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United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 6
exist. Once more; the formation of the United States under their present Constitution, was an ating treason against the Government of the United States, is just as absurd as to describe a parentthe governed? While the Government of the United States conciliated these, it was strong and efficinconvenience and loss which the remaining United States experience by the just secession of a parton afterwards, by the Supreme Court of the United States. This was rejected as nugatory, because t to impair the property of citizens of the United States in their slaves, residing among them; and intact, and to resist every attempt of the United States to coerce the seceders by unconstitutionalnd vast arsenals and armories; while the Confederate States had everything to create. He had the adus of even the sympathy of mankind. The Confederate States have, indeed, never complained of the reicy would not have made one slave less in all America, unless by so enhancing the miseries of their[22 more...]
Gulf of Mexico (search for this): chapter 6
e of that State were convinced that the season for discussion had passed, and the season for action had arrived. But, in all the other Southern States, while there was no respectable party anywhere which wavered in the purpose of vigorous resistance, there was a division of opinion concerning the time and mode of commencing it, denoted by the terms, Separate Secession, and Co-operative Secession. The advocates of the former prevailed at first in the planting States, bordering upon the Gulf of Mexico; of the latter, in the States lying next to the Free States, and in Virginia. With these Major Jackson sympathized. Although this class of patriots embraced many shades of opinion, their distinctive views were these:--That while the sectional action, and especially the temper of the Northern people, would justify before God and man an immediate separation, yet it was not politic to make it upon this provocation, because the South was so unprepared for that tremendous war which would pr
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
to many of their friends in Virginia. It is not important that the historian should decide whether the advocates of immediate or of co-operative secession were right. The purpose to coerce South Carolina illegally was, at once, indicated by the retention of the strongest work commanding her chief city and harbor, Fort Sumter; and the manner in which this threatening act was accompanied, aggravated the indignation of the people. On the 9th of January, 1861, Mississippi left the Union; Alabama and Florida followed on the 11th; Georgia on the 20th; Louisiana on the 26th; and Texas on the 1st of February. On the 9th of February, a Provisional Government of the six seceding States was instituted at Montgomery, in Alabama, with Jefferson Davis for President, and Alexander H. Stephens for Vice-President. Meantime the border Slave States, headed by Virginia, while declaring that they would not remain passive spectators of an attempt to chastise the seceding States for thus exercis
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 6
surpations were all inuring to the North against the South. A bounty on fisheries was granted from the first, which was as plainly for the partial advantage of New England, as though the tax-gatherer had, with his own hand, plucked the money out of the pockets of the rest of the citizens, to place it in theirs. This bounty, varying from one to two millions annually, and continued for eighty years, will account for the transfer of many hundreds of millions to New England from the other States. The Northern were maritime States; the Southern were, by population, climate, habits, and geographical position, inclined to agricultural pursuits. A code of navigas universal, to act only on the defensive, and to fulfil to the end every obligation of the Constitution. Major Jackson spent the summer vacation of 1860 in New England, in the pursuit of health. On his return, he said he had seen and heard quite enough in the North, to justify the division which had just occurred in the Democ
France (France) (search for this): chapter 6
he Conservative States of the South. This done, they boasted that they would proceed, first, to engross the whole of the American continent, and then to emancipate Ireland, to turn Great Britain into a democracy, to enthrone Red Republicanism in France, and to give the crowns of Germany to the Pantheistic humanitarians of that race, who deify self as the supreme end, and selfish desire, as the authoritative expression of the Divine Will. This, in truth, was the monster whose terrific pathway aality by any of the great masters of moral science, classic or scholastic, nor by any of the luminaries of the Church, patristic or reformed, until the dogma of modern abolition was born of atheistic parentage, amidst the radical disorganizers of France, in the Reign of Terror. In the Word of God, the only infallible standard of morality, that doctrine finds no support. Moses legalized domestic slavery for God's chosen people, in the very act of setting them aside to holiness. Christ, the gre
