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Kenesaw (Nebraska, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
age, below, it is said that the Confederates had signal stations and fresh lines of parapets on Kenesaw, Lost Mountain and Pine Mount. Kenesaw was not occupied by our (Southern) troops until the 19tKenesaw was not occupied by our (Southern) troops until the 19th, and Lost Mountain was abandoned on the 8th. Our only signal stations were on Kenesaw, as an observatory, and at headquarters. Page 53: The circumstances of General Polk's death were these: He haKenesaw, as an observatory, and at headquarters. Page 53: The circumstances of General Polk's death were these: He had accompanied General Hardee and me to Pine Mount to reconnoitre. We placed ourselves in a battery near the summit, on the enemy's side. After seeing everything that interested us, we turned to leaor numbers enabled him to make and man. The positions gained on the 21st, near the south end of Kenesaw, and on a hill near, were outside of our position --not occupied by our line, and if at all, on two semblances of mountains-Rocky Face, which covered the march by which he flanked Dalton and Kenesaw, less than two miles long. The country was no more unfavorable for the offensive than the Wild
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
. Johnston. It is stated on page 24 of General Sherman's Memoirs volume II, that on the 1st of May, 1864, the strength of the three armies — of the Cumberland, of the Tennessee, and of the Ohio — with which General Sherman was about to invade Georgia, was ninety-eight thousand, seven hundred and ninety-seven men of all arms present for duty, with two hundred and fifty-four field-pieces. As the forces of the three departments furnishing these troops amounted at the time to two hundred and twat described — a ditch about two feet deep, the earth thrown up on the outside, making a parapet two feet and a half high, surmounted with a head log. We had no intrenching tools, a disadvantage for which all the mountain streams and forests of Georgia would not have compensated. Page 56: These successive contractions of the enemy's line encouraged us and discouraged him, but were doubtless justified by strong reasons. On the 20th, Johnston's position was unusually strong; by which his troop<
Chattanooga (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
ral Sherman claims that substantially during May he had fought over one hundred miles of most difficult country — from Chattanooga to Big Shanty. The fighting commenced at Tunnel Hill, thirty miles from Chattanooga, and he reached Big Shanty only oChattanooga, and he reached Big Shanty only on the 10th of June. Page 49: I always estimated my force at about double his; but I also reckoned that in the natural strength of the country, in the abundance of mountains, streams and forests, he had a fair offset to our numerical superiorityof them fell in the actions about Atlanta. But at least three thousand were killed north of the Etowah, and buried at Chattanooga. As the towns and villages in the route of the Federal army were burned, there could have been no hospitals, and, the one hundred miles off, with three rivers intervening; while the Federal army, if unsuccessful, had a secure refuge in Chattanooga, which was easily reached. At Resaca, the Federal general had a still better opportunity, for the two armies met ther
Kingston, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
sharp fighting, all to the advantage of its enemy. The circumstances referred to on pages 40 and 41 are these (related in Johnston's narrative, pages 321 to 324): In the morning of May 19th, the Federal army was approaching Cassville, in two bodies, one following the railroad, the other the direct wagon road. Hardee's Corps was near the former, Polk's and Hood's at Cassville. Johnston determined to attack the column on the direct road with Polk's and Hood's Corps when the other was at Kingston, three hours march to the west. Polk was to meet and attack the head of the column; Hood, marching a little in advance of him on a road on his right, was to join in the action as the enemy deployed. When the latter had marched some miles in the proper direction, he turned his corps and marched back and formed it facing to the east, about a mile east of Cassville, upon a wild report brought him, he said, by one of his aide-de-camps. Neither this information nor his action upon it was repo
Peachtree Creek (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
eater proportionally. Page 70: The Confederates are accused of burning their pontoon bridges after crossing the Chattahoochee. They did not commit that folly. On the 17th, it was reported that the Federal army was on the southeast bank of the Chattahoochee, from Roswell to Powers' ferry. That night General Hood was placed in command of the Southern army by telegraph. On the 18th, at his urgent request, Johnston forced the troops on the. high ground, overlooking the valley of Peachtree creek from the south, to meet the advance of the Federal forces reported that morning by General Wheeler. General Sherman's returns, on pages 24 and 136, shows ninety-eight thousand seven hundred and ninety-seven men present for duty May 1st; one hundred and twelve thousand eight hundred and nineteen June 1st, and one hundred and six thousand and seventy July 1st. Those of the Southern army show forty-two thousand eight hundred present for duty May 1st; fifty-eight thousand five hundred
