hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Thomas J. Jackson 924 2 Browse Search
Winchester, Va. (Virginia, United States) 280 0 Browse Search
Virginia (Virginia, United States) 279 1 Browse Search
Cummings Jackson 278 0 Browse Search
George B. McClellan 269 1 Browse Search
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) 236 0 Browse Search
Tom Jackson 196 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 178 0 Browse Search
A. P. Hill 175 19 Browse Search
Henry Jackson 169 1 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson. Search the whole document.

Found 425 total hits in 89 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ...
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
replied, that you are so dreadfully punctual, and as the session had begun, and the time you promised to return had passed, we just supposed you were beside yourself with impatience. By no means, he replied; I had set out to return at the proper time; I had done my duty; the steamer was delayed by the act of Providence; and I was perfectly satisfied. He was married again, on July 15th, 1857, to Mary Anna Morrison, the daughter of Dr. R. H. Morrison, an eminent Presbyterian divine of North Carolina, and niece of the Honorable William Graham. This lady, with one living daughter, born in November 1862, survives him. Another infant, born in the early years of this marriage, was cut off at the age of a month. In no man were the domestic affections ever more tender and noble. He who only saw the stern self-denying soldier in his quarters, amidst the details of the commander's duties, or on the field of battle, could scarcely comprehend the gentle sweetness of his home life. There
West Point (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
he chief instruments of God in bringing him to a saving knowledge of the truth. Another spiritual guide now presented himself, in the chaplain of the garrison, the Rev. Mr. Parks. This gifted man was also an alumnus of the military academy at West Point, and a distinguished scholar. His religious zeal had led him to forsake the life of a soldier for that of a minister of the gospel in the Methodist Episcopal Church. In this communion he rose to distinction as a pulpit orator, and professor in their college, Randolph Macon, in Virginia. But his ecclesiastical views having undergone a change, he took orders in the Episcopal Church; and, as a clergyman of that communion, had, at one time, a post at West Point, and, at another, at Fort Hamilton. His ardent nature found much that was congenial in Jackson's. Under his ministry, the latter arrived at a comfortable hope of salvation, insomuch that he felt it his duty and privilege to apply for baptism, which he had never received. His
rest of the session to teaching them orally the Shorter Catechism, or some other suitable formula of truth. The exercises ended with the singing of a hymn, previously committed to memory, by the whole school, and a short prayer. Once a month he made a report of the punctuality and demeanor of each pupil, calling in person at the houses of their masters for this purpose; and if any servant was frequently absent or inattentive, he was sure to inquire into the cause during the week. The African character is ever dilatory. In his native jungle, the negro has no conception whatever of the value of time; and in his civilized state, he retains too much of this weakness. Hence, at all religious meetings which they frequent, they are usually found arriving at every moment, from the beginning to the very close. Jackson speedily began to experience the samo annoyance, and the lack of punctuality was unhappily countenanced by some of his teachers. He gave notice that the bell would rin
Sharpsburg (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
hour of the night, he was awakened by a gentle step in the room, and a hand upon his bed. It was Jackson, tenderly adjusting the bed-clothes around the infant's face; and when the father spoke, he replied that, knowing she was accustomed to a mother's watchfulness, he had lain awake thinking of the danger of her becoming uncovered and catching a cold; and had thought it best to come to his chamber and see that all was safe. This was also the mighty hand which guided the thunders of war at Sharpsburg and Chancellorsville! Upon becoming the proprietor of a house with a garden, and soon afterwards of a farm of a few acres, his rural tastes revived in full force. He devoted his hours of recreation to gardening with his own hands, and was, from the first, very successful. Indeed, the ability of his mind displayed itself, as in Washington, by the practical skill with which he handled everything which claimed his attention. His vegetables were the earliest and finest of the neighborho
Lexington (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
Chapter 4: life in Lexington. The narrative of Major Jackson's introduction into the military rn States. It is placed near the village of Lexington, in the county of Rockbridge, one of the mosulty of Washington College, have always made Lexington an attractive residence. The prosperity andot again. During nearly his whole life in Lexington, Jackson was a valetudinarian, and his regimliar gift for teaching; yet teaching was, at Lexington, his profession. In finding a solution of tits, it was consistent. Upon removing to Lexington, where the Christian people were divided amos still continued. Dr. White writes that in Lexington they continue to meet every Wednesday afternnd devout, was a happy man. He had, while in Lexington, his domestic bereavements, and he felt them returned to his post. At length he reached Lexington unexpectedly; and his first act was to visitment in which my friends can feel at home in Lexington. I have taken the first important step by s[8 more...]
