New-Orleans, and were far inland, up the Yazoo, they were not safe. Naval officers knew the enemy would soon visit the mouth of tVan Dorn says the enemy admit a great loss among them from various causes, and are afraid the Arkansas may run down to New-Orleans and play havoc among them there I Four gunboats are disabled, two sunk, and several others require expensive repairs.
Chattanooga (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
zens. Driving in our pickets, they had occupied the northern end of the New-Orleans and Memphis Railroad; they had also seized Memphis, sunk our little improvised fleet of gunboats there, after a noble fight, in which we inflicted considerable loss; had pushed along the Charleston and Mississippi Railroad, the west end of which they occupied; and had camped about three miles from Corinth. This was a startling position for us truly! Our main railroad communication with Richmond, via Chattanooga, in the enemy's possession, and we obliged to travel many hundred miles round by way of Mobile, Alabama, and Georgia, to keep the communication open! As there are but two lines of railroad, both had been taxed to the utmost before this disaster. What could we do with but one, while the enemy had several outlets by land and river communication as well for advance as supplies? To add to our misfortunes, Corinth was a wretched site for a camp, utterly destitute of water, good or bad, and
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
of men, supplies, and materiel were continually passing to and fro-much of our provisions for the armies in the East and West being derived from Texas, parts of Louisiana, and Arkansas. In short, could the enemy silence our batteries and seize the town, all the agricultural products of the Northern and Western States would pass dad not more than twenty guns, and our artillerists were mere novices. They were eager for the fun, however, and were ably supported by some splendid troops from Louisiana, Kentucky, and Mississippi, who would rather fight than eat. The women seemed to have changed their feminine natures; they wished every building crushed to powdnded from transports, but never came within view. From scouts, who volunteered as spies, we ascertained that they had seized hundreds of negroes in that part of Louisiana, and were actually digging a canal from Milliken's Bend across the peninsula, which, it was hoped, would divert the waters of the river from its proper bed, and
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