Marietta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
s, and General Sherman was deceived by reports of efforts to retake them and night attacks, which were never made by our troops. If the Confederate troops were so incessantly beaten, it is unaccountable that they were permitted to remain before Marietta four weeks, and then shifted their ground only to avoid losing their communications. The attack on Hooker and Schofield on the 22d, was made against orders by General Hood with Stevenson's Division, supported by Hindman's. It was defeated by inse who, like the writer, have often witnessed the vigorous and persistent courage of American soldiers, the best of whom were not superior to General Sherman's. But the testimony of the ten thousand and thirty-six graves in the Union Cemetery at Marietta, of soldiers killed south of the Etowah, is conclusive. Less than two thousand of them fell in the actions about Atlanta. But at least three thousand were killed north of the Etowah, and buried at Chattanooga. As the towns and villages in the
Macon (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
e of supplying the army. So it could have maintained itself there indefinitely, and so won the campaign with little more loss. This is no afterthought, but was expressed to General Hood when he took command. The Federal march to Jonesboroa caused, but did not compel, the abandonment of Atlanta. For if the Southern troops had remained in the place, the enemy would, in a few days, have been forced to return to his railroad. And, besides, Atlanta could have been sufficiently supplied from Macon, through Augusta; but at Jonesboroa the Federal troops could not be fed. This mode of gaining Atlanta made the acquisition of no great value. For the campaign continued, and General Sherman was occupied by General Hood until late in October, when he commenced the disastrous expedition into Tennessee, which left the former without an antagonist. Bentonville-pages 303-4-5-6: Johnston attempted to unite the three little bodies of his troops near Bentonville, on the 18th of March, to attack
Dalton, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
The Dalton-Atlanta operations. General Joseph E. Johnston. It is stated on page 24 of General port and memoirs, that the Confederate army at Dalton was brought to the verge of ruin by his movemeaking of roads by which the Southern troops at Dalton could reach Resaca before their antagonists. r result than that gained — the abandonment of Dalton by the Southern army. Rocky Face, instead of covering Dalton, completely covered the Federal flank march to Snake Creek gap, and, therefore, was s the impression that the position in front of Dalton was very strong, and he says in his report (pand, therefore, few deaths by sickness south of Dalton. These proofs show that the estimate on page offset to his numerical superiority. Between Dalton and Atlanta, one sees but two semblances of moe, which covered the march by which he flanked Dalton and Kenesaw, less than two miles long. The cothose attainable, indicate that it was not. At Dalton, only the southern left flank was covered by R[4 more...]
Adairsville (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
aula in consequence of the fighting described. It was because two bridges and a large body of Federal troops were discovered the afternoon of the 14th at Lay's ferry, some miles below, strongly threatening our communications by the indication of another flanking operation-covered by the river as the first had been by the ridge. To avoid this danger the Southern army crossed the Oostenaula about midnight, and moved along the railroad about seven miles. The 17th, it marched eight miles to Adairsville by eight o'clock A. M.; remained there till next morning (18th), and marched nine miles to Cassville before eleven o'clock; passed that day and the 19th there, and at one or two o'clock A. M. of the 20th marched to the Etowah, and crossed it early in the afternoon near the railroad. On page 36 the difficulties overcome by the Federal army seem somewhat magnified, and its advantage of greatly superior numbers depreciated. The operations in question can scarcely be termed rapid success
Chattahoochee River, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
s can be, could strike but two and a half per cent. of men exposed to their muskets and cannon, in seven lines at least, in two hours and a half. The writer has seen American soldiers, not inured to war, win a field with a loss ten times greater proportionally. Page 70: The Confederates are accused of burning their pontoon bridges after crossing the Chattahoochee. They did not commit that folly. On the 17th, it was reported that the Federal army was on the southeast bank of the Chattahoochee, from Roswell to Powers' ferry. That night General Hood was placed in command of the Southern army by telegraph. On the 18th, at his urgent request, Johnston forced the troops on the. high ground, overlooking the valley of Peachtree creek from the south, to meet the advance of the Federal forces reported that morning by General Wheeler. General Sherman's returns, on pages 24 and 136, shows ninety-eight thousand seven hundred and ninety-seven men present for duty May 1st; one hundre
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