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Arkansas (United States) (search for this): chapter 17
e field very soon after our troops crossed Cabin Creek, and to have swam Grand River, some seven or eight miles to the southeast. Several other detachments attempted to swim the river at other points. If the enemy could have detained our troops and train at Cabin Creek another day, General Cabell would probably have been able to cross Grand River with his force, and to have joined in the engagement. After the rout of the enemy, it is not believed that they made a halt north of the Arkansas river, so much were they demoralized. We may now glance a moment over the field at the casualties. I have already mentioned the wounding of Major Foreman; and of the cavalry under him, there were four enlisted men killed, ten wounded and eight missing. Captain Stewart's company C, Ninth Kansas cavalry, had one man killed, three wounded slightly, and one seriously. Colonel Williams' colored regiment had one officer and twelve enlisted men wounded. Three of the colored soldiers were morta
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
a dash on the enemy's camp. The rebel pickets on Sunday, 28th instant, stated that they had just heard that the Confederate army in the east, under General Lee, has recently gained a great victory over the Federal army, and that our army has fallen back to the immediate vicinity of Washington. They also stated that General Lee is preparing for another invasion of Maryland, and intends entering Pennsylvania with the army of Northern Virginia, with the view of capturing Philadelphia and Baltimore. Though, in our isolation here, news from the East is a long time reaching us, yet that which comes shows that both the Federal and Confederate armies are displaying great activity, and that a great conflict is imminent. The loss of a great battle now, or the capture by the enemy of either of the large cities above mentioned, would be extremely damaging to our cause, and I know that thousands of loyal hearts are trembling in regard to the impending result. Our defeat would encourage the
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 17
ir baggage trains at Elk Creek by signals, so that they could be moving south, several hours before we could reach that point. The troops of this division, however, are too busily engaged elsewhere to make a dash on the enemy's camp. The rebel pickets on Sunday, 28th instant, stated that they had just heard that the Confederate army in the east, under General Lee, has recently gained a great victory over the Federal army, and that our army has fallen back to the immediate vicinity of Washington. They also stated that General Lee is preparing for another invasion of Maryland, and intends entering Pennsylvania with the army of Northern Virginia, with the view of capturing Philadelphia and Baltimore. Though, in our isolation here, news from the East is a long time reaching us, yet that which comes shows that both the Federal and Confederate armies are displaying great activity, and that a great conflict is imminent. The loss of a great battle now, or the capture by the enemy of e
Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
supply train is coming another rebel force gone to meet the Federal supply train movements of the Confederate armies in the east as reported by rebel pickets Vicksburg closely invested by General Grant Federal troops in southwest Missouri Federal supply train detained by high water at Neosho River Federal supplies running sht hearted, and those in the North who have all along opposed the war, to cry for peace at almost any price. Our forces, under General Grant, are still besieging Vicksburg,. and our lines are tightening around the enemy there. We may expect to hear of some definite action at that place shortly, as the enemy have now run short of s since he commenced the siege. He has perhaps nearly a hundred thousand men, and has already made several furious assaults on the enemy's works. The capture of Vicksburg and opening of the Mississippi River to the Gulf, will break the backbone of the Confederacy in the West, if not indeed of the entire South. When the Confederac
Maysville, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
o-operation between the eastern and western Rebel armies. And should reinforcements of a thousand or so men come down with our train the enemy in our front will not likely occupy their position on the south side much longer. What a grand idea it would be if our forces, when the half year is up, could make an advance all along our lines, east and west, and overthrow the enemy at every point. Several Indian women who have just arrived from near the Arkansas line a few miles south of Maysville, state that it was currently reported when they left, that General Brown, commanding the Missouri State troops in southwest Missouri, recently had a fight with General Marmaduke's cavalry and defeated it with considerable loss. We do not hear much about the movements of our troops southwest of Springfield and around Cassville, but hope that they have not been idle. We have expected however, that they would have moved forward and re-occupied Fayetteville before this. Had they done so a
Fayetteville (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
