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Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 35
sion went abroad that Bragg and he had affected combinations now, which would leave Grant only the choice between retreat and destruction. If these tactics meant the detaching of Longstreet-said thoughtful critics-then are combination and suicide convertible terms! Neither was public feeling much cheered by the aspect of the war in Virginia. Lee and Meade coquetted for position, without definite result; the former-weakened by Longstreet's absence-striving to slip between Meade and Washington; the latter aiming to flank and mass behind Lee, on one of the three favorite routes to Richmond. The fall and winter wore away with these desultory movements; producing many a sharp skirmish, but nothing more resultful. These offered motif for display of dash and military tact on both sides; that at Kelly's Ford, on the Rapidan — where the Federals caught the Confederates unprepared-showing the hardest hitting with advantage on the Union side. The compliment was exchanged, by a decisiv
Lookout Mountain, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
its-apparently already in hand-had worn public patience so threadbare, that it refused to regard Chickamauga as anything more than another of those aimless killings, which had so often drenched the West, to no avail. Strong and open expression was made of the popular wish for General Bragg's removal; but Mr. Davis refused — as ever — to hear the people's voice, in a matter of policy. He retained General Bragg, and the people held him responsible for what they claimed was the result-Lookout Mountain! Fas est ab hoste doceri. Public clamor at the North declared that loss of command should reward Rosecrans for loss of the battle; and, in mid-October, he was superseded by General Grant. Like all popular heroes of the war, Grant had become noted, rather through hard-hitting than strategic combination. His zenith was mounted on the capture of Vicksburg; a project which northern generals denounced as bad soldiership and possible of success, only through an enemy's weakness. At
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
, at Tullahoma, faced by Rosecrans and flanked by Burnside's Army of the Cumberland, was forced to fall back to Chattanooga. Rosecrans pressed him hard, with the intent of carrying out that pet scheme of the North, forcing his army down through Georgia and riddling the Cotton States. It is inessential here to recount the details of these movements. Rosecrans had a heavy and compact force; ours was weak and scattered, and Bragg's urgent appeal for men met the invariable answer, there were none. to send. For the same reason-insufficient force-Buckner was forced to abandon Knoxville; and a few weeks later Cumberland Gap, the key-position to East Tennessee and Georgia, was surrendered! At this critical juncture the loss of that position could scarcely be exaggerated; and the public indignantly demanded of Government why it had been lost. The War Department shifted the responsibility, and declared that no reason existed; that the place was provisioned and impregnable, and that t
Appomattox (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
hern generals denounced as bad soldiership and possible of success, only through an enemy's weakness. At this time, he was certainly not in high estimation of his own army, because of dogged disregard of loss in useless assaults; and it will be recalled that General McClernand was court-martialed for his declaration that he could not be expected to furnish brains for the whole army! The estimate of Grant's compeers is not refuted by any evidence in the War Department that, from Shiloh to Appomattox, he ever made one combination stamped by mark of any soldiership, higher than courage and bull-dog tenacity. Even scouting the generally-accepted idea, in the army of Vicksburg and later in that of Chattanooga — that McPherson provided plans and details of his campaigns; and dismissing McClernand's costly taunt as mere epigram-this was the accepted estimate of General Grant's tactical power. But he inaugurated his command at Chattanooga with boldness and vigor. He concentrated 25,000
Gettysburg (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
e end. Gradual Weakening of the South the wearing-out process Sequelae of Vicksburg and Gettysburg Congress vs. President Mr. Foote and his following drain of men and material home guards d of the Confederacy may be dated from the loss of Vicksburg and the simultaneous retreat from Gettysburg. For these two disasters made all classes consider more deeply, both their inducing causes an a succession of such crushing blows. There can be little doubt that a complete victory at Gettysburg, vigorously followed up, would have ended the war; and the generally-accepted belief in the Soents that remembered us less than had we really been behind the great wall of China. After Gettysburg and Vicksburg, came a lull in the heavier operations of the war. But raids of the enemy's cavat, or retreat. Choosing the former, he made it with the same desperate gallantry displayed at Gettysburg, or Corinth; illustrated by brilliant, but unavailing, personal prowess. The strength of the
Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
ttering a regiment of the enemy — there demoralizing a home guard; and, at the river, fighting infantry and a gunboat, and forcing his way across into Indiana. Great was the scare in the West, at this first taste the fine fruits of raiding. Troops were telegraphed, engines flew up and down the roads as if possessed; and in short, home guards, and other troops, were collected to the number of nearly 30,000 men. Evading pursuit, and scattering the detached bands he met, Morgan crossed the Ohio line-tearing up roads, cutting telegraphs, and inflicting much damage and inconceivable panic-until he reached within five miles of Cincinnati. Of course, with his merely nominal force, he could make no attempt on the city; so, after fourteen days of unresting raiding-his command pressed, worn out and broken down-he headed for the river once more. A small portion of the command had already crossed, when the pursuing force came up. Morgan made heavy fight, but his men were outnumbered and ex
Cincinnati (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
cross into Indiana. Great was the scare in the West, at this first taste the fine fruits of raiding. Troops were telegraphed, engines flew up and down the roads as if possessed; and in short, home guards, and other troops, were collected to the number of nearly 30,000 men. Evading pursuit, and scattering the detached bands he met, Morgan crossed the Ohio line-tearing up roads, cutting telegraphs, and inflicting much damage and inconceivable panic-until he reached within five miles of Cincinnati. Of course, with his merely nominal force, he could make no attempt on the city; so, after fourteen days of unresting raiding-his command pressed, worn out and broken down-he headed for the river once more. A small portion of the command had already crossed, when the pursuing force came up. Morgan made heavy fight, but his men were outnumbered and exhausted. A few, following him, cut their way through the enemy and fled along the north bank of the Ohio. The pursuit was fierce and hot;
Missionary Ridge, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
the might have been once more popular discontent General Grant judged by his compeers Longstreet at Knoxville Missionary Ridge President's views and people's again the Virginia lines skirmish depletion desertions Kirby-Smithdom. Whilree communication with his rear and full time to recuperate. Instead of pressing on, General Bragg took position on Missionary Ridge; and criticism of the hour declared that he thus invested the Federals in the town, which-by a rapid advance-might aat rout-like retreat, day after day; finally beating back Thomas' advance so heavily that pursuit was abandoned. Missionary Ridge cost the South near 8,000 men; all the Chickamauga artillery and more; and the coveted key-position to the situation rag ged boys fighting successfully both the enemy and our own errorsthere came general bad augury from the panic of Missionary Ridge Mr. Davis had visited Bragg's army, after the howl that went up on his failure to press Rosecrans. On his retu
Chickamauga (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
results breaking down of cavalry Mounts echoes of Morgan's Ohio dash his bold escape Cumberland Gap a glance at Chickamauga the might have been once more popular discontent General Grant judged by his compeers Longstreet at Knoxville Miwhich it was based; and to have plainly stated the causes to which popular opinion ascribed certain results. After Chickamauga, there was very general-and seemingly not causeless-discontent. The eternal policy of massing great armies, at any sae grasp upon their fruits-apparently already in hand-had worn public patience so threadbare, that it refused to regard Chickamauga as anything more than another of those aimless killings, which had so often drenched the West, to no avail. Strong Rosecrans. On his return, the President appeared satisfied and hopeful; he authorized statement that the delay after Chickamauga was simply strategic; and the impression went abroad that Bragg and he had affected combinations now, which would leav
Ohio (United States) (search for this): chapter 35
he reached within five miles of Cincinnati. Of course, with his merely nominal force, he could make no attempt on the city; so, after fourteen days of unresting raiding-his command pressed, worn out and broken down-he headed for the river once more. A small portion of the command had already crossed, when the pursuing force came up. Morgan made heavy fight, but his men were outnumbered and exhausted. A few, following him, cut their way through the enemy and fled along the north bank of the Ohio. The pursuit was fierce and hot; the flight determined, fertile in expedients, but hopeless in an enemy's country, raised to follow the cry. He was captured, with most of his staff and all of his command that was left-save the few hundred who had crossed the river and escaped into the mountains of Virginia. Then for four months-until he dug his way out of his dungeon with a small knife-John Morgan was locked up as a common felon, starved, insulted and treated with brutality, the recital
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