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 6
hich no well-informed American hazards his credit by disputing:--That the former colonies of Great Britain emerged from the Revolutionary War distinct and sovereign political communities or commonweatates against the Federal Government as rebellion, is preposterous. It was just as easy for Great Britain to rebel against Austria, while they were members of the great coalition against Napoleon. rst, to engross the whole of the American continent, and then to emancipate Ireland, to turn Great Britain into a democracy, to enthrone Red Republicanism in France, and to give the crowns of Germany their option, but by the greed of the Federal and British slave-traders, and the tyranny of Great Britain, thrusting the Africans upon the unwilling colonies. These citizens found it existing, recod as many of them can read, and do read God's Word, as of the agricultural peasantry of boasted England. It has been said that Virginian slavery forbids the marital and parental relations among slav
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
hat the historian should decide whether the advocates of immediate or of co-operative secession were right. The purpose to coerce South Carolina illegally was, at once, indicated by the retention of the strongest work commanding her chief city and harbor, Fort Sumter; and the manner in which this threatening act was accompanied, aggravated the indignation of the people. On the 9th of January, 1861, Mississippi left the Union; Alabama and Florida followed on the 11th; Georgia on the 20th; Louisiana on the 26th; and Texas on the 1st of February. On the 9th of February, a Provisional Government of the six seceding States was instituted at Montgomery, in Alabama, with Jefferson Davis for President, and Alexander H. Stephens for Vice-President. Meantime the border Slave States, headed by Virginia, while declaring that they would not remain passive spectators of an attempt to chastise the seceding States for thus exercising their unquestionable right, continued in the Union, and mad
Fort Hamilton (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
enceforward asserted the rights of the States, represented by Mr. Madison. In the Convention on the 31st May, 1787, Madison declared that the use of force against a State would be more like a declaration of war, than an infliction of punishment, and would probably be considered by the party attacked, as a dissolution of all previous compacts: a Union of States containing such an ingredient seemed to provide for its own destruction. In one of the debates on the New York State Convention, Hamilton said, To coerce a State would be one of the maddest projects ever devised. We have lived to see an attempt to coerce not one State but eleven. All agreed in declaring, that to give such a power over States, was inconsistent with the nature of the government designed, would infallibly corrupt it, and would make it justly odious to the States, and impracticable to be maintained, save by the utter banishment of republican freedom out of the land. What more complete proof is needed of this tr
uspense: leading the most experienced minds in Europe to doubt whether such a scheme of government iment very singular, very far removed from all European ideas, or even very impracticable, still, if And the tendency of the landless population of Europe to flow to the Western Continent, showed them of its actual numerical superiority, and its European immigration, stood ready to pour in thousandse larger. This power, which the old States of Europe expended such rivers of treasure and blood to radicalism, discontent, crime, and poverty of Europe, until the people of the Northern States becaming themselves of the avarice and injustice of Europe, made all the workshops, shipyards, and factor neglect and injustice from the governments of Europe. Men have seen fit to adopt the slanders of oral of those same States was recognized by all Europe eighty years ago, and, as is known to all the s to be better known than it is, generally, in Europe. It was on December 20, 1860, that the State [2 more...]
Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
outh ought to take its stand upon the outer verge of its just rights, and there resist aggression, if necessary, by the sword; that, while it should do nothing beyond the limits of strict righteousness to provoke bloodshed, yet any surrender of principle whatever, to such adversaries as ours, would be mischievous. In the Fall of 1859, the first angry drops of the deluge of blood which was approaching, fell upon the soil of Virginia. The event known as the John Brown Raid occurred at Harper's Ferry, in which that Border assassin endeavored to excite a servile insurrection and civil war, from that point. He and all his accomplices, save one, were either slain, or expiated their crime upon the scaffold. As his rescue was loudly threatened, a military force was mustered at Charleston, the seat of justice for Jefferson county, to protect the officers of the law in the exercise of their functions. Virginia then had scarcely any regular force, except the cadets of her military school
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