Arkansas line a few miles south of Maysville, state that it was currently reported when they left, that General Brown, commanding the Missouri State troops in southwest Missouri, recently had a fight with General Marmaduke's cavalry and defeated it with considerable loss. We do not hear much about the movements of our troops southwest of Springfield and around Cassville, but hope that they have not been idle. We have expected however, that they would have moved forward and re-occupied Fayetteville before this. Had they done so a month ago, it would have relieved us of the necessity of using so many of the troops of this command is watching the movements of the enemy along the Arkansas line to the east of us, and our isolation would not have been so complete as it is at present. Even at this moment it is probable that a force of the enemy is moving from Arkansas northeast of us, to attack our supply train. If there are as many volunteer troops in Southwest Missouri as there were
Texas (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
nemy, and driving him from his strong position, was skillfully conceived and magnificently and boldly executed. A military genius would not have conceived a better and more successful plan. To whom we are mostly indebted for the success of our arms, it would be difficult to say, where every one performed his duty so nobly. The enemy against whom we have been operating this spring and summer, are now doubtless satisfied that niggers can fight, and fight bravely under yankee officers. The Texas soldiers, if they had felt inclined to wait a few moments when Colonel Williams was leading the charge of his colored regiment, might have had an opportunity of seeing the fire in the eyes of the colored soldiers. But men who once delighted to ply the lash to the backs of colored men were now extremely anxious to get out of sight of these same colored men as quickly as possible. A beautiful thought to my mind comes up in connection with this first regular engagement, participated in by the
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
verthrow the enemy at every point. Several Indian women who have just arrived from near the Arkansas line a few miles south of Maysville, state that it was currently reported when they left, that of using so many of the troops of this command is watching the movements of the enemy along the Arkansas line to the east of us, and our isolation would not have been so complete as it is at present. Even at this moment it is probable that a force of the enemy is moving from Arkansas northeast of us, to attack our supply train. If there are as many volunteer troops in Southwest Missouri as thereassville, it is surely strange that the Department Commander does not permit them to march into Arkansas and seek the enemy. At any rate a large infantry force is not required in Southwest Missouri. h our scouts, is the force I mentioned about a week ago as being encamped at Cincinnati, on the Arkansas line, under command of Brigadier-General Cabell. If the enemy arrive on the ground at the plac
Grand (Canada) (search for this): chapter 17
the east as reported by rebel pickets Vicksburg closely invested by General Grant Federal troops in southwest Missouri Federal supply train detained by high water at Neosho River Federal supplies running short at Fort Gibson high water in Grand River Indian women report heavy firing in the vicinity of Cabin Creek General Cabell on the east side of Grand River, near Cabin Creek, with artillery the suspense a National salute fired in honor of Independence day beef and beans for barbecueGrand River, near Cabin Creek, with artillery the suspense a National salute fired in honor of Independence day beef and beans for barbecue the pinch of hunger horses and dead rebels floating in the River two days fighting at Cabin Creek gallant charge of the colored regiment total rout of the enemy how the Federal troops crossed Cabin Creek under fire General Cabell unable to join General Cooper's division on account of high water arrival of supply train at Fort Gibson. The rebel pickets shouted across the river on the 24th instant, that our commissary train was on the way down, and that Colonel Dodd was commanding the
Fort Gibson (Oklahoma, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
get drowned. The mystery of their deaths, however, will probably be cleared up in a few days, when we shall have been better informed of the operations of the two, opposing forces on the river north of us. The train and escort arrived at Fort Gibson, July 5th, just before twelve o'clock, although .we heard, early in the morning, that they would get in during the day. I made a good many inquiries concerning the cause of delay since they crossed the Neosho River at Hudson's ford. But we mareek after twelve o'clock. The escort continued to move with great caution, as it was not known but that the enemy might receive reinforcements and attempt to make another stand, as there are two rather strong positions between Cabin Creek and Fort Gibson. But our cavalry on the flanks noticed that the trails of the enemy through the high prairie grass did not point to either of the positions from which an attack would most likely be made if intended. It was ascertained that the enemy, after
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