Belgium (Belgium) (search for this): chapter 5
h him. His endeavors after self-control were strenuous, and he never for a moment lost the dignity of the Christian in his grief. But for a long time his taste for secular occupations and pleasures was lost, and his only aspirations pointed to the other world. During this season of discipline his health suffered seriously, and his friends induced him, in the summer of 1856, to make a European tour, in the hope that the spell might be broken which bound him in sadness. He visited England, Belgium, France, and Switzerland, spending about four months among the venerable architectural remains, and mountain scenery of those countries. This journey was the source of high enjoyment to him. But the opposition of his nature to all egotism was as strikingly shown here as elsewhere; he was no more inclined to speak of his travels than of his exploits. It was only at rare times, when with some intimate friend who could appreciate his sentiments, that he launched out, and related with enthus
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 5
its highest animation, he disclosed a knowledge which surprised his auditors, and his criticisms were profound. One instance may be noted among many. In the summer of 1856, he employed his long vacation in a European tour, in which he visited England, France, and Switzerland. During this journey he carefully examined the field of Waterloo, and traced out upon it the positions of the contending armies. When he returned home, he said that although Napoleon was the greatest of commanders, he to the other world. During this season of discipline his health suffered seriously, and his friends induced him, in the summer of 1856, to make a European tour, in the hope that the spell might be broken which bound him in sadness. He visited England, Belgium, France, and Switzerland, spending about four months among the venerable architectural remains, and mountain scenery of those countries. This journey was the source of high enjoyment to him. But the opposition of his nature to all egot
Chancellorsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
he was awakened by a gentle step in the room, and a hand upon his bed. It was Jackson, tenderly adjusting the bed-clothes around the infant's face; and when the father spoke, he replied that, knowing she was accustomed to a mother's watchfulness, he had lain awake thinking of the danger of her becoming uncovered and catching a cold; and had thought it best to come to his chamber and see that all was safe. This was also the mighty hand which guided the thunders of war at Sharpsburg and Chancellorsville! Upon becoming the proprietor of a house with a garden, and soon afterwards of a farm of a few acres, his rural tastes revived in full force. He devoted his hours of recreation to gardening with his own hands, and was, from the first, very successful. Indeed, the ability of his mind displayed itself, as in Washington, by the practical skill with which he handled everything which claimed his attention. His vegetables were the earliest and finest of the neighborhood. His stable an
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 5
athematics, to succeed Mr. Courtenay, himself an alumnus of West Point, who had long filled that place usefully and respectably. This University was the first in America, in the thoroughness of its instructions, and the dignities and emoluments of its professors. Jackson presented himself as a candidate, and procured many testimoe, his convictions concerning war as a pathway to distinction were greatly modified; and that he would now by no means accept a commission in any war which the United States might wage, irrespective of its morality. He had never, he said, while an ungodly man, been inclined to tempt Providence by going in advance of his duty; he he. Instances of his conscientiousness have already been given, but many others may be added. His convictions of the sin committed by the Government of the United States, in the unnecessary transmission of mails, and the consequent imposition of secular labor on the Sabbath day, upon a multitude of persons, were singularly stro
Providence, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
aid, while an ungodly man, been inclined to tempt Providence by going in advance of his duty; he had never seeng, as he did, in the special superintendence of Providence over all affairs, and His favorable oversight of may be accepted as a significant dispensation of Providence, that Jackson, the best type of the Christian. mration,--his constant recognition of a particular Providence. No man ever lived who seemed to have a more prats nature and powers. The Christian doctrine of Providence does not reduce the universe into a pantheistic ms in the inevitable progression. The doctrine of Providence teaches that the regular, natural agency of seconical action in matter. Now, the very doctrine of Providence is, that the God who conferred upon spiritual subd, that he who was so clear in his recognition of Providence was also eminently a man of prayer. This was onene my duty; the steamer was delayed by the act of Providence; and I was perfectly satisfied. He was married
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ...